16

If you want black, black velvet from the fabric shop does a really good job. Here is a sample tabletop, the full light is directly on it. This was a ISO 200 f/8 photo with flash. It is a better grade called dressmaking velvet, which does better than the cheaper grades. The fabric shop will know what you want. I don't know about using it in sunlight, try ...


15

I can't speak for all manufacturers, but can answer your point 2. Canon does. Their higher end models on the top mode wheel (e.g. auto, P, aperture priority/shutter speed priority and manual etc), also have from one to three C modes. These allow you to register and save settings, be it shooting mode (manual, aperture priority etc) down to their relevant ...


15

What you need, is Vantablack. This awesome material reflects only .04% of light - way too little to affect those silver halides. That being said, I don't think it's commercially available. Perhaps there's a similar knockoff on the market? All daydreaming aside, instead of trying to block all light from reflecting off the object and being recorded...why not ...


14

Use something with a matte finish or matte fibres. Take a magnifying glass to a fabric store along with a light and something to take reflective light metering with. Shiny synthetic fibres [and even some natural wools] might look black, but are at risk of casting bright specular reflections toward the camera which increases the apparent brightness. You ...


8

There is no real reason. Digital cameras could in theory cope with much more images. A number of models allow up to 9 but that is the most I've seen. The good ones allow you to confirm and retake each shot which makes this immensely workable. In any case you can do multiple exposures simulated yourself in most image manipulation software such as Photoshop. ...


4

Since it is a Ghost Tour, it would not surprise me if they made it special for the tourists with some tricks along the tour. When photographers use their in-camera flash it would be relatively easy to give them a photographic evidence of those ghosts in their own photos. It only needs an old film SLR camera with the rear "door" replaced with a flash unit. ...


4

I am quite sure that the answer is here: Is it possible to get a double exposure with a digital camera? Your wife's camera phone has a feature called "HDR", where it takes two pictures in quick succession and combines them, in order to better capture both bright and dark areas. It happens quickly, but if the subject (here, it's you) moves quickly, you'll ...


4

what the difference would be between using it and just using a single exposure at a slow speed The difference is that you can take several completely different exposures all in the same frame. There are lots of ways you can use it. For example, you could take a shot of a landscape and then a shot of a person against a dark background. The effect you'd get ...


3

Anything past one second, whether in a single exposure or over several multiple exposures of the same piece of film, are subject to what is known as reciprocity failure. It's also called the Schwarzschild effect after the man who extensively studied it in the 1890s, Karl Schwarzschild. The sensitivity of films at longer exposure times is not linear. This ...


3

Film has an exposure curve. I'm guessing that when you are combining many multiples the amount of light is insufficient to generate any real density (you are on the heel/bottom of the curve). For your simple division method to work you need to be w/in the linear response region.


3

What does sensors with automatic exposure bracketing mean? With respect to DSLR's and other mass-market cameras, automatic exposure bracketing is a feature where the camera will take several images in quick succession at different exposures by changing either aperture or shutter speed. It's hard to see how an image sensor by itself could implement the same ...


3

This is common on professional cameras that do not have direct dials for shutter-speed. On Nikon cameras such as the D500, you can enable Extended Photo Bank to add selected exposure settings to be part of the Photo Bank. On the D500 and D5 which feature modeless exposure mode setting, the selection is of the bank is done in the menu. On cameras with a ...


3

It is not possible with your 600D. You have to use additional post-processing software like Photoshop, Gimp or something else. Please see here: http://support-au.canon.com.au/contents/AU/EN/8201440300.html and here: Can one create multiple exposure images with a Canon DSLR?


3

One option for blending/fusing two shots would be to take two exposures (ideally using a tripod), one with flash/spot on the man (and otherwise heavily underexposed), one without the flash/spot (exposed for the background, keeping the man still + dark to avoid layering colour over B&W). You'd have to be careful to control the lighting in the area around ...


2

If you are taking pictures using the built in HDR mode, the camera takes multiple images and then combines them. This could potentiality result in some ghosting.


2

The Nikon D3300 does not have a built in multiple exposure mode. You can use multiple images from your D3000 and combine them using any post-processing application that offers the feature. The most popular software application that allows you to combine two images is Adobe's Photoshop.


2

The easiest way is probably to use "Darker" layer mode if hands are darker than the dial and "Brighter" if it's vice versa. Given that the images are the same except the second-hand, of course.


2

Generally, there's not a whole lot of love for double exposure in camera. It can easily be accomplished in post-processing, with finer control over exposure blending, masking out areas, etc. The only reason I can think of to perform it in camera is if there were restrictions against post-processing when you submit images (to publishers such as Nation ...


2

Re-winding film has always been a tricky, risk-prone operation. I know of people who would faint at the mere thought of re-winding a 35mm spool for fear that the film might get damaged or scratched in the process. After all, with 35mm rolls, you put your entire trust into two bits of felt shielding the film emulsion from the hard-plastic container, and from ...


2

There is no way to put a filter on a lens to filter out colour and produce a black and white image. Your best option would be to take a single photo with a regular camera and remove the colour from parts of the image using Photoshop (or similar image editing software). You don't have to blend two images together, you can simply select parts of the image ...


1

In some way you are just doing very high-speed, high-definition, compression-less video, and taking the output of several consecutive frames to make a still frame. Search for slow-motion cameras. The "Slow Mo Guys" channel on Youtube sometimes describes the cameras they use. You'll understand why it's not a technology for everyone. A slightly ...


1

No. It is not possible to separate the input images. The camera saves the exposures in memory and combines them to create the image file. It does not save a file for each exposure.


1

While there are multiple ways to do this, my preferred approach is exposure blending. You basically take multiple exposures from LR and blend them together in Photoshop using luminosity masks. You may not even need 3 exposures to get a satisfactory product if you start with the right settings in LR to generate the first image. I took the 3rd exposure you ...


1

Nikon D3300 ... use Image Overlay in the Re-touch menu. :) See: Image Overlay: Combining Images Together In-Camera (nikonusa.com)


1

This is not a feature you turn off. You only use the Start Shooting action when you want to use it. After you have taken the selected number of shots, the camera stores the composite image and you are done. When you shoot after the above completes, multiple exposure is off and it will shoot accordingly to the last drive mode selected.


1

A multiple exposure mode takes a given number of exposures and those are stored each in its own file on memory card. After the set is complete the in-camera program processes them into a single multiple exposure image. So, in reality, there is no "true" multiexposure happening inside your camera, but quite the same process as what you would be doing with ...


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