41

Stars don't show up voluntarily on a photo. You need to tweak them a bit using photo editing tools on a computer. Best if you use RAW file format, and RAW-processing software to do this. JPEGs can be tweaked to show more stars, but with a lot less working room and result being of lesser quality. The likely JPEG image you get with the exposure settings you ...


11

The D7000 has dual card slots. If you mistakenly didn't have a card in either, then you would have been in "demo mode", which is something you can use to look at shots in the camera store to evaluate the camera. Images are stored in-memory, but you cannot download them, only preview them on the LCD. Usually the LCD will display "DEMO MODE" to indicate ...


10

Simple answer to your main question is: The Dynamic-range of the sensors of current digital camera is not yet a match for the dynamic range of human eye's sensor (aka retina). Detailed answer of "how to bring it up" will bring all the techniques on the table. The majors are: Widest possible aperture on lens, if possible f/1.8 or f/1.4 Widest angle: To ...


8

This kind of fast then slow performance (as you correctly guessed) will be because of the image buffer filling up. Using a faster card will help until you reach the limit of the camera's circuitry - you may have reached this limit. Even if your camera's performance is faster than the SD card. It's quite possible that some of the card's 'bandwidth' is taken ...


8

Anything you are viewing on the screen is not raw data. Raw image data are linear monochrome luminance values and nothing else. Anything that shows more than one color is the result of the application you are using to view the image translating the raw luminance values into gamma corrected light curves and demosaicing applied to create interpolated colors ...


7

Absolutely. There is a great dongle+app, offered by TriggerTrap. I purchased it and I'm super happy with it. If I recall correctly, the app is available for iOS and Android. EDIT: Some of the free app's options are as follows: Simple cable release Press and hold Press and lock Timed release Timelapse TimeWarp (time lapse + acceleration) DistnaceLapse (...


7

To confirm ben rudgers' analysis, I took the NEF file you supplied and ran it through RawTherapee. Here's an enlargement of a similar crop with no adjustments and the default "amaze" demosaicing algorithm: Here's the same with "DCB" algorithm: And here's the same with the "VNG4" algorithm, which is known to be resistant to green-crosstalk, but a little ...


5

In Nikon DLSRs, including the D7000, there is image-processing software that removes noise and hot pixels, and this software has come to be known as "the star eater" because it interprets isolated bright pixels as noise and removes them or averages them into the background. Isolated bright pixels, of course, are kind of what you want to see when you're ...


5

This question is only relevant if you have a camera without a built-in AF motor in the camera, like the D3300. In this case, you would need an AF-S lens that has a motor in the lens itself. In your case, the D7000 does have a built-in AF motor. This means any AF lens, whether or not it has a motor in the lens itself, will autofocus.


5

Yes. Send it to Nikon Factory Service and let them repair it. If the dial is broken the only place you can get replacement parts is to send it to Nikon and let them repair it. Nikon no longer sells parts to third party repairers, other than a few external parts. I highly doubt you will be able to obtain a replacement part anywhere other than Nikon factory ...


4

Nikons have a reputation of coming from the factory with a little too much oil on the shutter mechanisms. Some of the excess oil eventually finds its way onto the sensor. What you are seeing in your photos is the shadow of the oil (and the dust stuck to it) on your sensor. You will probably have to go through several cycles of cleaning your sensor before the ...


4

The D7000 already has a bracketing button (shown in the image above) on the left side, above the lens mount. While keeping this button pressed, you can rotate the front and rear command dials to configure the exposure value (± EV) and the no. of frames. You can then switch the shutter release to CL (continuous low) or CH (continuous high) to take multiple ...


4

Most dSLRS use focal plane shutters with two curtains. The first curtain "opens" the shutter, and the second one "closes" it. The size of the gap between the two shutters determines the shutter speed. The smaller the gap, the faster your shutter speed. When you reach your maximum sync speed (usually around 1/200s, for most cameras), that's the fastest ...


4

D7000 Manual (p99) clearly states that having the lens on "M" while having the body on "AF" can cause damage to the camera. It does not say in what order the switches should be set so the safest procedure might be to turn the camera to the "off" position while setting the two switches.


4

Yes, different lenses can definitely have different focus speeds. When focusing, a specific group of elements are typically moved. The size and weight of a group of elements varies with a given lens formula. When focusing a small prime with only a few elements/groups, the AF motor isn't going to have to move much weight. Zoom lenses almost always have more ...


4

Building atop of laurencemadill's answer, if you do not want to invest the money for Lightroom at the moment, RawTherapee is a similar raw development tool that is open source and serves my basic editing needs well. It supports profiles as well and you can batch convert images at your convenience. (For example, Ctrl+A to select all, assign profile, send them ...


4

Digital cameras use sensors that actually have a fixed, intrinsic sensitivity to light. This means that as the total amount of incident light drops, so too does true exposure. Digital cameras get around this by adding configurable ISO levels, which simply boost the electronic signal generated by that incoming light by a certain amount. The only way to truly ...


4

There should be a setting to disable the auto sleep function of the camera. With this you can then leave the playback image mode on. If the camera has a Liveview mode you could turn that on as it would probably drain battery more quickly, but be cautious with this because it means leaving the sensor exposed. You could reduce this by ensuring that a lens is ...


4

Use a smaller aperture to get a larger depth of field and give yourself a little more room for error. Even just going from f/3.5 to f/4 at 18mm would probably give you about an extra 10 feet of depth of field so that small focusing errors aren't a problem. You can easily compensate with ISO so that you don't have to drop the shutter speed.


4

You misunderstand Auto FP, which starts just above the cameras maximum sync speed, and allows up to the maximum shutter speed the camera permits (1/8000 second on some models) if with a HSS flash unit. However beware, the HSS flash becomes continuous light for the duration, and maximum power level is reduced to about 20%, so range is limited. See http://www....


3

Your Nikon D7000 is capable of AF Fine Tune. For how to determine if your problem is AF Fine Tune related see Do the issues with sharpness I am seeing require AF fine-tuning? For how to adjust AF Fine Tune, see the following: What is the best way to micro-adjust a camera body to a particular lens? Which offers better results: FoCal or LensAlign Pro? Beyond ...


3

Yes, this is normal. Assuming that this works the same on the D7000 as the D7100, search the manual for "standby timer". The c2 custom setting (on the D7100) controls for how long the settings can be changed after a half-press of the shutter button. The default is 6 seconds. You can increase this or set it to "no limit". Quoting the manual: The ...


3

Have you checked the mechanical linkage on the body that reads the aperture setting from objective to see if it is stuck? If it is not stuck try moving it by hand and see if the aperture reading changes. The mechanical aperture ring likage may be used to read the aperture ring position and if it is not in the pictured position and springed and moving around ...


3

Is there a sensor in there that I may have damaged and this is giving the false reading? There is a contact switch in the SD card socket that detects the presence of a seated card. This switch is part of the SD card socket assembly. It is possible that some of the debris plastic has become lodged behind the switch, preventing the switch from moving when a ...


3

Phase Detection Autofocus (PDAF) performance is a complex combination of various factors. For you and your camera to nail focus all of these factors must be working together. If any single factor isn't set correctly, can't do the job, or doesn't work as it should, the entire system will miss focus to one degree or another. No AF system is perfect. Even the ...


3

The images are obviously front focused. If it happens consistently with more lenses (not just one) then it is the body; if you can't compensate it enough with AF Fine (as it seems) you need to send in the camera for calibration...and hope it's not too expensive if your camera is not under warranty. On the other hand, if it happens so heavily just with the ...


3

Try to set different camera calibration profiles in lightroom and observe the effect. Color reproduction is a function of the profile, so it cannot be a problem of the camera. It is possible that the default adobe profile is not to your liking, but since you shot raw, you still have all options open to you.


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