10

On a DSLR, when you use the viewfinder, the mirror is lowered, and a secondary mirror reflects some of the light to phase-based AF and exposure sensors at the bottom of the camera. These are accurate and fast. When you use live view, the AF is contrast-based AF (the camera lens hunts until it find a position that maximizes contrast). This is slow (in your ...


9

Your lens is not parfocal. If you had a parfocal lens, you would know it. Mainly because the prices of true parfocal zoom lenses ($10K and up) mean only those who really need them and know why they need them buy them. A parfocal lens is a zoom lens that maintains the same focus distance as it is zoomed in and out. Most lenses used by anyone other than ...


8

In your D5100, "Live View" mode is activated by trigerring the 'Lv' switch next to the Mode selection dial (right under the 'Info' button). However, this information is covered in the manual of your camera. There you have it in page 99, section 'Live View'. If you are new to the camera, you should definitely go through it, it'll help you a lot.


7

Short Answer: Focus mode is how the camera focus while the AF-area is where the camera focus. Focus modes AF-S/One Shot AF - Find focus only once while the release button is half-pressed AF-C/AI Servo AF - Find focus until the release button is fully pressed or released AF-A/AI Focus AF - Let the camera decide if it should use AF-S or AF-C MF - The ...


7

It's because on a (Nikon) DSLR, live view is part of the video stream with rolling shutter. This stream is usually not in a raw format and is typically reduced resolution. Some Nikon's have a "silent live view photography" menu option that allows recording a video frame w/o switching into still mode (mirror/shutter fixed). In order to switch back to full ...


6

No, there is nothing you can do. Nikon's AF-P lenses do not work with the D5100. At the time of release of the first AF-P lenses (the 18–55mm, both with and without VR), the only cameras that supported AF-P lenses were D5300 and D5500, and a firmware update was made available to the D3300 so it would support AF-P lenses as well. See this article at ...


6

Because in the Nikon D3x00 and D5x00 series, as well as many previous entry level Nikon DSLRS and pretty much all Nikon 35mm film SLRs, the same mechanical motion actuates the mirror assembly and the aperture linkage. Once the mirror is up, the aperture can not be changed from the body. This worked fine when the mirror was always down until just before a ...


5

The mirror is interposed between the viewfinder and the sensor. The shutter is interposed between the mirror and the sensor. The mirror throws the image into the viewfinder, bypassing the sensor, so if you have a clear viewfinder image but live view (or an actual photo) shows a dark band, this suggests the problem is a sticky shutter. You will need to have ...


5

From the D5100's manual (page 81), the 600+ images is by the CIPA standard, and does not include live view — just 4 seconds of review for each image. It's not surprising at all that real-life usage is much less, particularly if you are using live view constantly. Sadly, I think your options are: Change your habits, or Pick up some spare batteries.


5

Note in your examples that images at row 4, columns 5, 6 & 7 and row 7, columns 7, 8, 9 &10 have a faint "white" bar at the top of the image. Increasing the brightness and or gamma on the sample supplied shows what appears to be a reddish line source. Doing the same on individual images may give you some visual clues as to what happened. The ...


4

You'll probably need to get it serviced. There are a lot of other things that could be wrong from that harsh of a drop anyway. Also, don't go to the same camera shop you went to. Replacing the battery made no sense at all for your scenario. They were either incompetent at their jobs or worse, just wanted to get money from you by selling a battery you ...


4

You are correct. The D5100 does not have a Depth-of-field preview functionality. If you take a look at the list of Nikon DSLRs, the one with the icons in the shape of an iris have that feature. The D7000 just below the D5100 on the list has it. Typically, this function does not make it into entry-level cameras. The best you can do it take a test shot and ...


4

You can use a wired remote release that has a built in intervalometer, such as this fairly inexpensive one or this one. Regardless of the brand name stamped on them, they all seem to be made identically. You then set the camera to Bulb and let the timer in the remote open and close the shutter.


4

This lens uses a screw driven AF, meaning the body drives the AF. The D5xxx series and D3xxx series of cameras need AF-S lenses in order to AF with them.


4

The biggest handicap you're going to have to deal with when using that lens for sports is the relative narrow maximum aperture. At the longest focal length, which you're going to be using most often, your lens will be limited to f/6.3. Even if you are in bright daylight, which will allow for proper exposure at the shutter speeds you'll need to stop the ...


4

1) I don't think that AI versus AI-S matters, as far as lens compatibility goes. The S was an extra mechanical feature that was developed just before electronic communication between lens and body was developed, so few bodies (maybe just one film body?) do anything with the feature. 2) It doesn't appear to be the case. From my own experience and other ...


4

The Nikon D5100 uses a rechargeable internal clock battery. It should have enough charge to give you 3 months to charge the main battery. A main battery that is almost completely empty, should also have enough power left to keep the clock running for months or even years. There is probably a problem with your internal battery, or a contact to it. The ...


4

Sorry to sound harsh, but these are the immediate problems that jump out at me The Highlights are blown The shadows are too dark The building is leaning on the left The building is not lit from all angles There is a mismatch of white balance The tree in the foreground is a distraction The roof isn’t defined Lack of sharpness Lack of clarity and contrast ...


3

This happens and while it has no effect on image-quality, it is quite distracting. It looks like you have quite a few and its a good time to clean it. They make special cleaning tools for that which is basically the same as a lens pen but smaller. The key is not to wet your camera because it is not weather-sealed. Otherwise you can even just rinse it which ...


3

You're looking for c2: Auto off Timers in the Custom Settings Menu. This is explained on page 160 of the Nikon D5100 Reference Manual — not to be confused with the abridged User's Manual, which leaves out most of the details. It sounds like you are looking to change Auto meter-off, which Nikon describes as the time the "information display remain[s] on when ...


3

Yes. Though you may have to fiddle with your camera settings a bit to achieve it. I did this once with that lens on a D3100. You will need to shoot wide open of course. Also zooming into your subject will make the depth of field shallower, which you will need to do for this type of bokeh on this lens. Also the size of the custom shape cutout is important. ...


3

While DXoMark's scores are never the only thing to go on, the general consensus of their results matches up with conventional wisdom, though not by as much as would normally be expected. Since the 55-300 covers a longer total range than the 70-200 it pays a slight price in overall image quality. When wide, the 300 mm seems to suffer particularly strongly ...


3

In AF-S, you can use Single-point AF (you select a fixed focus point) Auto-area AF (camera selects focus point automatically) When focus is acquired, there is no more focus tracking. In AF-C and AF-A, you have Single-point AF (you select a fixed focus point) Dynamic-area AF (you select a fixed focus point, camera tries to stay in focus by using nearby ...


3

I have a D3200, but I suspect they work the same with this. That button does double duty, both as back-button focus (in shooting mode) and as image protection (in reviewing mode). When the camera displays the image you just took, it goes into reviewing mode, so pressing the lock button will protect the image instead of focusing. Two possible solutions: ...


3

Many different things could be going on here but the most obvious is that you are shooting at a very wide aperture that will result in a small depth of field. Try increasing your aperture to allow for a larger range of acceptable subject matter. Something like f/5.6 or f/8 is a good range to try. Other obvious answers are covered already on this site many ...


3

Photograph a normal ruler, mm scale preferred. Then if your sensor is 24 mm wide (camera specs should say), and if the image shows say 20mm of that ruler, then the magnification is 24/20 or 1.2x (larger than 1:1 life size). Normally lenses show smaller than life size, like showing 40 mm on a 24mm sensor would be 24/40 = 0.6x magnification.


3

This is going to be generally hard. I'd suggest: Get as close as possible. 200mm on a "DX" camera isn't peanuts, but it won't bring you right to the action from a distance. Use the camera's "sports" mode. This situation is exactly what it's for. It will prioritize fast shutter speeds.


3

Likely your shutter curtain that doesn't make a full travel. Your camera needs to be serviced.


3

Most cameras have a capacitor or internal battery that keeps the clock and settings active while the battery is being changed. If the camera is left with a dead battery for a very long time, the capacitor or battery may become fully discharged and dysfunctional.


3

This is most likely a faulty orientation sensor. This is the sensor that supplies orientation information for the camera to record and write inside each photo's metadata. It's expected that playback mode is not affected as it just follows the same information for each photo and the "Rotate Tall" setting (which dictates whether portrait-oriented photos should ...


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