6

According to Nikon's web site, there's some metal under that plastic. The magnesium alloy employed for the top and rear covers endows the camera with high robustness and durability, despite its compact, lightweight body. The body is effectively sealed at various locations, ensuring weather-resistance and dust-prevention performance. Although I wasn't ...


6

It may be the result of a battery going dead without prior warning. This happened to me using a third party battery pack. In order to fix this replace the battery pack with a charged one (preferably a Nikon battery). Turning the camera on will likely result in the "Err" message being displayed. Simply press down the shutter and the mirror should move into ...


5

This is not a problem with the LCD screen. The images are under exposed. In easy terms, not enough light is hitting the sensor to 'take' the picture, so it's coming out black. When it's blurred, it's because the shutter speed is too long and is recording everything in sees in the period of time the shutter is open (hence the blur as if you're handholding, ...


4

What I personally do is use the exposure compensation. (I have a Canon myself, so exposure compensation for me is just one flick at the big wheel. For your camera you need to press a button in combination with a dial, so it is a little bit more cumbersome). Set the exposure compensation to -2 for your first batch. Then you get three shots: -4 -2 0 Then ...


4

When the light gets dim enough there comes a time when you have to give up shooting sequences of fast moving objects coming towards you and instead pre-focus on a spot and wait for the subject to hit the mark. Cross ties work pretty good for locking focus on a point the train is about to be. You also gain the advantage of getting the one shot when the train ...


4

Nikons from that era (D40, D50, D60, etc) have a couple of things that are fairly well known to cause the dreaded 'Shutter Error" and/or locked up mirror. The first is that the main drive wheel for the shutter/mirror cocking mechanism is dirty or needs lubrication. This wheel can be accessed on many Nikon cameras by removing the floor plate of the camera. ...


3

What could cause the menu and playback to stop working on a D90? The camera is broken. You've already tried pretty much everything that you can as an end user to diagnose or reset the camera. Since it would cost far more than the camera is worth just to have it diagnosed, it is time for another camera. Since you've got nothing much to lose at this point, ...


3

You took this photo indoors, without a flash, in low light. The camera selected a high(er) ISO then would be desirable especially when "pixel peeping" at 100% on screen. If you would post an image to a website that does not strip the EXIF info, I could tell you more about this, but as it is posted on Imgur I cannot tell you what ISO was selected. Another ...


3

No, you didn't make a mistake if the camera is meeting your needs. The D90 has an advantage in terms of controls for someone who is more experienced, but the D5300 has an advantage in terms of sensor quality. So if you are pretty new and learning, a basic model that has fewer controls to confuse can actually be an advantage for now, particularly since, all ...


3

No, it will not charge the battery. USB Voltage is 5V and the camera battery is ~7.4. They would have had to include a buck boost converter and other circuity in the camera just to allow for USB charging. However, the D90 does have the DC IN jack on the side. In the future, you'd be able to use an EH-5a AC Adapter to power/charge your camera. Of ...


3

I get excellent results in good light levels (despite the body being somewhat outdated), but struggle in low light conditions without a flash. "Somewhat outdated" is quite the understatement — this camera is over ten years old. In that last decade, sensor technology has made big advances, and largely in the ability to capture images in very low light. I'd ...


3

This is probably a whitebalance problem. NEF or RAW files don't have a white balance setting yet. They are a recording of the data before any settings such as whitebalance are applied. If you load the NEF file in a viewer, it will make some assumption on what whitebalance to use, that is why it looks different in different programs. Try opening the NEF ...


2

These answers were very helpful in helping me find the problem on my Nikon D90, but in my case it was much more simple. The write lock tab had slid to lock mode when inserting the card. This may be one of the first things to check, pull the card, make sure the tab is in the writeable position, and reinsert it carefully into the camera to avoid brushing it ...


2

Hockey is a fast, difficult sport to photograph. 1/400 sounds like the minimum acceptable shutter speed, so when you're running out of aperture with the 70-200 then your only choice is to boost the iso sensitivity still further. That's not ideal, I know, but the alternative is to spend money on a new camera that will give cleaner images at high ...


2

If a manual shutter speed is changing, then you have Bracketing turned on. Turn bracketing off. Change number of bracketed shots to be zero.


2

A fast prime, like the 50mm f/1.4 lets in about 8x to 16x the amount of light that your current lens does (f/3.5-5.6). It is not very expensive and what most people use for low light situations. The f/1.8 version does almost the same, and is extremely cheap. The disadvantages are that it has no zoom, so you may need to crop a bit, and with 50mm you need to ...


2

You said "all night", which sounds like it was too dark for your settings. Ways to get a faster shutter speed are: Go into a more bright area with enough light, where automation can do better. Photography is tough without enough light. One way to provide more light is to use flash. Open the aperture and/or increase the ISO so that a faster shutter can ...


2

Your shutter button could be defective. If it is, then consider using back button focusing (repurposes the AE-L button as focus). It's a lot cheaper than getting your camera fixed. There are many tutorials on line. I like this tutorial since it explains a number of options. It takes some time to become accustomed to this technique. I set mine up for AF-C ...


1

Any time you view a "raw" image on any device, one of two things is happenning: The raw data in the file is being processed and interpreted by the application you are using to view the image. That application may be a simple photo viewer built into the device's firmware, or it may be a sophisticated photo editor such as Lightroom or Photoshop. There is no ...


1

If by exposure you mean exposure compensation look for menu option b2. Easy exposure compensation.


1

It could be just about anything. Your Nikon D90 has a 420 pixel RGB light meter that is essentially a second, very low resolution image sensor. The chances are pretty high that the connection between the light meter and the camera's main processing unit has been damaged. It could be something as simple as a ribbon cable coming unplugged, or as devastating ...


1

In principle, a firmware update could improve SDXC compatibility to support video. However, based on historical precedence, it's unlikely to happen. No such update appears to exist as of Sep 2018. See Nikon D90 SDXC Compatibility.


1

I'm afraid what you are describing sounds like a physical problem with the camera or lens. There is a metal lever on the back of a D lens that closes the aperture, and it should move freely. It sounds like either the camera is not moving the lever properly, or that part of the lens mechanism is broken. You could troubleshoot the problem by testing the ...


1

Your basic issue is that you expect viewing the image at 100% to look just as good as viewing it at more typical sizes. Your D90 has a resolution of 4288 X 2848 pixels. When zoomed in to 100% and viewed on a typical 96 dpi monitor, that equates to a total image size of 45" X 30"! Even an image shot in plenty of light at a very fast shutter speed from a ...


1

I would probably keep it on manual, with a speed on about 1/250 or even 1/125 and ISO 3200 or 1600. keep the aperture on either max aperture and try up to 5.6 depend on the light.


1

If the camera is having trouble focusing, you can use try using manual focus and waiting for the train to come to the correct depth and take the photo at that moment (or take a series of photos near the time). Additionally, if you have enough light, as Michael Clark noted, you can stop down the aperture (bigger number) in order to increase the depth of ...


1

You are most probably using Auto ISO. Turn it off, set the ISO to a low level (200), that will handle the pictures being noisy and grainy. You are in aperture priority mode (A), so you will have long shutter, so to avoid your pictures getting blurry, use a tripod. Or use better lighting.


1

When you say "ISO 200-2000" I assume you are using auto-iso, is that correct? Try using P mode instead of A, and select a 200 or 400 ISO.


1

Light is made up of particles emitted randomly from a lightsource. If the camera doesn't collect enough light this randomness causes neighboring pixels to be either too light or too dark which is perceived as grain in the image. So to get less grain you need more light. This is achieved by either: opening the shutter for longer, if your subject is ...


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