18

Apparently you have the Highlight Alert feature on. This allows you to preview areas of your picture that are overexposed (receiving too much light) and decide if this is your intention or not. This is a very handy feature, but if you prefer to turn it off you can follow this tutorial (source): Press the Menu button, then use the Multi-selector to ...


11

The 99% likely best answer is, of course, to send it to a competent camera repairer. Odds are 'It's broken'. However, just in case, and very very unlikely, try the following. These have almost no chance of being successful, but in a few cases may work: Remove & replace lens. Is mirror stuck up? If so, DO NOT TRY to move it. Take to repairer. If ...


11

I live in Sweden and I own a Canon EOS 450D. So far I've never had any problems with it in temperatures down to -20 °C (apart from a somewhat reduced battery life). I wouldn't really worry about your camera not working at sub zero. Every swede I know uses his/her camera in the winter (as well as their cell phones and other electric toys) and to the best of ...


10

On a DSLR, when you use the viewfinder, the mirror is lowered, and a secondary mirror reflects some of the light to phase-based AF and exposure sensors at the bottom of the camera. These are accurate and fast. When you use live view, the AF is contrast-based AF (the camera lens hunts until it find a position that maximizes contrast). This is slow (in your ...


9

Your lens is not parfocal. If you had a parfocal lens, you would know it. Mainly because the prices of true parfocal zoom lenses ($10K and up) mean only those who really need them and know why they need them buy them. A parfocal lens is a zoom lens that maintains the same focus distance as it is zoomed in and out. Most lenses used by anyone other than ...


8

Without seeing an example image, it's hard to tell which of the following is the problem. Your lens is on manual focus. Note that having the camera's exposure dial on the green "Auto" is not the same thing as auto-focus. Auto-focus is usually controlled on the side of the lens itself with an "A/M" switch. The subject is moving too fast for your shutter ...


8

In your D5100, "Live View" mode is activated by trigerring the 'Lv' switch next to the Mode selection dial (right under the 'Info' button). However, this information is covered in the manual of your camera. There you have it in page 99, section 'Live View'. If you are new to the camera, you should definitely go through it, it'll help you a lot.


7

The good news is that cameras rarely get damaged by cold, even considerably below their operating limit which is 0C for nearly all DSLRs except some from Pentax. The bad news is that they stop working quickly. How quickly depends on the ambient temperature and particular camera. What fails first is the batter which looses it ability to supply current while ...


7

Short Answer: Focus mode is how the camera focus while the AF-area is where the camera focus. Focus modes AF-S/One Shot AF - Find focus only once while the release button is half-pressed AF-C/AI Servo AF - Find focus until the release button is fully pressed or released AF-A/AI Focus AF - Let the camera decide if it should use AF-S or AF-C MF - The ...


7

It's because on a (Nikon) DSLR, live view is part of the video stream with rolling shutter. This stream is usually not in a raw format and is typically reduced resolution. Some Nikon's have a "silent live view photography" menu option that allows recording a video frame w/o switching into still mode (mirror/shutter fixed). In order to switch back to full ...


6

Don't worry that the D5100 isn't listed. The picture controls can be downloaded for use by the software (View NX2) or to be uploaded onto the camera. You're only interested in making them available for View NX2, so don't need to worry about the camera model. If you haven't selected another Picture Control setting in your D5100 menu, it will have defaulted ...


6

No, there is nothing you can do. Nikon's AF-P lenses do not work with the D5100. At the time of release of the first AF-P lenses (the 18–55mm, both with and without VR), the only cameras that supported AF-P lenses were D5300 and D5500, and a firmware update was made available to the D3300 so it would support AF-P lenses as well. See this article at ...


6

Because in the Nikon D3x00 and D5x00 series, as well as many previous entry level Nikon DSLRS and pretty much all Nikon 35mm film SLRs, the same mechanical motion actuates the mirror assembly and the aperture linkage. Once the mirror is up, the aperture can not be changed from the body. This worked fine when the mirror was always down until just before a ...


5

When your camera adjusts your settings (aperture, shutter speed, and/or ISO) to get a certain exposure value it is basing those decisions on the tone of the image (different from color). It could be any color, but the tone should average out to be 18% grey (thus the use of grey cards that are 18% grey). So if you had a bright white vs a dark white you ...


5

This is called "shallow depth of field", there are 3 factor (that you control) that affect depth of field: Distance to subject - as you get closer less will be in focus, also, you will get more background blur if the background is far away Focal length - longer focal length = less in focus Aperture - this is the easiest to use because it's a setting you ...


5

The mirror is interposed between the viewfinder and the sensor. The shutter is interposed between the mirror and the sensor. The mirror throws the image into the viewfinder, bypassing the sensor, so if you have a clear viewfinder image but live view (or an actual photo) shows a dark band, this suggests the problem is a sticky shutter. You will need to have ...


5

From the D5100's manual (page 81), the 600+ images is by the CIPA standard, and does not include live view — just 4 seconds of review for each image. It's not surprising at all that real-life usage is much less, particularly if you are using live view constantly. Sadly, I think your options are: Change your habits, or Pick up some spare batteries.


5

Note in your examples that images at row 4, columns 5, 6 & 7 and row 7, columns 7, 8, 9 &10 have a faint "white" bar at the top of the image. Increasing the brightness and or gamma on the sample supplied shows what appears to be a reddish line source. Doing the same on individual images may give you some visual clues as to what happened. The ...


4

Yes, you're okay on an D5100. Higher-level Nikon bodies (like the D7000) can be damaged when used with pre-1977 lenses, but the D5100 and other bodies with electronic-only coupling will work fine with pretty much any Nikon-mount lens ever. The D7000 and up have a tab used for metering with the newer lenses, and aren't safe — but that same tab means that you ...


4

Whats happening is that the shutter stays closed, it is a quite normal issue on D5100, to fix to as follows: You can check that this is happening by setting camera to video and you will see no screen but sound will be recorded. Set to manual mode, set minimun shutter speed as so shutter stays open for a while, during this, hold camera with one hand ...


4

I can do it on my Nikon D5000. On the Info screen bottom right select BKT and select AE2.0 then back in the Info screen from release mode select continuous. You can now hold down the shutter for three shots and it will give the 3 shots with 3 exposures for a HDR. It is possible to do some HDRs without a tripod doing this if there is enough light and you hold ...


4

I sucessfully used NEF-to-JPG. It is freeware, and can convert from NEF to JPG or TIFF formats


4

check if all these have the right settings. 1) on the lens, the slider control to switch between manual and auto focus 2) in the camera setting, switch the auto focus "on" 3) in the camera setting , set the focus mode to "continuous mode" if these options are all right, then your camera must be able to auto focus. but if not then there definitely may ...


4

Any of those lenses will be fairly comparable. They all have their positives and negatives... I have the Nikkor lens which I picked up as my first zoom in that range to use on film and it is what it is, it's built to a price and that shows. It's not the sharpest at 300mm but (although that also makes it light if you plan to carry it around). Because of ...


4

If you only want to use the flashes in manual mode, I recommend radio triggers. You can pick up a set with one transmitter and two receivers for around $30USD. I use this set occasionally. If I needed them on a daily basis I would invest in something a little heavier duty, but these have never failed to fire, and are fairly easy on the batteries.


4

You are correct. The D5100 does not have a Depth-of-field preview functionality. If you take a look at the list of Nikon DSLRs, the one with the icons in the shape of an iris have that feature. The D7000 just below the D5100 on the list has it. Typically, this function does not make it into entry-level cameras. The best you can do it take a test shot and ...


4

You'll probably need to get it serviced. There are a lot of other things that could be wrong from that harsh of a drop anyway. Also, don't go to the same camera shop you went to. Replacing the battery made no sense at all for your scenario. They were either incompetent at their jobs or worse, just wanted to get money from you by selling a battery you ...


4

You can use a wired remote release that has a built in intervalometer, such as this fairly inexpensive one or this one. Regardless of the brand name stamped on them, they all seem to be made identically. You then set the camera to Bulb and let the timer in the remote open and close the shutter.


4

This lens uses a screw driven AF, meaning the body drives the AF. The D5xxx series and D3xxx series of cameras need AF-S lenses in order to AF with them.


4

The biggest handicap you're going to have to deal with when using that lens for sports is the relative narrow maximum aperture. At the longest focal length, which you're going to be using most often, your lens will be limited to f/6.3. Even if you are in bright daylight, which will allow for proper exposure at the shutter speeds you'll need to stop the ...


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