6

So if my film ISO is 100, before metering and taking pictures with my camera, shouldn't I dial in 50 ISO on my light meter to compensate for that +1? Yes. You've got it. If your shutter speeds are edging into the seconds, do keep in mind reciprocity failure and the additional time needed to compensate for that as well. But, for general shooting at handheld ...


2

I could finally verify that the problem was 100% caused by the lens. It was internally unstable and in certain position the internal connections were not communicating the right values to the camera body (or they were completely isolated). This problem seems at first random happening, then after more shootings it got worse and in the end the lens got stuck ...


2

It looks like you've probably got 'Safety Shift' enabled and set to option 1: 'Shutter speed/Aperture' in your 70D's menu. It's found under the "Custom Functions" menu at 'Menu → Custom Functions (Orange Tab) → C.Fn I: Exposure → C.Fn I -6 Safety Shift'. It also looks like you're using a manual flash triggering method that the camera does not detect. Thus ...


2

To add to Michael's answer; Rec-709 and S-log2 are both gamma curves applied to the raw video data when a video is recorded. This is much the same as how a digital camera applies the 2.2 gamma curve when recording a jpeg, and Lightroom applying a 2.2 curve when displaying a raw file. Without a gamma curve applied, a raw image/file would not look the way a ...


2

It's the difference between the linear response of the digital sensor and the logarithmic response of human vision, which is taken into account by display devices such as monitors. An 18% grey card "properly" exposed is only RGB (127,127,127) after full gamma correction has been applied to the raw data. When using "log" recording, gamma ...


2

While there are many differences when shooting in Live-View compared to the Viewfinder, the one that seems the most applicable to these observations is that a dedicated metering sensor is used while shooting using the OVF. The warning that constantly appears is consistent with the long shutter-speed chosen and, given that Manual exposures work, it is highly ...


2

Film have a different ISO for different light sources. Set your meter at the rated ISO for for the film you are using. Expose 1 fame as indicated by the meter. Now using manual aperture control, shoot what is called an "exposure series or bracketing". I suggest making a test in 1 f-stop increments. 4 then 3 then 2 f-stops under followed by 1 then ...


1

The L508 is capable of metering both reflective light using its spot meter, as well as incident light, which is done using the white dome. Although reflective metering is more common (think of light meters built in cameras), they suffer from not being colourblind. A reflective light meter assumes to be 'looking' at a middle grey scene. If that scene is ...


1

Relevant information is available both at the Kiev Survival Site and in Isaak S. Maizenberg's book All You Need to Know About Design and Repair of Russian Cameras (1996). The screw you mention is used to calibrate the galvanometer scale. Of this, Maizenberg writes: To shift the galvanometer's scale, insert a screwdriver in the screw slot [...] and ...


1

Your light meter, or its connection to the camera's "brain", is broken. When in Live View the camera uses the main imaging sensor to do metering. When using the viewfinder, the mirror prevents the main sensor from receiving the light projected by the lens. So there is a dedicated light meter, usually placed in the prism/viewfinder area, that measures the ...


1

As Itai suggests, it's probably the light metering sensor in the viewfinder. So, you are able to see a reading at high ISO, wide aperture and negative compensation, do the numbers/meter blink then? Many/all Nikons do that when it's getting too dark to meter. Does the meter react to bright daylight at all, when you set it like that? I think it might not, ...


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