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20

I can not imagine damage that would impact focusing without visible damage to the packaging or the camera. These things are pretty sturdy. you would have to damage the mirror or shutter box to really have an impact. So I suspect user error. These images appear to be in focus, but perhaps not where the photographer expected. I see areas in focus in both. ...


17

Use a telephoto lens, positioning you and camera several feet/meters away. Your reflection will be much smaller. Can also use a mirror, which will effectively do same thing: position mirror on one side, then you and camera on other to reduce your reflection. Again, a telephoto lens and distance are your friends. Based on the comments, I will explain the ...


10

I'm thinking in several options: Put a timer on the camera, and "duck and hide" Use a remote trigger, and just hide. Point the lights away from you and the camera. You most likely are using diffused light. If you are using a softbox you can use a grid so you don't spill the light on you or the camera. If you are using an umbrella you can position 1 or 2 ...


8

If you have a higher budget, or access to a room with one, and the shot wouldn't be spoiled by re-location, you could use a one-way mirror to hide yourself and your camera from view. Just make sure to turn the flash off, or you'll spoil the trick.


7

Based on an update in the comments it looks like you're trying to build some kind of stereoscopic mount or device to capture two images in one exposure. A prism offers better light transmission. Mirrors are significantly lighter. Mirrors offer some ability to modify their geometry. Mirrors are significantly cheaper to produce. Which is right for you ...


6

It may be the result of a battery going dead without prior warning. This happened to me using a third party battery pack. In order to fix this replace the battery pack with a charged one (preferably a Nikon battery). Turning the camera on will likely result in the "Err" message being displayed. Simply press down the shutter and the mirror should move into ...


6

Note: this was answered before the question was edited to remove the "mirror" in the title How to shoot a reflection in a highly reflective surface (mirror, ball bearing, et cet) without me appearing in it? In case of a flat mirror then there's another way using tilt-shift lens Another use of shifting is in taking pictures of a mirror. By moving ...


6

Just don't. The coating on the surface of your camera's mirror is the most fragile piece of your entire camera that is accessible without taking the camera apart, probably followed closely by the underside of the focusing screen located just above it. The mirror should never be touched on the surface. Unlike most mirrors in other applications that have the ...


6

Mirror moves so that you can track image in real time, framing object better and keeping eye on surroundings. Also, when mirror comes back to normal position, so does AF/AE system. In some DSLRs (maybe SLRs as well) quick shooting with mirror locked-up (and sometime additional restrictions like locked metering) gives higher frame-rate. Example is Canon's ...


6

Just about any wide angle (WA) or ultra wide angle (UWA) lens used with an interchangeable lens camera will use a retrofocus design. That does mean larger, heavier, and more complex than a non-retrofocus design. But that doesn't mean all retrofocus lenses must be equally large and heavy (and expensive). A wide angle lens that uses a retrofocus design is ...


5

Poking a hole into a large sheet works, but damages the sheet. Instead, use two white sheets that are held together by clamps. The space in between two clamps acts like a hole, without actually being a hole in one sheet. Unless the material you're using is unusually thick and opaque, wear light clothing when doing this. A dark object (i.e. a black T-shirt) ...


5

Today, most DSLR mirrors are operated by a dedicated motor. Return springs are used to move the mirror back into position. Some DSLR's have two mirror motors. One to raise and one for return. Here is a video that shows how the Canon EOS 7D Mark II operates: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLU5oygrkpw


5

The answer is that the pentaprism is actually a roof pentaprism. The image is laterally-inverted (left-right inverted) because the image actually bounces an additional time due to the roof of the pentaprism. Pentaprism diagram from Wikipedia: Single-lens reflex camera, CC-BY-3.0


5

With the adapter it seems your lens is too far from the camera to focus at infinity. The registration distance of the EF mount lens is 44mm. The registration distance of the Praktica B mount is also 44mm. The thickness of your adapter pushes the lens too far away from the camera's imaging sensor. The reason the viewfinder looks better is because the ...


4

How can I do this without the camera showing in the picture? Angles. Imagine a line running down the center of the mirror Stand to one side of the mirror and face the center line. Have someone else stand in the corresponding position on the other side of the line, also looking at the center of the mirror. You'll see the other person, and they'll see you but ...


4

Nikons from that era (D40, D50, D60, etc) have a couple of things that are fairly well known to cause the dreaded 'Shutter Error" and/or locked up mirror. The first is that the main drive wheel for the shutter/mirror cocking mechanism is dirty or needs lubrication. This wheel can be accessed on many Nikon cameras by removing the floor plate of the camera. ...


4

Because in most shooting modes you want the camera to perform Auto Focus and/or metering between each frame. If you are shooting action or sports and your subject is moving towards or away from you AF for each frame is essential. In conventionally designed DLSRs, the mirror must be down to auto focus and to meter. There are some higher end cameras that ...


4

The proper answer is "Send it to Nikon or an authorized repair facility". It will be expensive to fix, and may exceed the value of the camera (to you), but they will give you an estimate first and you can decide if it is worth fixing. You can try calling first and describing the issue and they may (or may not be willing to) give you a "no less than $x" cost ...


4

This doesn't seem useful: the operator doesn't look into the optical viewfinder during the process anyway You are mistaken... There are plenty of cases where you shoot bursts on mobile objects (sports, wildlife) and you need to be able to check that you are panning correctly and that they stay in the frame. On earlier bridge cameras, extracting the data ...


3

As much as I hate to use the old cliche, this is pretty much a case of, "If you have to ask how, you probably shouldn't be doing it." Mirror adjustments are delicate and must be done precisely. It doesn't take much misalignment at all of the mirror (and the attached secondary mirror) to render a camera's AF system completely useless. The optical path from ...


3

Since nobody's mentioned this, the time-honored method for creating a lightprobe image from a chromed ball bearing is to take two images of the ballbearing at right angles (90-degree), and then unwarp, rotate, and merge them, using portions of each image to erase the camera/tripod/photographer as well as replace the lower-quality pixels from the edge of the ...


3

Man, this is definitely a serious overkill. First of all, you need a good quality laser AND good quality mirrors. I mean laser-quality mirrors, to have predictable results. Second of all, you cannot simply "stitch" resulting images, as only standing waves will show a time invariant pattern, all others will be time varying (varying with phase from source, ...


3

The most possible reason is that the buyer tries to trick you (and he has all means for that). Maybe he wants to return the camera because of better option. Maybe he wants a refund. Maybe he wants to return a broken camera of same model (a bit paranoid but possible). The first image is fine. The camera might have picked the light reflected by the hood on ...


3

I bet the mirrors are made of cheap material and are not flat. Thus, the lines are distorted, and more so the more a particular image is reflected. The mix of straight and curved lines makes some kind of rolling shutter effect not a likely explanation. This is not an effect related to photography per se. It was that way to the naked eye, too. You may just ...


3

So turns out my guesses were completely wrong. I did end up opening the camera and putting some drops of oil in recommended places, which didn't end up solving the issue. However, during this process I removed the battery for the built in light meter. The original 1.3V battery is not really available anymore but I found out that a standard 1.4V hearing aid ...


2

Prisms have fewer air-to-glass transitions than a series of mirrors, and therefore better image quality. This is why SLRs and DSLRs with pentaprism viewfinders are usually preferred over pentamirror finders — although the latter are lighter and cheaper, both of which can also be significant advantages.


2

A tilt shift lens is nice but, well, photographing a mirror warrants also documenting how well it actually reflects things. You could consider either photographing it as part of a scene (namely accept the perspective distortion) or allow the camera to appear in the reflection as an example image. Of course, either implies using a narrow aperture since you ...


2

A few options: Use a softbox or diffuser panel of the shape you want to appear on the reflective surface. Make sure that ambient exposure falls to black and that the light source is at the distance that creates the reflection you want. You should see only the reflection of the light source. If you need shadowless, consider a huge softbox suspended just ...


2

Another possible solution is to spray the object with water mist or something similar to cut down on the reflections. Obviously this will lessen all reflections, not just unwanted ones, but this may look acceptible as well.


2

Mirrors usually flip back when not energized so that debris from mounting a new lens does not reach the sensor. They are also hold in place in some mechanical means, so when not energized, they do not shake and vibrate during transportation. Mirrors with only one latching position (e.g. spring pulls it to a closed position) will require power to keep the ...


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