31

No, changing the exposure or using an ND filter will not help you with this, since both will only brighten or darken everything by a certain factor. Your problem is the large relative difference between the bright and dark parts, the dynamic range. And your eyes can capture a much larger dynamic range than the camera's sensor. In order to have a photo ...


29

You've got the sun almost in the frame. This is causing huge amounts of veiling flare — light bouncing all around, reducing contrast. You'll get better results from a different angle, or at a different time of day. Did you have a lens hood? If so, positioning the camera so the hood can better do its job would help. And, yeah, it probably isn't doing you any ...


20

I'd like preface my answer with a note that a tripod is not only useful in conjunction with ND filters — it also improves the results from image stacking as well. By fixing the position of the camera, the tripod eliminates changes in perspective, which can occur through minor motion while hand-held shooting a sequence for image stacking. Aside from fixing ...


14

Why did my ND filter produce washed out exposures? You're shooting straight into the sun with a dirty, unshaded, and flat surface on the front of your lens. The image demonstrates all three classic types of lens flare: Veiling - General loss of contrast due to strong off-axis light sources, often caused by such light interacting with dust, particularly ...


13

The advice you read is an example of the phrase, "A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing." There are filters known as Variable ND filters that are basically two polarizer filters stacked on top of each other. As the axis of polarization is altered between the two polarizer filters the total amount of light allowed through will vary. If an ND filter is ...


13

Well, with regards to your (1)... You could carry a light tripod (or beanbag or any other way of stabilizing a camera) and use only a single ND filter instead of several stacked filters. With regard to (2), yes you could do that, but stacking a sequence of discrete single images will give you a result that contains several discrete non- or less-blurred ...


10

I have to disagree (to a limited degree) with most the answers you've gotten. For a picture like this, a longer exposure will probably do a little to reduce contrast a bit. Not much, but a bit. This happens in at least a couple of ways. First of all, over the course of a 30 second exposure, the sun will move a little bit. That will do a little to soften the ...


10

Just a guess, but I don't believe that ND filters are so widely used as you assume. A very large share of the users of a specific camera will never need an ND filter and therefore not be interested in paying whatever extra it will cost to include the filter in the camera. To make sense, an embedded ND filter would also have to be variable, otherwise it ...


9

Is this combination of ND filter and long exposure responsible for having such even lighting on the scene in the former image? No. The reason for the ND filter is to allow the long exposure, but the reason for the long exposure is to "smooth" the stream. This combination is a popular stylistic choice when shooting moving water.


8

Graduated ND filters are usable with wide angle lenses. They should be big enough to cover the complete field of vision. There are certain wide angle lenses that have a protruding front element that make it difficult to use regular filters (Nikon 14-24 2.8). Polarizer filters are not recommended for wide angle lenses, because the bigger field of view may ...


7

I think a few of the existing resources on this website will already answer most of your questions. For example: Will Cokin-Z and HiTech 100mmx150mm filters fit on a Lee Holder? What is the highest quality graduated neutral density filter? Marumi ND2-400 Variable ND Filter Review What ND filter would you recommend? How do Cokin and Lee filter systems ...


7

It is impossible to say without trying the filter on the lens you intend to use it on and under the conditions you are going to use the combination. It is IMHO impossible just by a visual inspection of the scratch to determine wether or not it will or may have impact on the pictures you are going to take. If you can't try the filter before buying or are not ...


6

For me the main advantage is... Joy. I enjoy a lot more taking photos, people places, products, rather than editing the images, especially on automated tasks, like stacking photos. Of course, there are some parts enjoyable, like tweaking the final result. But, overall, I prefer not having a ton of shots to review. Taking a long exposure image on site gives ...


5

Most of what you seem to think was accomplished by using the ND filter was actually accomplished using one of several raw conversion/post-processing techniques to reduce the contrast of the final form of the image. All digital photos start out as raw image data that would be unrecognizable if displayed on a screen without any processing. The main difference ...


5

The issue is that with some ND filters and all polarizing filters, the light dropoff is not even as the angle of the light passing through the filter changes. This obviously is more pronounced as the lens angle is wider. So you get an uneven banding throughout the image. The secondary issue is that a really wide angle lens cannot use a filter without ...


5

If you have to use anything then I would suggest a lens hood. The only reason for that is because of the stage lights coming down and might bounce to cause a flare. Stages, with lighting, are designed to give a certain atmosphere for the performance so any additional changes defeat the purpose of that lighting. Now, depending on your location, you may ...


5

Obviously the two filters have totally different uses so you can't say one is strictly better than the other, but if you only buy one filter I'd say a polarizer is more useful as it cuts through the haze, enhances skies etc. it will also act as a 1 stop ND. Provided your camera goes up to 1/8000s you should be absolutely fine without an ND. The only use for ...


5

I'm going to provide a second answer to this question (there's nothing wrong in providing two answers). Somehow, the "landscape", "seascape", "cityscape" suggests me that you want to take wide-angle shots. So certainly you don't want the filter for 35mm f/1.8 lens. I would based on the "-scape" pictures suggest 72mm filter for the wide-angle zoom lens. As ...


5

The job of the lens is to project an image of the outside world on the surface of the digital image sensor (or film). Our desire is a faithful image. To date, camera optics do a good job but residual aberrations (lens defects) are present for all lenses. The simple fact is, a lens aberration happens when the image-forming rays traverse the lens and some of ...


4

No they are not comparable. They cause weird cross-polarizing effects and color-shifts while a good fixed neutral density filter has a very uniform effect across the image. Although a briefly considered one for its flexibility, I wisely decided against it and now use a 16X and 400X ND filter for my needs. I still have a 8X one which causes too much color-...


4

I think the biggest advantages of a built-in filter is being there all the time while the advantage of an add-on filter system is allowing different filters to be used. So you can think in the built-in ND as an "extra" filter that you can use without the filter adapter for simpler situations (where the 3 stops would be enough). And then use the external ...


4

The NIKON AF-S 24-85 F/3.5-4.5G ED VR lens has a filter thread size of 72mm. It's listed in the specs for that lens at Nikon USA. If you have other lenses that you may also be interested in using with filters in the future, you might also consider a filter holder system such as those offered by Cokin or Lee. Such systems are particularly an advantage, even ...


4

The equation is: f-number² illuminance × ISO value ───────────── = ─────────────────────── exposure time incident-light meter in seconds calibration constant Or N² = E*S*t/C, as you've summarized it with N as aperture on the left. Note that the calibration constant ("C") corresponds to your meter, not to the camera,...


4

With my long exposures, I meter for the scene and then add whatever ND amount needed and disregard the camera’s meter from there on out. That being said, it wouldn’t hurt to do some testing to determine more about your particular filter’s characteristics (I’d recommend using a digital camera for the testing). Take a regular exposure, manually adjust 10 stops ...


4

There are basically two ways to share filters between lenses with different thread sizes. You can buy screw on filters that fit the larger lens and use a step up ring to attach those filters to the smaller lens. You can use a system of filter holders that use adapter rings to attach to lenses with various filter thread sizes. You then use filters, many of ...


3

No, using an ND filter with or without a long exposure won't change the lighting of a scene or somehow make it appear to be more evenly lit. This is because an ND filter reduces the amount of light evenly throughout the entire frame thus affecting the amount of light that hits each pixel equally. On the other hand, if you were to use a split or graduated ...


3

It is easy to get lost in the specifications, if you do not know what they mean. The only one important to get an filter is the filter size. In this case, it is 58mm. Any filter with a 58mm size will fit on the lens. One common option though is to use a larger filter and a step-up ring. This can save tons of money if you have lenses with different filter-...


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