32

The dust isn't on the lens — it's on the sensor. Dust on the lens will not resolve so clearly. To check for it quickly, set your aperture to the smallest your lens can support. (Small apertures have large f-numbers, like f/22.) This will keep the light striking the sensor to a straighter angle, which in turn will make the dust (which sits on filter layer ...


24

you don't have to reproduce the algorithms that the camera is running to render your photo on the small display on the camera. This all depends on how much you value what is shown on the camera's LCD - it isn't any more "right" than any other algorithm. If you personally happen to like Sony's algorithm, then you may find it advantageous, although you can ...


14

JPEG, as you know, is a lossy compression format. One feature of the format is different quality levels, which correspond to greater or lesser amounts of information discarded to save space. See Is it worth using Pentax's Premium JPEG quality setting? where I did an investigation of various quality levels and their tradeoffs — it's a different model and ...


9

Not a problem with your equipment. They are reflections of the clouds. Non-smooth water will cause vertical smears. The effect is subtle here, but it is more obvious when the sun is reflected. Why does sunset over a body of water cause a path of light stretching towards the horizon? Edit: More evidence, an example of vertical smearing from my library: ...


8

They are two totally different designs. One is a non-extending lens that does all of the "zooming" internally. The other is an extending zoom lens that is considerably shorter at 70mm than at 200mm. In fact, the RF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS is slightly longer than the EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS III when the RF lens is zoomed all the way in to 200mm.


8

Electronic viewfinder Pros: Potentially smaller and lighter camera bodies and lenses (particularly wide angle lenses) Can zoom in to verify precise focus and depth of field Can see (almost) exactly what the camera sees, even in low light Can superimpose more complex data over the image (e.g. zebra stripes, focus peaking); see note below. No mirror assembly ...


5

The Fuji X-T3 and X-Pro2 (among others) have a focus assist feature called Focus Peak Highlight that shows what is in focus by outlining items in both the EVF and rear LCD that are in focus. This display changes with lens aperture (roughly) indicating near and far range of sharp focus. I believe other EVF camera systems have equivalent features.


5

All information below is general in nature and may or may not be specifically applicable the the Sony α7R II. Why does α7R II overheat? Any electronic device overheats because it generates heat faster than it can dissipate it in the environment in which it is operating and eventually the internal temperature reaches a point that the hardware no longer ...


5

The air is full of dust. It's floating around everywhere all the time. When you open the lens in a dusty environment (which is to say "every environment that isn't a clean room"), dust gets into the light-box of the camera. You didn't ask, but this is why seems silly to advise people to point their cameras down while changing lenses. Observe how dust moves ...


5

At best it could only be a very rough estimate. Why is this so? Because ultimately depth of field depends on factors that the camera does not know and which may be, and often are, changed after the image is captured. Among them: Display size. The more an image is enlarged from the size of the image projected by the lens onto the camera's sensor, the more ...


5

I agree with mattdm, dust in images are usually found on or near the sensor. They are usually visible at small apertures, like F16-32. Some thoughts and points to consider on this topic: You can avoid problem apertures with aperture priority. Dust usually isn't visible in photos taken with apertures larger than about F8. Check for dust proportional to how ...


4

In its current design, it was achieved by using an extending lens body. A recent interview in DPReview with Canon's executives states: Q: In terms of making the new 70-200mm smaller, how difficult was it to decide to move to an extending zoom design? A: We've not actually disclosed that it is going to extend or not, but we do have the extending ...


4

An optical viewfinder can never have any lag, since it's optical it operates at the speed of light. On the other hand with an optical viewfinder you will not see exactly what you will get in you image file. Exposure, white balance, color and image crop (3:2, 1:1, ...) settings are not visible in the optical viewfinder, but can be visible in the electronic ...


3

Nikon, Canon, and Sony all make adapters to mount their SLR lenses (F-mount, EF-mount, and A-mount, respectively) to their mirrorless systems (Z-mount, RF-mount, and E-mount, respectively). Note that in some cases, not all lenses, or full lens functionality (usually, autofocus) is preserved or supported. But generally speaking (with lots of little caveats ...


3

Here's a different opinion: forget about the technical capabilities, optimize for carry convenience. For someone just starting out, the most important thing is practice. Get a camera that you can always have with you so you get lots of practice with it. A quote I like by one of the photography masters: It is an illusion that photos are made with the ...


3

Is it to keep dust out of the unprotected sensor by offering dust many alternative places to stick to, in case someone carries the mount adapter in the camera bag without caps on both ends? Or is it to prevent light from reflecting from the walls of the adapter? Yes. Mostly the latter, but it would also help with the former.


3

This is known as "banding". This happens when you have uniform color gradients and the quantization by the camera (because JPEG is only 8bits/channel) transforms them into uniform areas. Along the edge of these areas the value "jumps" and our eyes are quite sensitive to this. This can be checked with the histogram, which assumes a hair comb shape (the ...


3

This looks like a video/cinema focus-puller's tool [albeit a budget one] Even the good ones will not snap focus like a stills camera's AF. They are meant to be 'smooth' not 'fast'. Even if you could access the camera's API [unlikely, as already mentioned by scottbb] then something this cheap will either refuse to keep up, burn itself out in half an hour, ...


2

So, I approached Nikon in the end to clarify the situation. Unfortunately this is not possible and they recommended me to use a wall adapter. The Norwegian mountains are a bit short on power outlets, but at least it has been clarified now...


2

Manual focusing needs to be handled differently with an EVF. Since most EVF are much lower in resolution than the sensor, it is hard to judge best focus by sight, requiring the use of focusing aids like peaking or focus magnification. On the other hand, when these aids are used (which might require additional operating steps), manual focus will often be ...


2

This really depends on what you are shooting and if you consider the shot to be "final" when you shoot it. JPEG is an excellent "final output" format -- when no further changes would be needed. But if any changes are desired, JPEG is lacking and this is why more serious photographers shoot RAW. Depending on camera model, the RAW files are capable of ...


2

Don't shoot JPG. Shoot either RAW or JPG+RAW. In practice, the extra time the camera needs to create the JPG is minimal because cameras have processors specifically optimized for this, and the JPG is so small (in megabytes) compared to RAW, so that the time to write it to the memory card isn't critical either. So, JPG+RAW it is for me. Today, I took a photo ...


2

The a6000 can save both formats at the same time (and Zoidberg too if that is wanted). So unless you want to save on card space or need fast writing speed for continous shooting modes, choose RAW+JPEG mode, with the JPEG style indeed set to "Fine". NOTE: The following is about amateurs, artists and enthusiasts, not result-oriented (documentary or commercial,...


2

The M100 looks like a good camera the picture quality should be excelent and I would not worry about low light performance, the lenses will have a greater inpact here. According to me the main dissadvantages of the M100 is the lack of a flash hotshoe and a viewfinder. No hotshoe means not being able to attach an external flash on top of the camera and ...


2

In practice, that is just what focus peaking (when set to the right sensitivity) does - mark up anything that is recognizable as acceptably sharp. A single lens camera, unless using something like an auxiliary Time-of-flight sensor, has no actual concept of distance of objects in the viewfinder, with the exception of objects that a phase detection autofocus ...


2

Yes, this is possible. First, select the servo AF mode. Then, select AF point to face detect + tracking. Now with the previous settings, you won't see the AF point anymore in the viewfinder or the LCD because it's doing face detect. Then, set custom functions II-7: initial servo AF point for face detect + tracking to the setting value 2 (AF point set for ...


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