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39

The darker vertical bands? I would ascribe them to a synchronization between sensor capture and a slightly flickering lighting (one aspect of the "rolling shutter" problem). Is the exposure time of the picture roughly three periods(*) of your local current frequency (1/15-1/20 of a second)? (*) At least three bands in the picture, beside the two obvious ...


10

To expand on xenoids answer. Most phone cameras use what is known as a "rolling shutter", the exposure starts and ends at slightly different times for different parts of the image. This makes the sensor cheaper because the end of the exposure can be defined by the readout process rather than needing extra electronics to capture the image at the end of the ...


8

A quick search indicates that that "12MP + 12MP" means exactly that: two 12MP cameras. One is a "standard" camera, for the other several possibilities exist (depending on maker): monochrome, wide angle, or tele lens. The 8MP is a 3rd camera facing the other way (for "selfies" while watching the screen). I would expect the phone info tells you what that ...


7

Portrait Mode images saved by Google Camera contain the original image and depth map in the metadata. They can be extracted with exiftool: exiftool -b -ImageData image.jpg > image.gimage.jpg exiftool -b -Data image.jpg > image.gdepth.jpg Google Cardboard panoramas contain audio and 3d image data. exiftool -trailer:all= image.jpg -o image.1.jpg ...


4

Short answer: not yet, but getting better. There is a current trend of putting multiple camera assemblies with different focal lengths in high-end smartphones. These tend to have one moderate wide-angle lens (as is typical in single-camera smartphones) and one which is closer to "normal". For example, the iPhone X features two lenses, one with a 28mm-e* ...


4

Unfortunately, Huawei never did respond to my query relating to this question. As such, I am non the wiser as to why fbt is sometimes automatically populated to some of the photos taken in selfie-mode. Online searches bring up suggestions that this fbt refers to some optical related piece of hardware as well as the Metadata entry being a glitch in Huawei's ...


4

Ordering, or renaming, by timestamp is the obvious solution. But you have to take care to set the clock on your DSLR correctly, especially if you travel to different time zones and have your phone set to automatically obtain the network time. There are various tools available to batch-change timestamps later, but that increases your workload, of course.


3

The simplest answer is to use photo management software to do the work for you, rather than worry about file name conventions. Applications such as Apple's Photos (especially if you're on an iPhone), Google's Photo management (if you're in the Google ecosystem), etc., make it trivial to manage your photos from multiple camera sources. Edit: You state that ...


3

If you save the original picture to your computer then the information is still there. Use this tool to refocus on your computer: https://github.com/photomedia1/jpg-refocus-tool


3

Pretty much, no. The Huawei P9's dual cameras are actually capturing two entirely separate images and then combining them, with a bit of software processing, to simulate the effect of adjusting focus. On the assumption that you're downloading a JPEG or similar from the camera, you've reduced yourself to just one image and thrown away the extra information ...


2

Felix's suggestion is more user friendly, but if you want a simpler, command line solution which just separates out the various frames of data you can try: https://github.com/jpbarraca/dual-camera-edof


2

Unfortunately, there’s currently not a way (in version 3.1.0 for iPhone) to select a group of photos and then apply the same keyword(s) to your selection. However, there is a feature to copy one photo’s keyword(s), and then paste these to other photos in your album, one at a time. Go a photo where you’d like to start. Go to the Keywords view, if you’re ...


2

I found on the Google Play Store a port for Android of exiftool, named (no surprise) ExifTool, that gives you a command line interface to the well known tool. It's not as comfortable and quick as one would expect from a mobile app, but it works. Workflow: Tap on the 3 dots menu and choose Execute command Type or paste exiftool -tagsfromfile source -...


2

Generally no. The camera on most cell phones provides a field of view equivalent to a 28mm lens on full frame, give or take. That's roughly like the field of view of the long end of 10-20mm on an APS-C camera (15-30mm-e, or a little narrower for Canon). But it doesn't give you a good sense of the wide end, which I assume is most interesting. There are a ...


2

Canon Camera Connect does not list support for raw Canon .CR2 files. This is probably due to the much larger size of raw files versus compressed JPEG files. Some Canon cameras, including the EOS 6D, have the ability to do some raw processing in camera using the camera's LCD screen. You could do things such as color temperature in camera before saving as a ...


2

In order to attach a filter to a lens, there needs to be some sort of attachment method. In the kit you linked, the ND filter is a separate "clip-on" attachment to your phone. This means that it is not inherently designed to attach to a lens, but to your phone. Some rigging may be possible to get it to work, but it's not in the design. Here's another ...


2

On small focal lenses (and the small sensor size of the phone requires small focal lengths), there is a very wide depth of field, so you don't get any significant background blur. The second lens has a different perspective from the main one, and software can deduce the distance of objects from their difference between the two images, from which you can ...


2

As the other answers note, this is due to a beat frequency between the readout frequency and the flicker frequency of the lighting. You should check that the country/region of your phone is properly set. Also check the camera app for a power line rate in the settings. A properly designed phone or video camera is able to compensate for lighting flicker by ...


2

Unless you have a multi-camera phone with a very strong telephoto option, the moon is much too small in the frame to give usable results even with modern, high resolution sensors. A single camera phone will have something like a 24mm or 28mm equivalent lens. Which will make the moon look tiny in your frame - digital zoom will only help you magnify it a few ...


2

Some light sources that reflect in the glass are visible at about the same brightness even where the dark bands are - that almost excludes a camera problem. Effects like that are not uncommon with certain brands and models of LED and/or CFL lights, either because PWM dimming is used or because the actual light source is fed rectified but unfiltered mains ...


1

I've used both Snapseed and Lightroom for some time. I also made prints from images that were post-processed in Lightroom and processed in Snapseed. As I recall, I never noticed a visual "quality" drop by Snapseed. When I browse (digitally) my final images and show them to clients, no one can tell which ones were edited in Lightroom, VSCO (another mobile ...


1

No. There is no such comprehensive database. Many phone manufacturers only provide the marketing information, and even that is often scant. Maintaining such a database would require constantly buying and tearing down phones as they come out. Because the desire for such data is very niche, that is not sustainable.


1

The process of using color charts require to take photos in RAW. This is because of few factors: Using charts you can tune white balance of the photo. And in JPG you have already set/incorporated the white balance. To get precise colors you will need more information than JPG can provide (more than 8 bits per color). The process of using color charts ...


1

Here is a workaround that is not optimal for your problem but better than nothing. You can tell A Photo Manager to store meta data changes in jpg and in external xmp file. When your external app deletes the meta from jpg the info is still present in the xmp file and can be restored from there. Note only the 7 most important meta fields DateTimeTaken ...


1

Lens apertures are expressed as a mathematical ratio. F#, f-number, 1:#, and f/n (ex. f/2.2) are unambiguous ways to express the quantity as a ratio to the focal length. It does matter how lens apertures are expressed. Not enough information is provided for a qualitative assessment of any specific setting compared with another.


1

So it would be written as f/1.8 or f1.8? Doesn't really matter. E.g which one is better f1.8 or f2.2? 1.8 lets in more light compared to 2.2, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's better. Also, aperture is not a factor of a camera, it's a characteristics of the lens. The lower number actually means a bigger aperture and vice versa. You'd adjust the ...


1

I have to make a ported application called ExifTool on Android. You can easily download it and try to extract the depth information or export the binary file from a photo. Link download: Exif Tool on Android How to use: Open app. Choose a photo that have Depth Map data. Tap to XMP tab, then see the DepthMap thumbnail, ImageData thumbnail. Tap to DepthMap ...


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