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11

These are definitely edited. The first one you note looks like it's had heavy retouching done on the model's skin, and the third one is definitely a composite of two images. That said, the fact they're edited has nothing to do with the camera... for these style of images they'd be edited and post-processed even if you had a $8000 camera body.


9

There is serious post-processing done as @ahockley said. What you seem to imply and I think should be addressed is that the Nikon D40 is not capable of producing outstanding images. Despite being entry-level, a D40, as all similar DSLRs, can produce almost any image which is possible by a high-end model when viewed up to a certain resolution (if the image ...


6

Lens doesn't matter much. Exposures will likely be long, on the order of a second or so, even with a fast lens, so use whatever you have. A zoom can be handy if you want to do abstract stuff (see below) I would suggest you set the camera to Manual exposure. Otherwise the camera will try to make all your images look like daytime. Start with aperture at f/...


5

So, the answer to this is "no", there isn't. You can disable it in some circumstances, but as you've seen, it will keep coming back on. The user interface of many entry-level DSLRs is designed around the rear LCD screen, and these cameras also generally don't offer a huge amount of customization. This is also the case on the D3100, which is roughly a ...


5

This is called Slow Sync, which is a technique that allows you to combine flash with an ambient light exposure. You probably turned this on by mistake. Generally, that's by holding the flash button (the one that pops up the flash) and turning the control wheel. Your manual is here, see page 47 (in the PDF, technically pg 35 in the actual manual).


4

According to DPreview it supports SD and SDHC cards. This includes all the classes of these cards. The classes only differ from each other regarding write speeds. Here is more information on that. As the D40x can not record video, a class 10 card is not necessary. A lower speed card is sufficient to take pictures.


4

You can try covering the panel with Rubylith, astronomers use this a lot to dim bright display. It has a dark red tint to it so you'll still be able to see the display but it should seriously cut down on the eye glare and even retain some of your night vision. (Just some, it isn't perfect.) If the display has a dimmer on it, if you combine that with Rubylith ...


4

The D40X is plenty good enough to learn from before splashing any cash. The main point is that it is free. You can learn exactly what limitations it has (if any) and use that as a basis to refine what you want from a camera system in regards to your subject matter.


4

Considering the D40 has a DX-format sensor (23.7 × 15.6 mm), you cannot shoot "full frame" with it - the sensor is smaller than a full frame sensor. If you have an 18mm lens with an F mount, you should be able to use it, but with a crop factor of 1.5, it's roughly equivalent to a 27mm lens on a full frame sensor body. If you want an equivalent focal length ...


3

The D40 has the older version of iTTL, where ambient exposure and flash exposure are metered totally independently - no matter how well your flash lights up the room, the shutter speed is still set so that ambient light would be exposed correctly just as if there were no flash. Newer version of iTTL (starting from D3 and D300) will underexpose ambient when ...


3

This is the solution for me: Buy and install the Delkin Pop up Hood that's made specifically for this model camera. It's actually a sun shade with a black cover for the LCD when not in use, but in about 1/2 second, you can pop up the cover to view the LCD if you desire. They cost about $12.


2

In my experience an f4-5.6 lens at 300mm is challenging to use, especially without VR. A tripod will certainly help, but hand holding was difficult for me in anything but very bright light. A potentially bigger issue though: Looking at the availble Nikon non-VR 70-300 lenses, I don't believe any of them are AF-S. This doesn't mean you can't use them, but ...


2

Right... this question and its answers has been bothering me for a long, long time. It's actually more likely that the first linked shot ("Mallory", back-3/4-lit by a setting sun on the beach) was done in-camera with a D40 (or one of its 6 megapixel Nikon stablemates, the D100, D70 or D50) than with another DSLR. And you don't need anything special, ...


2

Use ISO 100 and deliberately under-expose by two to three stops so that flash is the main source of light. Then you let the flash do all the work. Shutter speed in a sense becomes much less relevant because the picture is determined by the milisecond or so that the flash fires; thus, your shutter speed is the speed it takes for your flash to fire which is ...


2

Amusement parks are a great place to shoot night shots. There are all the colors and lights and you can do wonderful things with a tripod. This is a 3.2 second exposure at f10, ISO 100. I stopped the lens down to lengthen the exposure. Manual focus. It was a 17mm lens on a full frame body. This was a pretty easy shot to take, I only tried a few different ...


2

I suggest using a fixed focal lens because they have a larger aperture (let more light in). Start with the 35mm 1.8 DX lens. Because you have a cheap body that does not have an AF motor you cannot use the cheaper AF-D lenses and have to go for the more expensive AF-S lenses. Of course you could use manual focus (AI) lenses, but the light meter on the D40 ...


2

The camera needs a specific amount of light to take a properly exposed picture. How much light hits the sensor is tied to two items: shutter speed and aperture. Shutter speed defines how long light hits the sensor and aperture defines how much light hits per unit of time. If you want to avoid blurry images you have to set a fast shutter speed as you've done,...


2

According to Nikon's support page, Approved SD cards for D40, 4 GB is the highest-capacity supported SDHC cards. And note, "Other brands and capacities of cards may work, but Nikon cannot guarantee their operation."


1

there is one more thing to add: it also depends on the lenses you attach to it. I own a D40 and put a Nikkor DX AF-S 35mm 1.8 on it and it works marvelously. IMHO, Nikon D40 is everything a beginner could dream of. I know the answer comes too late...


1

Is 10MP enough nowadays? If you're not printing and only doing web delivery, it's plenty. If you are printing, you can probably go up to 13"x19" decently. I also see a [significant] difference in the ISO range. Does it matter? Depends on what you shoot. But since you're saying landscapes and cityscapes, probably not. This type of shooting typically ...


1

I friend of mine found a solution in this site: The frequency is 38,4KHz


1

They are relative numbers intended to shift color temperature by perceptually uniform steps. There is an underlying unit called the Mired and each step corresponds to an undisclosed number of them. This is in contrast with fixed steps in the Kelvin scale which would not be perceptually uniform.


1

That's a warmth adjustment that lets you "fine tune" the white balance for aesthetics (as opposed to accuracy). You might find that a value of "+1" (a little warmer, approximately the same as an 81A filter) gives more pleasing (or healthier-looking) skin tones than the flat "0" setting does, or that a +2 or +3 makes autumn foliage look better. You may find ...


1

speedlight.net reports at the end of this review that there are two versions, one with plastic and one with metal shoe. Perhaps the reason for the confusion about this is that one works and one doesn't? I would send a message to the manufacturer to find out for sure. e-bay reports a model "YN467" that does work, but it is shown in later pictures as the "...


1

If it makes you feel any better, my 7D with a 430EX acts the same way. I think in Aperture mode it considers it fill flash and does not factor it into the shutter speed. I found the best way to use flash is in M mode. Set your desired aperture and whatever shutter speed you need to freeze the action as you like. As long as your camera/flash has some form ...


1

When you say it doesn't fit, it does mount, doesn't it? Your N2020 will have the same mount as the D40. Does it rotate and click when you try to mount it? Assuming it does, there are two things to try: clean the contacts on both the lens and the camera (with a dry cloth, or if they're really dirty with a pencil eraser, taking care to not get bits inside ...


1

I had the 70-300mm non-VR lens, and it was poor. A very cheap build, and very soft at 300mm. I took sample pictures on a tripod at 300mm, and compared them to my 80-200mm at 200mm, and decided it was almost better to shoot with the 200mm and crop (in other words, cropping the 200mm shot so the subject was the same size as the 300mm shot, the 200mm was ...


1

I have been a nikon D40 shooter for years and all of my portfolio pictures were shot with it. so I encourage u to get the striking 35mm 1.8 which is very fast and produces stunning images. I will be ordering my own next week.


1

You are using your flash on 'red eye removal' Icon: thunder+eye, put it on normal flash Icon: just the thunder.


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