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15

When you shoot monochrome as RAW files, the monochrome setting is just meta-data in the RAW file. The raw data from the sensor is still the same. You will only see the monochrome effect when you view the file in a program that supports the monochrome flag. Obviously what you are using to preview the images doesn't support it. The program from Nikon for ...


12

This technique is called Selective color. Sometimes, you select a point (in this case, somewhere on the CD-R case), and the region around that point that is close enough to the same color retains its color, while the rest of the picture becomes black and white. Other times, as you mention, you can select a color and a tolerance, or a range of colors, and ...


8

Yes. As long as you are shooting RAW, setting the camera to shoot in B&W will give you a B&W JPEG preview on the LCD, but retain all the color data captured by the sensor in the RAW file.


7

If you are serious about digital B&W photography, you will probably use editors that allow adjusting the tones via multiple color channels. I find this superior to traditional glass B&W filters, because the flexibility is far greater and the effect can be individually tuned for each print. Multiple variations can be made and compared side by side. ...


7

I've re-thunk this since first posting ;) Best guess is he just used natural light, not through his kitchen window, as I initially had assumed, because he states he didn't take it to the kitchen. However, in the 1920s I would assume an artist would have an artist's loft*, with high, broad natural light... & a photographer would use one too, for ...


6

It's called Selective Color Although masking techniques can be used to create such an image, most of the time one can use a simple Hue-Saturation-Luminance tool that is contained in many photo editing applications to accomplish very close to the same thing with a lot less effort. Suppose I want to edit this photo to only show the blue in the sky and leave ...


6

Not sure how this fits in with e-ink, but there is a product category called "trail camera" that might do what you need. These are cameras designed to take pictures in the dark or light in response to motion and most should easily meet your one week power requirement. Although most of these cameras store the images on a local card, there are models that ...


5

It depends. If digital sensors had unlimited dynamic range it wouldn't matter so much, but we all know that they are limited by their noise floor. By using the color filter at the time you shoot, you can reduce a particular color channel that might otherwise be blown out while still preserving the brightness of the other two color channels. For instance, ...


5

A monochrome conversion is not feasible (it would require removing of the Bayer filter and a major rewrite of firmware). But it is not really necessary, as the monochrome conversion can be easily applied in post processing, and any increase of sharpness is - in context of modern sensors, which are not resolution constrained - Leica marketing hot air. More ...


4

While shooting in B/W with RAW mode might give you a preview of how would it appear in monochrome, but when you shoot in RAW no matter what effects you have applied during shooting, it will show the raw data from the sensor.


4

If I simply include a color card in the image. Will I be able to capture color information perfectly? No. A color target recorded in monochrome does not carry the information necessary to reconstruct color information. We can think of color as being comprised of three basic parts: chroma (or hue), saturation, and lightness (or value). When you record a ...


3

First, let's remind ourselves of what a raw file is. It is a set of single luminance values for each pixel on the sensor. As such there is no color information to a raw file. Color is derived by comparing adjoining pixels that are filtered for one of three colors with a Bayer mask. But just like putting a red filter in front of the lens when shooting black ...


3

After reading the entire Canon PowerShot G9 X User Manual cover to cover it does not appear that the G9 X will allow you to do what you wish. The Image Color Tones (My Colors) described on page 79 can only be selected when saving images to JPEG only. A note at the bottom of page 90 indicates the following: What isn't exactly clear is what happens if ...


3

It's not clear why you are asking, but the question strongly hints what you are trying to do isn't the way to solve the problem. It's been many years since I last worked with lith film. I have used it for exposure masks for other photolithographic processes like making circuit boards and silk screening T shirts. In all cases I experimented with the ...


3

Since black and white film records the overal intensity of light that reaches the film, colors that pass through the filter (orange) will appear brighter than colors that are blocked (blue and green), when used with black and white film. With color film, color-tinted filters will tint the scene with the color of the filter, unless further corrections are ...


3

With few exceptions, a filter passes the color it is named and checks its complements (opposites). We mounted a yellow filter on a camera loaded with black & white film to darken blue sky. We did this because often white fluffy clouds, usually back-lit, reproduced about the same shade of gray as did the blue sunlit sky. If we wanted a more dramatic ...


2

The filter you're thinking of is a Wratten #90. They used to come as gels, so you'd have to get a gel holder or just hold it and operate the camera one-handed. (Or just hold it in front of your face and don't bother with the camera.) Both of your cameras have a mode that desaturates the image before storage, which would let you chimp it on the LCD after ...


2

Record Menu -> Photo Style -> Standard (Change from Monochrome) Can be seen here: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicdmcgf3/5


2

Could I save power by using a camera with only grayscale detectors? No. You couldn't. Sensors are greyscale right up into the IR range and only become 'colour' with the application of a coloured filter array. The number of pixels in a sensor does not have an appreciable difference on power requirements and so switching to a monochrome camera is unlikely ...


2

As I understand it, your thinking is: e-ink displays save power by being monochrome. Therefore, it seems logical that one could also save power with a monochrome sensor. But, this is based on a false assumption. E-ink is low power because it is an entirely different technology, one which requires power only to change a pixel from light to dark (or back ...


2

Are you thinking of capodimonte porcelain figurines, such as this one, based on a sculpture by Italian Bruno Merli? The only thing I can find that comes remotely close as a monochrome photo is this picture of Prince Leopold, (1853 - 1884), (second from left), the youngest son of Queen Victoria, playing cards at Oxford. He was created Duke of Albany in ...


2

The resolution would be the same. The demosaicing algorithms involve weighted summing of neighboring pixels (essentially very specific weighted-averaging of 3-by-3 (usually) pixel blocks). But unlike other typical instances of pixel summing or averaging, sensor demosaicing does not involve a downscaling of spatial information. Now, because the demosaicing ...


2

You don't need to go to the extremes of attempting your own demosaicing, doing so would be a lot of work for no real benefit — all good raw converters use an algorithm that attempts to identify and exploit regions where the hue doesn't change in order to maximise the amount of detail recovered. In any case unless you are reproducing images at 1:1 ...


2

Y' in (Y',Cb,Cr) is called the Luma component, and on its own it represents a reasonable black and white image. But Y' is not an accurate representation of the actual Luminance; for blue and red objects its value is way too low. This is described as the Constant Luminance Error. For a better result the order of some operations must be changed; the wrong ...


2

No, but you could get a sturdy tripod and three colour filters (red, green and blue). If you shoot the same scene using each of the three filters, you can combine the three monochrome images to make a full-colour image. This is how the earliest colour photographs were made, and is the basis for the (three-strip) Technicolor film process. You can, of course, ...


1

Likely someone above my pay grade can explain it better – but here goes: When I went to school more than half a century ago – Color TV broadcast signals only needed to broadcast signal intelligence for two colors i.e. green and blue. The red value is gleaned by adding the green and blue and subtracting this value from the total. On an oscilloscope, the ...


1

It would seem it took him 29 peppers and countless of photos to get to that one. It is usually better than talking about how to take a photo, start taking them, developing and studying the results, annotating what variables you changed to get each results and your thoughts... you will have any amount of peppers to get to the one you love... and afterwards ...


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