Hot answers tagged

117

At the sort of geeky/cosplay events you describe a good solution might be to wear a T-Shirt which addresses the issue. Here's an example I found with a quick search. This should do a few things. To attendees it helps you look like "one of us". It indicates you are relatively serious about your photography, not just a random person with a point and shoot. ...


37

It's not the camera they have to take seriously: it's you. Get past the shyness. You're all fans/reenactors together, you already have an instant bonding point. Appreciate the costume work they've done. You don't have to fake anything. Just be willing to put yourself forward and ask. Show folks what you're doing and get them involved as collaborators in ...


28

I'm going to throw lots of ideas at a wall and make them stick. But changing cameras because it doesn't look the part is wrong. Use what is right for you. Start with an introduction, and offer to show previous work. Whenever I make first contact with a model (granted it's online), I always introduce myself and provide examples. My business cards; each one ...


26

You've got to show them examples of your work that make them want you to produce similar work with them. In other words, you need a portfolio that demonstrates you can make it worth their time and effort. Of course that poses the question, "How can I build a portfolio if no one will work with me?" You have to start small. Check among your friends or family ...


25

The models are obviously seeking maximum exposure. They'll assume the people with several thousands worth of camera gear on them will be selling/providing the shots to magazines, big blogs, etc. Meanwhile, you with your little point and shoot look like you're adding to your own personal photo album/portfolio. If you are providing these shots to somewhere ...


22

No. It is fine. That is pretty much how things work. A model provides contact information for them to be contacted. You send a brief description of what you have in mind and they will let you know how to proceed from there. Models do not necessarily do all their modelling under a single agency unless they have an exclusive agreement and even that it may be ...


18

Tell them to come back at the next available appointment time when they have followed the instructions you gave them. Seriously. The only way to deal with this during production is to ensure it is dealt with prior to production. Make sure the client/model acknowledges at least a day in advance that they understand the need to wear loose fitting, non-binding ...


15

First question: Use Photoshop. You can retouch ('beautify') them by using various tools - there are plenty of tutorials on the net for this. But be sure to not show the unprocessed photos. Also you can use artistic filters to give a vintage, art mood. ...Or, see here. Use Light & shadow. Use an artistic/mood light. Play with shadows. A harsh/'...


14

I don't think it's about how people view your camera, it's about how people view you. If you're using an X-T2 and a 55/1.2 lens, it's quite enough for portraiture and the camera is capable of excellent results. However... You describe yourself as "I'm this petite girl with a 'tiny' camera." Think of yourself as a confident woman with a first class camera ...


12

Model Mayhem is used well known website to find models. You can find not-so-well established models who will model for free in exchange for head shots. It is a good way to start out. Another option would be to join a local portraiture meetup group in your area. They normally share the cost of the studio and the model when doing a shoot.


12

Other than adding a battery grip or flash, you can't really make the camera larger, so it seems to me that your best options are to either prevent your subjects from judging the camera, or challenge their judgement: hide the camera: When you approach someone to ask them to pose, keep the camera out of sight. If you wear the camera on a strap, slide it ...


11

If you want the ultimate in recognition (whether rightly or wrongly) of being the baddest pro at the geekfest, get a couple of friends to be "assistants" and be your "voice activated light stands." Give one a monopod with a speedlight and small modifier on the end and the other a 30-40" reflector set to carry while following you around. And since you'll have ...


10

One trick I picked up from Zack Arias is to get the person to "move in" to the expression; you time your snap right to get the expression at the right moment. For instance, he'll have the model close her eyes, and then have her open them. Between the time she's in the resting state of eyes-closed and the posed-looking state when she's conscious of the ...


10

It sounds like you haven't worked much with models. If not, it'll be an interesting journey. It's convenient to make a broad categorization of models into two groups: 1) Professional models, represented by an agency; and 2) People who model but are unrepresented, part-time, etc. If you want to be reasonably sure your model will be on location when he or she ...


10

Is there anything I didn't think of? Perhaps the difficulty you might have in convincing the police that you only intend to take photos and that you never had any intention of having sex with a person who is known to take money for sex. Is this ethically acceptable? I don't think so. Most telling is the phrase you used: I had the idea of booking an ...


10

...This sounds like an awful idea and for one reason that the other answers don't mention: Model Release You want to hire Escorts, that may or may not understand the reason you're hiring them. To do nude work with a tourist that doesn't speak the same language. Then you presumably want to be able to use it in your portfolio and publish it.. Without a ...


9

When you hire an escort instead of a model, you will not hire a model. Speaking the same language is one part of communication, but certainly not everything. Being a model means experience in posing, in being directed how to look, how a photoshot goes, etc. It's a profession. It's what a professional photographer appreciates. If the language they speak is ...


8

Well, one can write an entire book on this. Also there isn't a definitive answer. But, as you say, here are some "tips and tricks": make it clear that you're on "their side". That you're helping them to make the shoot good. arrange a little their clothes, their hair, take an invisible piece of dirt (it doesn't need to really exist) from their clothes - this ...


7

When I did a studio photoshoot, part of what was included in the basic package was a large fan unit. I suspect that a leaf blower is giving too direct a jet of air that is mainly being attenuated by the model's face (hence unable to keep eyes open) and then little kinetic energy is transferred to her hair. The unit at the studio was a very large fan (...


7

Are you posing or do you have a model posing for you? Most likely, professional photographers are going to employ professional models, either those who they've worked with before, or by going to a modelling agency for a suitable model for the type of shoot and the type of end result that they're trying to achieve. Professional models usually have an ...


7

Is working as a model a good way to learn photography? It can be, sure. Rather, if the question were more specifically, "is working as a model a good way to learn portrait photography?", sure, why not? Depending on some conditions, that is... Is the photographer good? Is he experienced, does he know how to communicate with and direct models? Does he know ...


7

Check your local arts and painting classes to see if they have nude modeling classes; go check them out and ask the models directly. Have a clear notion of what kind of nude photography you want to do (boudoir, nude, sexual or not...). As Michael wrote, have a small portfolio available to show potential models.


7

How do you feel about photographing yourself in the nude? No, I'm not suggesting the typical selfie (selfy?). I am suggesting that you take the project on with all the deliberation you would photographing a model. Light, accessorize, pose, and compose for your optimal effects for your available "model." I think it will present some significant and relevant ...


7

Consider using an off-camera flash, with a portable flash modifier. I was helping my Dad take portraits of my mom at a Christmas lights show at night. I put a radio trigger on his, and acted as a voice-activate light stand with a fstopper flash disk on the flash. You'll be amazed how may people think that we're pros, and we got some nicely lit photos to ...


6

I made this a public wiki so we can keep a master list Work from a printed checklist. Especially with gathering all the raw-material images, make sure you get everything. Shoot the model with a mild telephoto lens even if you want wide-angle overall, and composite. Shoot to plan on compositing: shallow DoF makes it easy to use select in focus in Photoshop. ...


6

DeviantArt Flickr ModelMayhem 1x 500px jpgmag (.com to all the above) eroticsignature.ning.com


6

I'm assuming you are a photographer, and you interact with people. Saying "That one", "good", "extend your leg", "nice", "gorgeous", is part of interacting with people. I don't think any model, not one on the planet, would learn 1000 different names, with 1000 variation levels on each to pose, and to practice that pose to be just the perfect canonical "...


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