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Is spot metering just an EV compensation? Metering, regardless of type, and exposure compensation are different functions with different purposes. Metering is used to obtain exposure exposure settings (ISO, aperture, shutter speed), while exposure compensation is used to modify those values. It is basically the difference between nouns and adjectives. ...


4

Yes, you could match the spot metering result by some degree of EV compensation, if you knew how much compensation. We typically may not know, so we instead meter it to be able to manage that. Spot metering only analyzes the light intensity in that small spot. Regular metering looks at a much larger spot, closer to the full scene. Suppose you are ...


4

It sounds like the scene your were framing was outside the operating range of your 80D's meter. It's rated for EV 1-20. At ISO 100, EV 1 is equal to f/1 for 1/2 second.¹ The maximum ISO for the 80D is 25,600. That's 8 stops higher than ISO 100. f/8 is six stops darker than f/1. You report that 30 seconds was a good exposure time for ISO 25,600 and f/8....


4

You basically have the right idea in your first bullet. The simple approach is to meter and set your exposure for the foreground. Then meter the sky (not the sun), and pick a ND grad filter strength that is the difference of the two meter readings (or slightly less, to within a stop if you can). Depending on your scene, you might need to adjust your ...


3

This comes down to understanding how logarithms work. Specifically in photography, the log base-2 of a doubling ratio equates to a difference of 1 stop. We use logarithms to reduce repeated multiplication and division by growth factors to simpler linear addition or subtraction of stop values. If you are familiar with the decibel scale, this is the same ...


3

Why are not taken the real Area increments of 1.5, 1.33, 1.66 using the radius √(3/2), √(4/3), √(5/3) as the real fractional stops of +1/2EV; +1/3EV; +2/3EV? Because of addition property. Surely, you would like adding +1/2EV twice to produce +1EV which means 2*light. Now, if +1/2EV was 1.5*light, then +1EV would be 2.25*light.


3

The camera can be set to lock the exposure in auto modes using different buttons, but a system default is to lock in the exposure at the time you hold the shutter release half way down. So, you'd get to where you want to take a shot, go halfway down, the autofocus and exposure would lock in, and then you'd take the shot. Since you were using partial ...


2

How does a camera determine aperture when in shutter-priority mode? It measures the amount of light reflected from various areas of the scene and calculates a desired exposure value based upon the metering mode used. It then selects an aperture value that, combined with the shutter duration and ISO setting you have selected, will result in the desired ...


2

While there are many differences when shooting in Live-View compared to the Viewfinder, the one that seems the most applicable to these observations is that a dedicated metering sensor is used while shooting using the OVF. The warning that constantly appears is consistent with the long shutter-speed chosen and, given that Manual exposures work, it is highly ...


2

I could finally verify that the problem was 100% caused by the lens. It was internally unstable and in certain position the internal connections were not communicating the right values to the camera body (or they were completely isolated). This problem seems at first random happening, then after more shootings it got worse and in the end the lens got stuck ...


2

It looks like you've probably got 'Safety Shift' enabled and set to option 1: 'Shutter speed/Aperture' in your 70D's menu. It's found under the "Custom Functions" menu at 'Menu → Custom Functions (Orange Tab) → C.Fn I: Exposure → C.Fn I -6 Safety Shift'. It also looks like you're using a manual flash triggering method that the camera does not detect. Thus ...


1

Your light meter, or its connection to the camera's "brain", is broken. When in Live View the camera uses the main imaging sensor to do metering. When using the viewfinder, the mirror prevents the main sensor from receiving the light projected by the lens. So there is a dedicated light meter, usually placed in the prism/viewfinder area, that measures the ...


1

As Itai suggests, it's probably the light metering sensor in the viewfinder. So, you are able to see a reading at high ISO, wide aperture and negative compensation, do the numbers/meter blink then? Many/all Nikons do that when it's getting too dark to meter. Does the meter react to bright daylight at all, when you set it like that? I think it might not, ...


1

Relevant information is available both at the Kiev Survival Site and in Isaak S. Maizenberg's book All You Need to Know About Design and Repair of Russian Cameras (1996). The screw you mention is used to calibrate the galvanometer scale. Of this, Maizenberg writes: To shift the galvanometer's scale, insert a screwdriver in the screw slot [...] and ...


1

Is spot metering just an EV compensation? No. Spot metering only measures a small area of the total image. It bases exposure calculations only on the small area which it measures and totally ignores the rest of the frame. If I spot meter...can I achieve identical results with EV compensation? It doesn't matter how one gets there. The same ISO, aperture ...


1

It doesn't matter how you arrive at the three exposure relevant parameters time,aperture, and ISO. Whether you set them manually or via any of the automatic modes doesn't change the final result. EV compensation just tells the exposure automatic that you want it to set the values for a darker or lighter result than it thinks to be correct; Spot metering ...


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The kind of external light meter modern enthusiast and pro photographers know is indeed predominantly of a type optimized for incident light. These usually look like they have a ping pong ball embedded in them. The common type of external light meter in the 1970s and earlier, was optimized for reflected light metering by pointing it at the scene. ...


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