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I found this page while checking my stats on Flickr. (I'm the photographer that shot this photo) I thought I'd respond with details of how I created this image since I see multiple theories here. First - this is not a stacked exposure. The entire image is a single exposure (30 secs). I used a Nikon D700 DSLR at ISO 3200 to capture this image (at ~20mm/f2.8)....


44

The vast majority of night sky photos have been boosted in post to achieve their brightness. This is more true for cameras with smaller sensors than for cameras with larger sensors, but in general, even if you shoot the night sky at ISO 3200, you are going to need to boost exposure to get one of those nice, bright single-frame Milky Way shots. There are a ...


32

Use the maximum aperture. Shutter Speed: Use the 600/(focal length * crop Factor) rule so as to not see the star trails in your picure (Refer here in section 3. Camera settings). For your 19mm lens you can go up to 20 seconds. Highest ISO possible for your camera that you find the images acceptable. You can use the application: Stellarium to find ...


18

Johann3s' answer is good, and covers all the basics. When it comes to the milky way, which is a form of ultra wide field night sky astrophotography, you want to use the highest ISO you can get away with, the longest exposure you can get away with, at the fastest aperture your lens supports. Here is a little bit more detail. The Technicalities Which ISO to ...


15

Let me answer the question by amalgamating suggestions made by several posters throughout the already provided answers and comments. Hopefully these suggestions taken together will help yield the best possible results. - Know where the Milky Way is Obviously, knowing which way to point the camera is important, but actually spotting the Milky Way with your ...


14

Everyone talks about shortest focal length and lower aperture when shooting Milky Way, and this guy does it with f5 How is that possible? It is possible to shoot at f/5 because he is also shooting at ISO12800. A single image at that ISO would be extremely noisy, but stacking 100 images at that ISO allows the random noise from each image to be averaged out. ...


13

In order to photograph the milkyway you want to capture as much light as possible within a certain timeframe. This means: Highest ISO you think is acceptable with your body Widest aperture Shutter speed as long as possible, without setting it too long so you can see the movement So looking at your settings, indeed the aperture could have been wider, like ...


12

Yes, you have way too much light pollution. It looks like the sky is Bortle class 7 or worse Class 7: Suburban/urban transition. The entire sky background has a vague, grayish white hue. Strong light sources are evident in all directions. The Milky Way is totally invisible or nearly so. M44 or M31 may be glimpsed with the unaided eye but are very ...


12

Time of year plays a big part in capturing a nice view into Milky way. So does the location on Earth where you are with your camera. It appears the sample photo (in the question) above is of a not-so-exciting part of Milky-way. The widest and most colorful part of Milky-way is where the direction is towards the center of our galaxy. Because earth's axis is ...


12

In fact, if you spend the night in a remote enough place with clear, moon-free sky you will see most of the colors. The sad truth is that most of us live in cities where light polution and smog do not let us see anything except the brightest stars.


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Unfortunately, a lot of images like the one you show here are digitally altered and it is difficult to get comparable results. The image above shows the Milky Way, looking approximately at its center, which appears to us to be in the constellation of Sagittarius. To get such a detailed view of the comparatively dark nebulous structures, however, you need ...


9

It is probably easier to talk about what qualities in a lens that often add significant cost that you don't need in order to do astrophotography. The first is Auto Focus. Stars are such tiny points of light that the accuracy of most AF systems is not quite good enough to resolve them to the absolute sharpest capability of the lens. Most AF systems can't ...


9

You can't see the colours in the milky way (or other stars for that matter) as the light coming from the milky way is too dim to be picked up by the cone cells in our eyes which distinguish colour. Instead the light only trips the more sensitive rod cells (which are usually used for detecting motion) hence we see the brightness but not the colour of the ...


9

Camera is better at seeing than our eyes. According to http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/cameras-vs-human-eye.htm astrophotographers have estimated that human eyes have a ISO rating of 500-1000 after being properly acclimated to dark conditions. The example photograph has used something like ISO 3200. Cameras can also take longer exposure (=gather ...


8

While all of the answers here offer something helpful, there's one thing that can't be stressed enough: you need to shoot from somewhere free of light pollution. Even if you don't have any major cities around for miles and miles and miles, it's likely that there's still some light pollution cast. You don't realize just how dark outside can be, and how easy ...


8

Your image has a severe case of light pollution, there isn't much contrast and the horizon is drowned. The bottom of the picture is much lighter than the top and this seriously reduces your editing possibilities. IMHO the "band" of stars isn't very visible in your shot. Using Gimp, I: made a more even exposure vertically across the image(*) used the "...


7

Finnish night sky is now dark enough to photograph stars (it is September now) so I went to try my first shots at stars. I have never tried to take a photo of stars before. My photos turned out even darker than yours, but I was more daring with my post-processing and I think I now know what is wrong with your photo. Post-processing! Naturally that is not ...


7

First of all you have to locate the milky way. For this you may use Stellarium; it calculates/simulates time & coordinates of the milky way. When you decide the time & location & direction, you need to find a good place where the light pollution is not problem. You'll take long exposures so atmosphere should be as dark as possible. Otherwise you'...


7

There are several things you can try. A full frame sensor will allow you to saturate the colors more in post processing before noise becomes an issue. If it has larger pixels (which most do) it will also allow higher exposure before color is lost to full saturation in all three channels (more on that below). Stacking multiple images will also allow you to ...


7

According to author's annotation to the image at 500px, it was taken in desert of Medina, Kuwait. It was submitted for inclusion with Ubuntu by someone else, and luckily the Albanian photographer Shady S. was happy to give his permission. More generally, you'll need a location with no light pollution from surroundings. Technique-wise, have a look at already ...


6

The second question is clear, stars need some time to (apparently) move in the sky. The celestial sphere is rotating at 15 degrees/hour around poles (Polaris on North hemisphere) and the apparent movement is bigger near the celestial equator and smaller near celestial poles. But this movement is really a big problem if you want to take sharp photos of ...


6

I usually edit (to avoid improve) my sky shoots in darktable with haze removal (dehaze in LR) increase local contrast increase sharpness If the image is greenish as your 2nd one you could change the whitebalance.


5

Is there a way to take a same set of images for a panaroma twice Yes. Simply do it a second time. You can be more consistent by using reference markings. For the tripod, that could be the join of tiles on the floor for example, a natural landmark like big stone that your tripod legs are touching, etc. You could also try marking the position the legs of ...


4

If you can see as little as the glow of lights of a small town over the horizon, you're going to suffer from light pollution to some extent. Light pollution is the reflection of the "glow" of cities off the atmosphere, brightening it, so dimmer stars can't be differentiated. If you see the clouds in your first picture, they're so bright because of the ...


4

They are indeed the same, as the other answers state. Either one is an excellent choice for night photography and landscapes in general. For example, the Israeli photographer Erez Marom travels the globe shooting night/landscape photos and the Samyang 14mm f/2.8 seems to be his "go to" lens for all things wide angle. He sells his work and some of the ...


4

I captured this image using a Samyang 14mm lens on a Canon 5D II. The Samyang is a manual focus lens so just make sure you set the proper focus especially when you are working in the dark. I had only a short period during one night to capture this and I'm sure you will be able to capture wonderful images if you have 6 months using the same combo. Also ...


4

OK - first, the H-alpha issue: DSLRs incorporate an Infra-red blocking filter, so that the colours come out correctly for normal shots, without being affected by infrared wavelengths. Unfortunately, the normal filters used for this in DSLRs also block about 80% or so of the deep red hydrogen alpha light. Most of the astrophoto images you see with a lot of ...


3

If your goal is to minimize star trails then the wider aperture is always preferred. The wider angle lens will allow you to get more of the milky way in a single shot, but if you are comfortable and willing to stitch multiple images together then it doesn't matter much. See: How do I capture the milky way?


3

Esa Hi. I too, after taking a not-dissimilar picture to your first effort, had similar thoughts and determined to see if I could improve. I'm still on that "journey", loving every minute of it, and I think improving. Funnily enough I am half Finnish, I have family in Lahti, Helsinki, Turku and Kuusamo, and have a brother called Esa. Some good stuff in the ...


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