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My antique wooden Kodak™ day-light loader (ca. 1905) was made with a removable spool of thin (now quite brittle) perforated celluloid with raised rubber edges. The film was sandwiched between the layers of the roll. The celluloid strip was wide enough to accommodate all sizes from miniature to very wide 128 (2½" wide!). The roll of film was wound inside ...


11

You might look at the Wikipedia Photography Technology timeline. A few key points from that reference: 1909 – Kodak produces 35 mm motion picture film on an acetate (less flammable) base 1913 - Kodak introduces panchromatic film (approximating the color sensitivity of the eye - older emulsions were not very sensitive to red light). 1925 - These innovations ...


9

Assuming you're scanning 35mm or medium format negatives, and that you want to use the full resolution of your DSLR to digitize your negatives/slides, you can't do it with your setup (D750 + 24–85mm Nikon lens) alone. Why? You have to think in terms of magnification (also called reproduction ratio). See also: What does "magnification" mean? How ...


6

Scanning handles removing the overall orange mask in color negative film. Scanning as positive, and then postprocessing invert does not remove it, inversion simply turns that orange mask to a deep blue overall. NOT Bluish, but very strongly deep blue. Then additional work to try to remove it. This is a difficult job to do in digital postprocessing (not ...


4

Questions about the orange mask of the C-41 and earlier C-22 negative color film keep reoccurring. Maybe I can shine some light on this subject. As you know, black & white film photography generates an image by chemically depositing a layer of metallic silver on film. This silver laydown is in proportion to scene brightness. This film thus displays ...


4

How important is the quality of the negative for Lightroom processing (Path A) versus conventional printing (Path B)? A good negative is a joy to work with. A bad negative must be salvaged, no matter which path you choose. If wet printing, you may find yourself tediously burning and dodging in order to milk just a tad more highlight detail from your nearly ...


4

Developing black and white 35mm film in the 1920s would have been similar to how it's done today. Here is what I found, along with links... It seems you've already done some research to determine that 35mm cameras, such as Leica A, were available in the 1920s. You can read a bit about 35mm film on Wikipedia (135 film; 35mm movie film). Note that preloaded ...


3

What's the preferred focal length to use (my 24-85mm lens) for this purpose? It's not so much about focal length when using a general purpose zoom lens as it is about what type of lens design you should think about using. People talk about macro lens, is it really necessary if I already have the above zoom lens? There are a few basic advantages to ...


2

I’m on mobile so forgive the brevity. How to read the code: https://www.kodak.com/uploadedfiles/motion/US_plugins_acrobat_en_motion_newsletters_filmEss_18_KeyKode.pdf A code list: https://evertz.com/resources/FilmID.pdf Your film: Vision3 500T


1

A macro lens is not necessary to get a scan but you get better results with a macro lens because you can get a better magnification level. Whether your lens (and the DSLR solution vs dedicated film scanner) is good enough for your needs, only you can answer that. Essentially you want to be close to the negative to fill the frame but you want to avoid ...


1

For 4 to 8 minutes -- 2/3 to 1 f-stop compensation is all you need apply.


1

It sounds like you are new to scanning. Hope this helps. 1) With any high res scan, choose to save as Tiff in the maximum bit depth that your editing software will handle. Probably 32 or 48 bit. With black and white, 16 bit is sufficient. 2) You must decide what size scan you want to produce before you set your resolution and output size. I find ...


1

This is what I would start with. You'll likely have to tweak settings to fit your specific needs. The main setting to disable is Digital ICE. The silver in B&W film interferes with its function. Original: Document Type and Film Type – These probably just set some reasonable defaults. What you've selected seems appropriate (Film, B&W Negative). Scan ...


1

The black-and-white film development method hasn't changed much since the 1920s. There are basically two steps for going from camera to a photo: Developing the film negative. This step doesn't require much equipment: Dark room, or a a darkroom bag (a black canvas bag that blocks light well). Film holder and developing tank. In a pinch, any glass jar with a ...


1

If your budget will stretch to it, you might have a look at a secondhand Bowens Illumitran (seeBowens Illumitran or do a web search for more details - a quick ebay check shows prices around £90 to £120 ($120-$160) for used ones. They were designed for copying slides, with focusing and flash illumination, and an optional contrast control unit. They handle ...


1

Looks like some crazy dust to me. See this question for some general cleaning advice: How to clean 35mm negative film? That may not help 100%, so after that, see if your scanning software has a dust removal feature. If that doesn't get you 100% of the way there, then you are left with spot-touching the image - known as the "Healing Tool/Brush" in ...


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