12

YOU as the photographer never need a model release. It is the end user who is going to publish the image, and potentially violate the model's rights, who needs the release. You as the photographer cannot violate your own rights as the model. If you were to license the image to a publisher they could/would need a release signed by you as the model. Edit: if ...


8

I don't think your jurisdiction even matters. Let's take a common sense approach. You have an image of yourself. It was taken by some photographer. You think this is a very good image and you want to add it to your portfolio. Here are the possible scenarios when adding the image: You do not need the permission to do this, but the photographer does not ...


7

She took the photos. She owns them. She gave you a copy of them, but they're still her photos. If she were to use them for commercial purposes (your image in advertising) you might have more of a lever to stop her, but basically, she can do this. Whether she should over your objections is an ethical but not a legal question. This is why things like this ...


6

Short answer, sometimes. If you only intend to upload them online, then you generally don't need written permission (some websites do require it though) however it can be a good idea to get permission anyway especially if you are photographing people you don't know well or at all. This will protect you should someone change their mind about having his/her ...


6

Obviously, you need one signed form from each model, but otherwise it depends on the wording of the release; you could have one that covers multiple shoots. Just make sure that this fact is communicated clearly. In theory, a model could claim they just signed something at the first shoot which they were told is "the standard model release" and that they ...


5

I did a quick Google of "Canada Model Release Law," and found this info: Why does it matter if the model is a minor? If the model is a minor, he or she will need parental permission to approve of the use of his or her image, likeness, or sound. How do you define a “minor”? Within the context of the Model and Entertainment Release, a minor ...


5

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. Assuming you are in the U.S. If she is using them to promote her photography ...


5

Like pretty much any legal question, this depends of course on the jurisdiction. In many European countries, the photographer would be violating your rights by publishing pictures of you without your consent (Droit à l'image, Bildnisrecht). However, in the common law legal tradition of the UK and the USA, these rights are generally not recognized.


5

I believe as I am the copyright holder this would be OK, even if there is no model release, right? Or would I have to make them sign a model release so I could use the photos of them on my site? Regardless of what you can get away with under your local laws and the terms of your contract, why would you use those photos against your client's wishes? As a ...


4

You're confusing copyright licencing with model releases, they are separate and not actually related. Licencing and copyright govern who is permitted to have the images and if/where/when they can reproduce a work. A model release indemnifies a licensee should they show the subject(s) endorsing a viewpoint that the subject does not hold or shows them in a ...


4

This is not a legal advice!!! If you want to license the image (to magazine, stock agency, etc.) yes, you need model release. You as model should sign it to yourself as photographer.


3

Standard disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. I am not giving any legal advice, other than to consult a lawyer in your jurisdiction. A basic way to go would be to gather the minors personal informations on the model releases to help identify them, and get both of their parents to sign them (again, along with their personal informations to identify them clearly). ...


3

Standard disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. I am not giving any legal advice, other than to consult a lawyer in your jurisdiction. In most states in the US, minors do not have the capacity to contract. Contracts entered to with a minor are voidable at the discretion of the minor. If you wish the terms of the contract to be enforceable on all sides (i.e., to ...


3

Ultimately the only truly useful answer will be from a lawyer who specialises in copyright in the relevant jurisdictions (probably wherever it is going to be published, possibly also where the photographs were taken). That said, I think the general concept you're looking for is whether it's Editorial use or Commercial use. The former tends to be things like ...


3

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. Since the questioner indicated they were located in the U.S., this answer assumes ...


2

Maybe you can offer the cat owners a small percent of the profit in exchange for property model release permission.


2

I'm not sure. But you probably signed a "model relese" document. In this kind of documents the model renounces some rights to comercialize, demand, ask for aditional remuneration, complain for the use or ask for removal, etc. See if you have a copy of that. If this is regarding only for asking remuneration and not "all use" you can use them as a personal ...


2

You would need permission as the work is their copyright, however you could propose that you credit back to them. The photographer may feel a benefit in getting additional publicity for their work. I wouldn't mind as long as I'm credited, however I am not a professional photographer


2

The following is for entertainment purposes only. Contact a lawyer if you have serious legal concerns. Contact a lawyer to determine whether you actually need model releases and whether an opt-in or opt-out system would be most appropriate. While "bulk model releases" with opt-out might save on paperwork, they would be inappropriate if you have significant ...


2

No, you do not. The company will want to have them, though (for their use of the photos). Generally you need release forms to publish, not to shoot.


2

No. Model releases aren't used much in the UK.and there's no legal requirement for one. However you may want to have a contract drawn out between you and the organisation to protect everyone involved's interests and probably a licensing agreements also (detailing usage and what each party is entitled to do). However usual stack disclaimer. I'm not a ...


2

You are the parent, you are the photographer. Unless you plan to sue yourself for using an image then no. Flippant answer aside i would think that any publication or contest would require a model release form.


2

I am not a lawyer. I recommend hiring one. It is a cost of doing business. Client fees should cover both overhead and profits. In terms of interior photographs of a restaurant, the simple solution is to hire people to pose as patrons using ordinary casting methods and standard model releases as recommended by your lawyer. Doing so will avoid ...


1

Just because you've paid doesn't mean some automatic rules come into force. As mentioned in the comments above, it depends on the specific agreement between you and the photographer. So, what did you agree with them? If this is a real situation and not just hypothetical, and the photographer is arguing that you don't have legal right to use the photos as you ...


1

I can not speak to the legality of it but i can say from experience that just because a face is not in the photo does not mean the person is not recognizable. I posted a photo on my smugmug page that was of two nudes in embrace inside the grand canyon, shot from a distance, meaning they only filled a portion of the frame as the surrounding red rock canyon ...


1

One of the classic cases referenced in all of the photojournalism textbooks is Graham vs. Daily Times-Democrat from 1964. Ms. Graham was exiting a funhouse at a county fair when a photographer from the local newspaper snapped her photo just as she passed over a grate that blew up her dress and exposed her underwear. The paper published the photo with the ...


1

I'd also suggest that you countersign the model release and pass a copy back to the model for their reference. People often forget they signed something and sometimes try to shift the goal posts. Also useful, if in the future you wish to do something else with the images outside of the original contract, you can then send them the original copy with any ...


1

Maybe you can have a look at iStocks Model Release. That's how a contract is written to allow usage. iStock MR


1

It depends. Dan Heller's model release primer (and other articles) give a lot of background and things to consider. To quote Dan, in short, You never need releases to take pictures. You don't need releases to buy or sell pictures. [...] How a person or thing is "portrayed" is what determines whether a release is required. Whoever publishes ...


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