Hot answers tagged

12

I'm not too sure about your mount questions, but I do collect working vintage gear. Here's what I do and look for... If applicable, bring a battery - There's really no excuse not to bring a fresh battery for the camera you're interested in. Bring a pen light - your cellphone light may also work. You just want to be able to really see inside the nooks and ...


7

No. The six SLR mounts that you can easily adapt to Canon EOS with simple ring adapters are Leica-R, Nikon F, Contax/Yashica, Pentax K, M42, and Olympus OM. But Minolta AF lenses work just fine on Sony Alpha (A-mount) dSLRs and dSLTs without any adapters. And you can, of course, adapt these to mount on the Sony E-mount (NEX). But not for Canon EOS. When ...


6

I am not familiar with this exact lens and camera model, but with similar questions related to Sony Alpha cameras and manual focus lenses. I assume your camera gives an error message similar to the following: "Check the lens attachment. If the lens is not supported, you can permit use of the lens in the custom menu." I suspect the reason for this is that ...


5

Depth of field calculation depends on multiple factors: captor size focal length aperture and last but not least: subject distance Using a Depth of field simulator (http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html) with your camera, you will get the following result: Distance to subject: 5 meters 50mm f/1.7 => Depth of Field of 0.67 m 70 mm f/4 => Depth of Field of 0....


5

This is definitely edge-fogged film. We can’t say if the film was light-struck due to improper camera loading /unloading or camera light-leak or if the film was mishandled at the processing lab. All are suspect. Film cameras should be loaded and unloaded in subdued light. You would be wise to test your camera to see if it is leaking light. Often the light ...


4

That means that fake lens data is transmitted to the camera. The camera therefore records that it took a photo with a 50mm F/1.4, probably always at F/1.4 regardless of which lens you actually have mounted on the adapter. Some adapters do not send any data and show Unknown Lens instead. Now since you are asking this, I am guessing you do not look much at ...


4

Consider Sony A-mount Your Tamron lens is Minolta AF mount. This is, in fact, the same lens mount that Sony's A-mount SLT cameras use, so if it's absolutely imperative that you use this lens, Sony's A-mount cameras would not require an adapter and would give the highest level of compatibility (including autofocus). However, to most of us, a third-party slow ...


4

It reminds me of one of my FD mount lenses where you pull\push to adjust focal length, rotate to adjust focus, and then there is the aperture ring for...well adjusting the aperture. I don't quite understand what you mean when you say 'swipe' through the aperture settings. It is a variable aperture so, when it is at 205mm it has an aperture of 4.8 as ...


4

There is a FotodioX adapter which has aperture control and maintains infinity focus through an optical element. FotodioX Pro Lens Mount Adapter for Sony A Lens to Canon EF Mount


4

The Minolta Hi Matic 9 has a fixed 45mm lens. It is not possible to switch lenses. Source: oldcamerareview Lens variety and interchangeability – Nope, you won’t get that either. But, if you are the person that had to save up and finally got your Leica and lens, you probably can’t afford another lens for awhile anyway.


4

The Sony A3000 utilizes the Sony E-mount. Looks like the Minolta lens uses the older Minolta / Sony alpha mount. It's slightly confusing because the body is called a "Sony Alpha" but the mount isn't an alpha. You can get the Sony LA-EA3 adapter which will allow you to utilize all the functions of the alpha lens on the A3000 except autofocus. It looks like ...


4

Just my 2 cents. That lens looks like is a manual lens. I have a Vivitar Series 1, that was a pretty good lens, Vivitar's top of the line back in the days. But now is really quite difficult to have a sharp focus manually. Especially if you want to use a wide aperture. The 28 mm focal length is most likely covered if you have the kit lens. For Portrait are ...


4

Check your camera's Owners Manual, User's Manual, or Instruction Manual to see if there are any directions for this situation. Often they will be found in the "troubleshooting" section. If you don't have a manual for your camera, you can usually find one online by googling your camera's model name followed by the word manual. If there are instructions in the ...


4

This is a Minolta MD lens mount. It's hard to see in your photo, but by increasing the brightness, you can see the shutter-preferred auto-exposure lug (called the MD lug) (blue arrow), and the meter coupling (MC) tab (red arrow). These lugs identify it as a MD mount lens. See also: Minolta SLR Lens Mounts Minolta SR-mount (Wikipedia)


4

Age and heat have detrimental effects on any lubrication or seals in a camera. Heat may have caused the the substance that hold the prism in place to soften allowing the substance or the prism to shift. The shutter and film winding mechanisms also need proper lubrication in order to function as designed. The best coarse of action on any old camera is to ...


3

Vivitar is a third-party lens maker that can make a lens in a variety of camera mounts, so there's no way anyone can answer your question without being able to see the specific lens you're talking about. I'd suggest looking through a visual guide to lens mounts to see if the Vivitar uses the mount for the Minolta AF or Sony A-mount systems (the mount the ...


3

Yes, there are. Any digital camera with an A-mount will accept them directly. The Sony A68 is the latest such model and uses an APS-C sensor so it will crop the field of view by 1.5X, meaning all your lenses will become less wide but they will still work. To preserve the field-of-view, you can use a full-frame model such as the Sony SLT-A99V. There is ...


3

Yes, lenses with a Minolta SR-mount (to which the MC mount is backwards compatible) can be used on digital bodies with an adapter. There is a large variety of adapters available to almost any digital body, see for example here and select "Minolta MD" in "Lens Fitting (Female)". Roughly speaking, there are two basic cases depending on the flange focal ...


3

That tiny part hanging out of the canister is known as the 'leader'. Notice that it is only about half as wide as the rest of the film (or canister). Don't pull on it to check this if you can't see the full width of the roll, just trust me. The rest of the roll is fine, the canister is working exactly as designed. Some cameras roll the entire film, ...


3

It sounds like everything is fine- some cameras don't rewind the film all the way back into cartridge, and yours must be one of them. When you get the film developed, you won't see any problem.


3

You can share your A-mount lenses with an autofocus A-mount Minolta 35mm film body, but not an MC/MD-mount manual focus one--that's a completely different mount, different registration distance, different bayonet/physical linkage. No electronic communication. While you could, theoretically adapt with a ring, you'd have issues with vignetting if your A-mount ...


3

Since the letters "MC" are stamped on the ID ring along with the other information I would think it is a Minolta MC/MD mount lens. Even if the "MC" stand for "multi-Coated" and was printed on the lens for all of the various mounts for which it was made, the "MC" led me to compare it to the Minolta mount. The bayonets match up with the Minolta pattern as ...


3

I'll try to give a concise answer to make things easy. First of all, you cannot buy any lens and expect it to be compatible with your camera. The easiest way to proceed is to stick with Canon EOS lenses, which are designed to be compatible with your camera. Avoid Minolta lenses if you want to keep things simple. Now... Do you have a lens for your camera ...


3

Can any give me a good explanation of how this is supposed to work, or if it can work at all with a 100mm lens? If you're set on using a 100mm lens, you will need to add some more distance between the camera and bellows, using extension tubes. For 1:1 slide copy work, that bellows was intended to be used with a 50mm lens (or similar focal length). ...


3

I've encountered adapters that allow lenses with M42, T2, TX, and Adaptall mounts to be used on Minolta cameras with SR/MC/MD mounts. You can adapt some other mounts, such as DKL, via M42. The reason for so few adapters isn't technical, but limited market potential. No new cameras with SR-based mounts are being produced. Also, it usually makes more sense to ...


3

No, it doesn't require batteries, although there are drawbacks to using the camera without them. The battery powers the camera's light meter. This means you will not be able to shoot in auto without a battery. You could shoot manually, but this would mean metering must be done either by guestimating, using the sunny 16 rule, or by the use of an external ...


3

Probably caused by a sticking shutter. Multiple possible causes... the only thing to do is have it serviced and hopefully it is something easy to fix (CLA as Hueco said). Last film camera I took in to have the shutter fixed was DOA w/ no repair parts available... and that was over a decade ago. Either way it will probably cost more than the camera is worth (...


3

Your camera has Konica Bayonet II mount, which is also called Konica AR or K/AR mount. Both those Minolta lenses use a Minolta MC mount and will not fit your camera.


2

Minolta MD/MC (like Canon FD/FL) are not usable on dSLR/dSLT bodies without an adapter with an optical element in it to act like a short teleconverter so you can achieve focus to infinity. And a cheap one will be likely to have cheap glass, and can reduce image quality. A simple ring adapter will limit the focus capability of the lens to less than infinity, ...


2

Based on the detailed specifications and the results they produce they appear to be identical: http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/Sony-AF-Reflex-500mm-F8_lens310.html http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/Minolta-AF-Reflex-500mm-F8_lens25.html The only way to be 100% sure would be to disassemble them side by side, but based on what information is available, them being the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible