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4

Without sample images and specific exposure information it's difficult to do anything but guess at what may be causing your issue. Long exposures aren't normally a problem. Astrophotography images usually are noisy and that usually needs to be processed out. Astrophotography usually tries to accentuate things in the sky that are normally hard to see ... &...


4

Longer exposure times (especially at a higher ISO) get super noisy and washed out like you said. You might just have to take more shots with a shorter exposure. Stacking 200 frames at 5" each might look better than 100 at 10" each for example, even though the total amount of time exposed is the same. You may also benefit from taking "dark"...


3

pre focus on a distant city light, or the Moon if out.


3

It looks like your example was severely underexposed. When the negative was scanned or a print was made from the negative there was an attempt to brighten the image to give you something more than a totally black frame. For exposures longer than one second or so, don't forget to account for the Schwarzschild effect, sometimes referred to as reciprocity ...


2

This really looks like the effect of post-processing. So, you get rid of it by not processing that way in the first place. You may have presets applied in your software which makes it seem like you haven't done processing! Open the original file with a simple image viewer to confirm that the glow is not there. If it is not, then try to reimport with all ...


2

The straight streak near top left is likely a meteor. I did an equalize of the image and saw several more squiggly streaks, albeit much smaller. My best guess is insects. The right hand one that appears to terminate at a star is probably a firefly type pulse that fades as it moves, the top one also fades but no distinct pulse, maybe faced away. To move over ...


2

Stars are at an infinite distance. Failing to find a brighter similarily distant object (like a far tower with a light on it, or the Moon for instance), you can set your lens to infinity and hope that it works. In reality you likely will have to use a setting slightly less than the absolut maximum focus distance (how exact depends on your lens / camera ...


1

Use a long exposure (with the subject sitting still) and a flash. Inevitable subject movement will cause blurring, but the flash fixes at least one sharp image in place. The light balance will be better if the natural light puts the subject in the dark: in that case giving it a -0.3EV flash (or even a bit more) will not give it overexposure. Use second-...


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