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It's more complicated than this because: Moiré appears when there is a slight difference of spatial frequency between the image and the sensor. But the cones and the rods, being organic, are not in a neatly equally spaced grid so you cannot define a spatial frequency for them (or at least there is a frequency range so the moiré is severely attenuated). Our ...


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Absolutely, it is possible to capture a LED screen in-camera without moiré. The Mandalorian show is filmed in a 270° cylindrical projection room, called "the volume" by the production team. Rather than using CGI in post, the scene's background elements are projected in real time on the LED screen, and captured at the same time as the actors in ...


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The Moiré pattern you see is an artifact of the sampling frequency of the camera relative to that of the photographed display. If the camera sensor's resolution isn't somewhat close to that of the projected image of the display, you won't see any Moiré, or the pattern you do see will be comparable in size to the screen itself. One simple way to avoid this ...


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With regard to moire, not really. Both Bayer masked sensors and Foveon sensors have regular grids of photosites that contribute in a large way to moire. Cones (and rods, for that matter) in the human retina are not distributed in such a regular pattern. So in that respect, there's a fundamental difference between human retinas and any kind of digital camera ...


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