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10

The Nikon D60 is a very old version of the D5100. The D5000 was actually between the two in the models history. The D5100 is a step up in every important aspect, if the price is the same, I see no reason why to get the D60 over the D5100. The D5100 is the current up to date model with great high ISO performance, a flip out screen, and other current day ...


10

If the pictures are all pure black (as in every pixel is colour 0,0,0) then that sounds like a fairly terminal electronics problem. If you're getting black photos where noise is visible if you boost the exposure on the computer then it sounds like a shutter malfunctioning. If the viewfinder is not blacking out momentarily it could be the mirror is staying ...


8

Yes. Do not think about them as D100 lenses. They are Nikon F-Mount lenses. The D100 is Nikon DSLR with a 1.5X sensor crop and will work with any F-mount lens. This includes the Nikkor, Sigma, Tokina, Tamron, etc. Additionally, the D90 and D100 have a built-in focus motor, so autofocus works with AF and AF-S lenses.


6

I hate to say this, but first make sure you're pressing the right button, as I always press the wrong one. There are two similar buttons. One is the function button near the top of the lens, and the DOF preview button is almost under the lens. If you press the DOF button, even with the aperture wide open, it will make a very clunky sound, like when you ...


6

Despite the D90 being a full two years older than the D3100 I think it still holds up against the newer model. The D90 does exposure and white balance bracketing, not achievable with the D3100. Also the screen on the D90 is superior, with 920,000 dot resolution vs the 230,000 of the D3100. One area the D90 falls down is in video - if you want to use ...


6

This has nothing to do with the camera. All cameras have the same thread which is used to attach it to a support like a tripod. What you are looking for is a quick-release plate and that is specific to the tripod head you use. If you have the exact model, you have to look it up and find out the part number for the plate. That is the one to order. For ...


6

According to Nikon's web site, there's some metal under that plastic. The magnesium alloy employed for the top and rear covers endows the camera with high robustness and durability, despite its compact, lightweight body. The body is effectively sealed at various locations, ensuring weather-resistance and dust-prevention performance. Although I wasn't ...


5

See this on the golden ratio and this on the rule of thirds. In short, these "rules" aren't very well supported as rules, and Nikon's assumption might be that they're unlikely to be very important to someone buying a mid-level DSLR. The even division has the advantage of showing you the center nicely, and simply having more lines is nice for alignment ...


5

Since the aperture directly affects image composition, it might not be desirable to stop your lens down when you hit the minimum possible shutter speed and ISO for your camera. The LO ISO option is pointless as well, since this is just an image pulled one stop in software to ISO 100 (in your case), which can be done (and probably better) in your ...


5

This is not a problem with the LCD screen. The images are under exposed. In easy terms, not enough light is hitting the sensor to 'take' the picture, so it's coming out black. When it's blurred, it's because the shutter speed is too long and is recording everything in sees in the period of time the shutter is open (hence the blur as if you're handholding, ...


4

If with landscape photography you mean a wider angle lens, then I have bought a used Sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6 lens to use with my D90 and am very happy with its results. Now, I read that wide angle is not for letting more in (usually) so only consider this option if you feel the 18mm end if not wide enough for you. Luckily you will be able to rent some lens. ...


4

One I always hear about is KEH. They are in Georgia.


4

Unless you have programmed the DOF button to do something else, which you can on most DSLRs, you should see a difference as long as there are objects at different distances in your viewfinder. At the very least, the view has to get darker when stopping down. If it does not, then you DOF button is doing something. If it is, you will see a change in ...


4

I would step up to the SB-600 as this flash unit has a turntable head. So when you are shooting a portrait photograph (portrait as in aspect rather than person) you will be able to turn the flash head to bounce as it would if your camera was taking a Landscape shot. That's the basics, but if you want to use a flash with a turntable head, you also get the ...


4

No, you cannot change the metering mode via the menu. You can't change exposure compensation, shutter speed and aperture, and most other things that have special buttons or dials setup for them. The menus are more for specialised and detailed settings. For example there is a dial for setting the self timer on/off, but a menu option to set the self timer ...


4

Hold down the BKT button (front left beside lens) and rotate the rear thumbwheel until it says 0F (zero frames) in the top display. I don't think there is equivalent way to shut it off via the menus. By the way, the front thumbwheel controls the f/stop difference between each exposure. If you only ever want to do exposure bracketing, you can go to custom ...


4

You asked about basic testing of a used D90 but I have commented for DSLRs in general. Much but not all will apply to a D90 and most will be useful in most cases. If you can devise a high reliability way of doing this you can make money from it. Alas, modern DSLR camera are complex electromechanical mechanisms which have many potential ways of going wrong....


4

I really wouldn't call that an upgrade - the D3100 is technically a superior camera - faster processor, higher pixel count, better sensor tech, the only things in the (quite old) D90 are the AF motor and the screen resolution. So assuming you dont want to use older lenses without internal AF drive, then yes, this would be a downgrade. http://en.wikipedia....


4

Opinion. Electrical engineering a specialty. Rubs shoulders with Mechanical engineering: It really is personal preference, and there are no hard and fast rules. Anything that a user did that was severe enough to significantly decrease shutter life you'd expect to show up in other areas as well. If it looks like it's been very roughly treated then that may ...


4

The maximum aperture (minimum f stop) of your lens is different at different lenghts. For this reason, if you set up 3.5 at 20mm and then zoom to 80mm it will be automatically reduced to 5.6 (the maximum possible). If you set up an f stop high enough for your maximum focal, it will not change as you zoom: have you tried it in practice? What will change with ...


4

Edit: The more I think about this, the less convinced I am that what I wrote originally is the answer, especially if this is happening with other lenses. I didn't see the same failure mode, either; mine just quit focusing. I'm going to query the OP about a couple of things in the comments and will revise this answer if I come up with anything else. ...


4

What I personally do is use the exposure compensation. (I have a Canon myself, so exposure compensation for me is just one flick at the big wheel. For your camera you need to press a button in combination with a dial, so it is a little bit more cumbersome). Set the exposure compensation to -2 for your first batch. Then you get three shots: -4 -2 0 Then ...


4

When the light gets dim enough there comes a time when you have to give up shooting sequences of fast moving objects coming towards you and instead pre-focus on a spot and wait for the subject to hit the mark. Cross ties work pretty good for locking focus on a point the train is about to be. You also gain the advantage of getting the one shot when the train ...


4

It may be the result of a battery going dead without prior warning. This happened to me using a third party battery pack. In order to fix this replace the battery pack with a charged one (preferably a Nikon battery). Turning the camera on will likely result in the "Err" message being displayed. Simply press down the shutter and the mirror should move into ...


4

Nikons from that era (D40, D50, D60, etc) have a couple of things that are fairly well known to cause the dreaded 'Shutter Error" and/or locked up mirror. The first is that the main drive wheel for the shutter/mirror cocking mechanism is dirty or needs lubrication. This wheel can be accessed on many Nikon cameras by removing the floor plate of the camera. ...


3

Bring a monopod or a tripod with a good panning head. I was an SCCA corner marshall aka flagger for about a decade. I spent a lot of time talking with the pro photographers who shot race cars for a living. They all had tripods but one, he had a monopod. I was talking to him about it. I asked why he didn't use a tripod. He smiled and said "I get the shots ...


3

As others have explained, one big motivation for the jump to the SB-600 is the ability to tilt/swivel. If that is your primary hangup (i.e. you don't want/need CLS, extra power, filters) you can pair the SB-400 with a cheap pin-for-pin flash cable. This will give you the flexibility to bounce off whatever surface, and even get the flash off-axis from the ...


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