7

There are several kinds of artificial lights - fluorescent, tungsten, LED, halogen, xenon, explosives, electric arc etc. And there are also several different kinds of natural lights - sunlight, moonlight (sunlight reflecting from the Moon), light from other stars, fire, lightning, volcanoes, aurora borealis, glowworms etc. Obviously, both classes contain ...


5

Strictly speaking, if you could really emulate everything about natural lighting with an artificial light, they'd be exactly the same. Since we lack an artificial light source of the same intensity of the sun, not to mention radio triggers with a 93 million mile range, the best we can do with artificial lighting is to simulate sunlight. By locating an ...


5

I've tried to capture the rays of light in the forest many times, and have largely only had middling success. Eventually, however, I realized that the problem is one of contrast. The contrast between the dark forest and the bright light is what makes these scenes interesting. The solution is to increase the contrast between the rays of light and the ...


5

"Only spectrum" is a very major factor. The following only simplistically 'scratches the surface' of an immensely complex subject area: "Colour temperature" is a measure of the "warmness" of a white light source - this is a subject that rapidly descends in black (or white) magic and needs not be discussed here except as a means of comparing while light ...


4

I consider there are some rules for chroma keying. 1. A color that is the opposite of what is in front of it. 2. A bright color, mainly a primary RGB color. This way one channel will have enough contrast to be used as a mask. This limits the options to R, G, B but you could use bright orange for example and change the hue to extract a mask. This color ...


4

If you want a simple answer specifically regarding the difference between "artificial" and "natural" light: The breadth and continuity of the spectrum involved. Remember your physics classes. The color of objects we see is governed by how much light they absorb and how much they reflect, and the distribution of absorption and reflection across the ...


4

From a practical perspective, what mainly characterises the sun during midday, other than its spectrum, is the fact that it is an omnidirectional light that is shining from above, very bright (luminosity of 3.84 × 1026 W), and has a small angular diameter, 0.53 degrees, resulting in rays that are close to parallel. An artificial source with the same ...


2

On Screen When it comes to viewing photos on a computer screen, it really kind of depends on what device you are using. A standard desktop computer screen is going to be limited in terms of viability in direct sunlight. Most aren't really designed for use in those scenarios. These days, there are a number of personal computing devices that can be used for ...


2

The 2 lightstands is not a good option for reflective surface for locations. It is a waste of 1 lightstand anyway. And you have now a big parashute. Take a look at big foldable reflectors: https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=foldable+big+reflector&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj-9f2xrarKAhXKqR4KHSeyBGgQ_AUIBygB&biw=1177&bih=625 ...


2

You have to shoot raw and then work with the contrast in post to emphasize the difference between the darker and lighter areas of the sunbeams. It usually looks better when you can do this by increasing contrast between the darker and brighter areas of the sunbeams without crushing the shadows into black or blowing the highlights that are outside the darkest ...


2

If it is there, and you can see it... Try some bracketing and decide the best exposure. But your eyes are more sensitive, so you need some luck and get a really thicker fog. Depending on the angles, this could vary from one position to another, so move a bit. Theese rays are diferent if they are made of dust or smoke, becouse a dust one depends on fewer ...


1

You are most probably using Auto ISO. Turn it off, set the ISO to a low level (200), that will handle the pictures being noisy and grainy. You are in aperture priority mode (A), so you will have long shutter, so to avoid your pictures getting blurry, use a tripod. Or use better lighting.


1

When you say "ISO 200-2000" I assume you are using auto-iso, is that correct? Try using P mode instead of A, and select a 200 or 400 ISO.


1

Light is made up of particles emitted randomly from a lightsource. If the camera doesn't collect enough light this randomness causes neighboring pixels to be either too light or too dark which is perceived as grain in the image. So to get less grain you need more light. This is achieved by either: opening the shutter for longer, if your subject is ...


1

I think "Daylight Grayscale" may refer to the screen technology used in the One Laptop Per Child XO. This screen is color (albeit slightly muted color) when backlit, or higher-resolution black and white in bright light (like direct sunlight), no backlight required (but it can be left on; the stronger sunlight will overwhelm the backlight, changing the screen ...


1

Well, glossy vs matte is probably the biggest differentiator. A glossy screen or print is generally going to have more vivid color, but it also is going to suffer greatly in any kind of highly lit environment where reflections will be a problem. It also will be a problem when put under glass. Matte on the other hand is a little more subdued and natural, ...


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