28

On page 1 of theNikon D3300 reference manual the [+/-] button pictured to the lower left in the image included in the question is listed as the: When shooting in manual exposure mode with Nikon cameras that have only a single control wheel, such as your D3300, the wheel - which is labeled the 'command dial' in your user's manual - controls the shutter speed ...


12

Don't use the camera's automatic "Easy Panorama" mode. Take the series of pictures manually and use desktop-computer software to stitch them together. This is a little more work on your part, but will be more flexible and probably yield better results anyway.


9

Unfortunately, that lens will not autofocus on your camera. Nikon make two basic series of autofocus lenses: those with "AF" in the name, and those with "AF-S" in the name. The "AF-S" lenses have the autofocus motor built into the lens, so can autofocus on any camera. The "AF" lenses (as yours is) require the autofocus motor to be built into the body, and ...


8

You have a few options - and they all boil down to getting less light into the camera: Smaller aperture using a smaller aperture (higher f-number) will make the image darker, it will also increase the depth of field (usually a good thing in landscape photography) and will reduce sharpness if you push it past a certain value (test with your own camera/lens ...


7

It's fine. Your camera will go into a low power sleep mode. I know people who never use the off switch and leave their cameras in this state all the time. Your battery may run down a little faster than otherwise, but that's it.


6

Your friend is wrong. You don't have to get a 55-something telephoto zoom, unless you don't want a gap in focal length coverage. A lot of us would say that the 55-75mm range probably doesn't matter, while the additional length of a 300mm lens over 200mm lens is probably worth it. If you do care about range coverage without a gap, then getting an 18-300 ...


6

Make sure you don't have live view on. Live view is a camera mode where you are able to view the camera's current POV much like the eyepiece, except that you are able to simulate your exposure settings / software optical filters (such as sepia and contrast/white balance enhancement) on screen (assuming your camera has a screen). If live view is on, you ...


5

Yes and no. :) Yes, it's a lot of money and overwhelming as a newb coming in. Think of it like having driven automatic econo-boxes all your life, and then getting a manual-shift sports car. The cost goes up, your insurance goes up, you feel conspicuous, and then you stall a bunch of times and feel like a complete idiot. It's not comfortable. Until you ...


5

According to DxOMark the D3200 and D3300 are very, very similar. The D3300 edges out the best performance, but it's such a tiny difference that it's safe to say lens choice and technique are the bigger differentiators.


5

It looks like either the sensor is broken, or possibly something is wrong in its data connection to the rest of the camera. Either way, there is nothing you can do about this. Since you just bought the camera, you may be able to return it, but that will depend on the seller's policies and perhaps on local law. Otherwise, call Nikon and send the camera in ...


5

Because of the way color is created from single monochromatic luminance values created by each pixel of a CMOS sensor, the pixels on the edge are needed to allow interpolation of the Red, Green, and Blue values for the next row(s) of pixels in. To have enough information to compute RGB values for each pixel on the edge, you would need an additional row of ...


5

Simply put: different class. One (D300S) is, albeit very old now, a pro/semi-pro body, the other (D3300) is a current (or almost current now that the D3400 is announced) entry level body. Comparing D300S to D3300 is almost like comparing apples to oranges. I'll try to break it down for you. What the D300S has over the D3300: Feature set (this covers all ...


5

It always make two sound (four, to be precise). The first (pair) one is a mirror hitting upper limit (and shutter opening) to free the path to the sensor and the second (pair) one is the mirror hitting the lower limit to reflect the light in the prism (and shutter closing). If the shutter speed is fast enough you cannot notice these two (four) sounds as ...


5

It sounds like you might have the two-second timer enabled. When you press the shutter button the mirror moves up. Then two seconds later the camera takes the picture. This is a useful feature when shooting from a tripod and using shutter times from around 1 second to 1/100 second when the vibrations from the mirror movement can actually affect the photo. ...


5

In A,S,P,M modes, you have to turn Auto ISO on, in Setup menu, see manual. Auto ISO is automatically ON in Auto mode, but is not automatically ON in A,S,P,M modes, not unless you turn it On. User has choices unless in Auto mode. In A,S,P,M modes, you manually open the popup flash if you want to use it, and don't if you don't. You set Auto ISO On if you ...


4

As a bird photographer (I was founder of the bird photography group on G+) I have to say that photographing birds is hard. The areas around birds tend to be clutters (leaves, branches, etc) and this can confuse the autofocus. Light is normally marginal so you need the large apertures, which narrows depth of field, so any auto focus mistake kills the image. ...


4

When you use a larger sensored camera, you're going to be working with a thinner depth of field either due to using a longer lens, or from being closer to the subject to get the same framing. The reason the Fuji and Nikon bridge cameras don't have as much trouble focusing is that with a smaller 1/2.3"-format sensor and a superzoom lens that has 500mm or so ...


4

There is only one major difference in the build of the D3200 and D3300. That is, the D3300 has no optical low pass filter. This should theoreticly result in better detail for fine patterns and the absence of the moire effect! A picture comparison can be found here. In the picture below, you can see that the theory suits practice pretty well. The pink ...


4

Since it is a very personal choice, only you will able to answer that for yourself. It will either prove to be the camera you prefer to use, or it won't. You won't be able to carry it in your pocket for example. :) The truth is that it will have much greater capability than point&shoot can show off, it can do whatever you know to do, but it should ...


4

The Nikon D3300 takes lenses with a Nikon F mount. I would also recommend looking for lenses that have focus motors built in (AF-S on Nikon brand lenses, USD on Tamron or HSM on Sigma), as the D3300 does not have a focus motor in the camera body. You can use lenses without focus motors but on the D3300 they would be manual focus only. In the ranges your ...


4

No, the D3300 does not support high-speed sync, (none of the D3x00 or D5x00 bodies do) so you're limited to 1/200s and below shutter speeds. Anything faster, and you will have black bars on the image. In addition, your (one assumes Neewer) TT-560 is a manual-only flash and cannot perform TTL or HSS, which is why it's so super-cheap. It only has the "sync/...


4

Your Nikon D3300 (and pretty much every other film SLR & DSLR) meters and autofocuses with the aperture of whatever lens is mounted on it wide open at maximum aperture. It doesn't stop the lens down to the selected aperture setting until the instant before the shutter opens to expose the image. What aperture setting is selected is immaterial in terms of ...


4

The Nikon 18-200mm F/3.5-5.6G IF-ED AF-S VR II DX lens will autofocus on your D3300. The important statement is: "Autofocus is available with AF-S and AF-I lenses". The secondary statement, "Autofocus is not available with other type G and D lenses," means that G- and D-type lenses that are not AF-S or AF-I won't autofocus on your D3300. The "G" in Nikon ...


4

Following is a list of some steps that may be helpful when attempting to determine whether your lens or your camera is broken. They are not guaranteed to find the cause of your problem. Rather, they are intended to direct your suspicions toward one or the other. The list is long, but if you're familiar with your camera's operation, it should be quicker for ...


4

If you look on the front of your kit zoom lens, you will see a marking with a number and a ⌀ symbol. This is the filter thread diameter — what front-side adapter lenses like the ones you bought attach to. I believe that on the 18-55mm lens that comes with that camera, the value will be ⌀52. That won't work with the adapter lenses you bought. (I believe that ...


3

Assuming you're talking about an SD card, there's a possibility with some cards with very easily shifted write-protect tabs to get shifted into read-only position upon insertion into certain readers, and shifted back upon removal, by any slight friction. I've had this happen a couple of times, and it seems like kind of a perverse design to me (I've actually ...


3

There is no definite answer to the question, unless anyone can find a teardown that shows the part number for the sensor. Nikon use sensors from Aptina, Sony, Toshiba and their own designs, many of which offer excellent dynamic range at base ISO (on a par with Sony EXMOR). I suggest you look at test results for the D3300 on DXO mark and ignore the sensor ...


3

The issues reported of AF detection causing 'hunting' and card issues do not appear to be lens related. The 'kit' lenses for the D3300/5300 listed aren't likely to be a vast improvement over the ones you have already (if indeed they're not kit lenses themselves for some models). That means to get any worthwhile improvement you'd need to head up the lens ...


3

I won't get into vintage camera gear values, but yes, you can still use EF lenses on any Canon dSLR camera bodies--the mount is compatible, as is the electronic communication between the lens and body. And if you like small and compact and want to stay in the Canon lineup, the SL1/100D (or any successor) may be worth looking at, but is unlikely to be found ...


3

This is the number #1 reason I never leave auto mode. It's too much hassle being forced to set the ISO sensitivity manually. It looks like most people actually prefer this. But if you don't, you can change the setting: According to this article, you enable auto ISO like so: Go to: Menu>Shooting>ISO Sensitivity Settings, and turn the Auto ISO sensitivity ...


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