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The technique I use is: I keep "fresh" photos on laptop (with automatic daily backup). This is the period when I do most editing. I move "stale" photos to NAS (it is important you do the move inside Lightroom) since I do a lot of work in RAW I make sure to create smart previews - they stay local and function as a cache, limiting network traffic to ...


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Can you run the catalog on a NAS? Yes, you can. Does Lightroom (or Adobe) support this? No. The primary reason is likely because the Lightroom database can't be accessed from two different machines at the same time. There are temp files and other items in transit that the application depends on that would likely get corrupted if another machine attempted to ...


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How are you sharing the images? If you're running straight Mac OS X and using the default file sharing, that's probably a big part of the speed. If you want high performance file sharing, you need to either look into OS X Server on the Mac Pro, or look to add a dedicated file server like a NAS. Fast local disk for processing and significant work-in-progress ...


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Sounds to me that it is more likely to have been a failure saving the file over the network. Network backups are nice for archival storage, but horrible for live work due to the extremely slow load times for relatively large files. The process I generally use is to initially transfer my files to my high speed scratch SSD array (striped). I then ...


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I found the solution which worked for me. This Adobe help article explains the steps, which are as follows (added in case the link goes down): After backing up your catalog, relaunch Lightroom. Connect the hard drive (MyBook) that is repeating twice. Note: In this article, the labels—MyBook, Temp, Fred, and Mary—have been used as representative names to ...


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For RAW files you ca set Lightroom to use side files (XMP) to store the edits. Edit->Catalog Settings->Metadata and select "Automatically write changes into XMP" Then you need to transfer those XMP files to Computer B in the same directories where are corresponding RAW file. Unfortunately this work for all RAW files but not for DNG. Also it ...


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I do this today, but more old school style: I use Lightroom, but all my images, and the Lightroom Catalog, are stored on a portable hard drive. I simply connect the drive when I want to work on Lightroom. Doesn't matter what computer is connected, since all the data, and the catalog is on the portable drive. Just be sure to open the catalog on the hard drive....


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Basically this question conflates the carrying capacity of gigabit Ethernet with the overall system performance, which is why you aren't seeing the results you expected. The problem is not so much a case of being unresolved, but that the expectations were unrealistic. The actual throughput will be limited by the slowest of all the various data pathways ...


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Lightroom does not allow for catalogs being stored on network drives: No, you can't store catalogs on a network but you can store your photos on a network. Smart Previews let you edit your photos in Lightroom even when you are disconnected from the network or when your computer is disconnected from the drive that contains your photos. From Adobe's ...


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Daisy chaining thunderbold cables will not work. There is a maximum effective distance for those cables and you would well exceed it by trying to make a network over them. This would also sap all your speed. Additionally, gigabit networking should be more than fast enough for pulling over the files. Even a 100MB raw file should take under a second to ...


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I ended up installing SMBUp and dropped the built-in SMB system that Apple has created, apparently it doesn't implement all the protocols and functions necessary, so file enumeration is a bit flaky. With SMBUp, Lightroom on Windows is now importing images as expected.


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