37

This is moiré. It occurs because a screen is actually a grid of squares that are being used to make the image. When it ends up trying to be mapped to another grid of pixels (either by being captured by a sensor or by scaling) points of light or pixel data don't line up exactly. Some pixels get 2 pixels of information, some get the border between pixels. ...


23

Other users gave great answers about tuning your computer. However since you mentioned costco, this is a costco specific answer: I've sent many prints to costco and had great luck. However not so much, before I realized that they were "auto correcting" images. One batch of birth announcements I had to send three times because the color was "off" no matter ...


10

Gamut and color count are not really the same thing, although a low bit depth will start to affect gamut to a degree (i.e. a 6-bit flat panel will never be wide gamut, simply because its sampling of the color space is too sparse.) Gamut describes the range of colors, from the total Lab* space, that a monitor is capable of representing. Many monitors are ...


9

As your existing (+1) answer says, it's a Moiré pattern. But you see it particularly when the image is scaled. You don't say what does the scaling, but I'm guessing you're just zooming the display, or pasting into Word/Powerpoint/etc., in which case you may benefit from scaling the image using a different method in the GIMP (free), Photoshop (expensive) or ...


9

First Question If all colors are combinations of red, green and blue, and my monitor's pixels use all three, why is its color space limited to so small a portion of the actual complete color space? What colors are we not seeing and why? The answer to this question is (relatively) simple. I'm going to reference the sRGB color space (depicted below) since ...


8

Yes - you need to calibrate your monitor. One option, which is what I did, is to buy a relatively cheap colorimeter, at the time the Huey Pro was generally available. I used it as a travel colorimeter. Later, when I wasn't traveling as much, I bought a more expensive colorimeter (Lacie Blue-Eye Pro) for my home IPS monitor. I found that the cheaper ...


8

why is its color space limited to so small a portion of the actual complete color space? Because the "red", "green" and "blue" which your monitor uses are pale, probably not noticeable but still pale. You would probably not be surprised if your monitor used distinguishably pale colours and was said to have small colour space. No matter how pale the "red", "...


8

Yes, it exists and it is called pseudo-gray.


6

I would say that a wide-gamut display is NOT really necessary if you only intend to publish to the web. As you know, sRGB is pretty much the lowest common denominator for presentation on the web. Unless you expect the majority of your viewers to be using color-managed web browsers capable of properly rendering images tagged with AdobeRGB, there aren't really ...


6

Yes, there is a point. It will let you see your own photos more accurately. Since you do not print them, I assume you look at them on your own monitor. Even if it is only for others, non-calibrated monitors differ widely but they are improving at least in the mid-range with the advent of LEDs (and eventually OLEDs), so over time people will see your images ...


6

The reason that you get a black band across the screen is that you are using a shutter speed that is too short. The image on the screen is refreshed at a specific rate. This rate differs depending on where you live but it's either 50 or 60 Hz. There are also televison sets that refresh the image at double the rate; 100 or 120 Hz. The screen is refreshed ...


6

You are seeing the scanning of the screen. Try shooting an airplane propeller next! The exposure is made with a travelling slit so different parts of the image are exposed at different times and the movement causes artefacts. Even though the shutter is not mechanical, the reset and readout has the same effect, but more complex: while a focal plane shutter ...


6

When you work in 16 bits mode, the pixel data have 16 bits/channel, thus 65536 shades per channel. Your display has 8 or 10 bits/channel, thus 256 or 1024 shades per channel. The way you convert the source data to the display is by resizing the color space. You have different strategies called render intent. The more simple, the perceptive intent, is a ...


5

Actually, #E58C4E, if you mean the web color, is defined to be in sRGB. However, if you didn't mean that particular convention but rather "red:229, green:140, blue:78", it's a different matter, because the extremes (the "primaries") of each channel are different in different color spaces, so those numbers actually do represent something different in each ...


5

Thankfully LCD/LED screens are much easier to photograph than old CRT screens, but there are still a good number of things that can go wrong: Glare - this is light reflecting on the monitor and obscuring the image, move the camera around so you don't see the reflection or place something between the monitor and light source to block the light. Image too ...


5

No, the camera LCD is not better than a laptop screen. Often the gamut of the camera LCD is smaller than a laptop, too. This article discusses some of the issues around the camera LCD. Another factor that you didn't mention but should consider is monitor calibration. If your laptop's display has not been calibrated then you really need to address that first ...


5

Considering that an average monitor has about 6-bit per channel color depth (8 bit minus the dithering), I guess 10-bit is for color proofing/professional DTP/digital cinema. And higher than 8 bit per channel has another challenges: Video card: the video card needs to support color outputs more than 8 bits per channel. Considering that DVI supports only 8 ...


5

In theory, this seems fine, but a cheap color calibration device gives you steps 1 and 2 already done, plus 3 done with many, many more samples than a color chart, and 4 done automatically. I'm willing to bet that inaccuracies in the first steps plus the limited number of samples add up to less-than-ideal results. With a "real" colorimeter costing under $...


5

1) I have never seen any official information, but various people close to the LR development team indicated at numerous occasions that LR is internally using color space that they named Melissa, which has gamut of ProPhoto RGB, but different gamma. 2) No devices support entire ProPhoto RGB, but many, especially modern inkjet printers, exceed sRGB and even ...


5

The question is very broad and probably beyond the scope of an answer here. Entire books have been written regarding points 1-5 of your question. It seems that all of that is really just a long preamble to what it seems you may be really asking: Why sRGB images viewed via the Chrome browser do not shift colors when I change the color space on my system to ...


5

Some high-end, made for visual-arts work monitors ship with pretty decent color profiling from the factory. But if you're looking for a cheaper option, you definitely need a color calibrator. There's no way to even get close to matching output without one. But note that you're only going to get kinda similar. Monitors and prints are inherently different. ...


5

You have already pointed out the exact reason this wouldn't be worth the effort of implementing. The slight tint shouldn't be noticeable. The minute differences in brightness wouldn't be noticeable either. For example, can you read the text in this image? It has two neighboring 8-bit grayscale values. If you can see it, it isn't your eyes... your ...


4

I think the basic answer here is: you need to get a hardware-based calibration device and use that on both monitors. As you have experienced, it's really hard to get this right by eye. Getting the monitors calibrated correctly will help, but if one or both of them are really poor equipment, you still may have limitations. We've got some questions and ...


4

A lot of television pictures used in advertising are digitally added to the television so what you are seeing is not the actual camera output. I worked alongside designers producing consumer electronics catalogues and this was fairly standard practice.


4

The real key is going to be that you'll want true 8 bit color resolution rather than the 6 bits that most TN panels get. Off angle color changes is also a key issue when looking at choosing a good screen for any color sensitive work. Having a wider color gamut is helpful, but if I had to choose between a more limited color gamut on a S-IPS panel with good ...


4

There is no global color space. A color as you specify is just a triplet of Red, Green and Blue. Each component has a value between 0 and 255 (0 and FF in hex) which indicates how much power to give each LED for a given pixel (or phosphor in the days of CRTs). The scale is relative to your monitor and its current settings. This is why monitors need to be ...


4

[afaik] Unless the display driver or application being used applies a color profile or similar to compensate for the wider gamut, the color codes you use in your application will be sent to the display as-is. And in the display a specific color value (say E5) is no longer interpreted in the srgb scale but in the wider gamut scale. So why does the display ...


4

How are the extra pixels handled? By a process known as "resampling". Pixel brightness values are just samples of the pattern of light projected onto the sensor by the lens. Resampling means obtaining a new set of samples at different locations based on the original samples (the new set of samples in this case matching the number of pixels of the monitor ...


4

Taking an image "Outside" does not guarantee you D65 color temperature, unless measured. Also without having drivers adjusted to provide a D65 simulation on your monitor, the results can not be accurate enough to be called calibration. Even with the cheap calibration devices available it is difficult to sometimes get an accurate match between monitor and ...


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