28

Question about thing like frame rate, resolution or dynamic range of the human eye and how they compare to cameras always have the same problems: The "picture" you see isn't a "single exposure", the eye is constantly moving and adjusting. The part of tee brain that handles vision is really good (and pretty big), it constantly combines the "frames" is gets ...


26

The 12MP designation is usually used to refer to still photography while the 1080p designation refers to video. The sensor has 12 megapixels - sometimes a little more which gets masked out. This means it takes 12 megapixel photos. Most likely this is a 4:3 aspect-ratio image which means about 4000x3000px. Video is a stream of images, most commonly ...


25

You're right. Picture quality is as complex as, say, how well a food item tastes. Megapixels only tell you the number of pixels the picture is made up of, and more is certainly not always better. More pixels on a small sensor means more noise. Megapixels are often used by marketing just because people want simple truths, like 18 MP must be better than 10. ...


19

About a million. I think that in general due to rounding — and more importantly, other real world factors which mean that megapixels only relate loosely to actual resolving power — it doesn't really matter if "megapixels" is binary or decimal. It is a useful term because it happens to be in the range where we get human-useful small numbers with the digital ...


18

Raw files don't really store any colors per pixel. They only store a single brightness value per pixel. It is true that with a Bayer mask over each pixel the light is filtered with either a Red, Green, or Blue filter¹ over each pixel well. But there's no hard cutoff where only green light gets through to a green filtered pixel or only red light gets through ...


18

1080p refers to video: 1920×1080 progressive scan. The phone is capable of 12 Mpixel still images but only 1080p video. (This is fairly typical; it takes a lot more processing power to take video at a given resolution than to take a still at that resolution.)


17

If the resolution long axis is at least 1920 and the short edge at least 1080 then yes, you can take HD images without having to upscale. However, due to benefits of oversampling, you will make a better HD image by grabbing a 16MP image and then resize with the best available resize method, e.g. lanczos interpolation if available. Another problem you may ...


15

GEEKY ANSWER - you have been warned. There's much more to the image quality than just lens and megapixels. The most important factor in any photograph is: Light You can have the best camera and lens in the universe - and that will still be meaningless if you have no light, or very badly lit subject. After that comes... lens. Lens is what bends the light,...


13

If you look at the specifications of the human eye as if it's a camera, you're going to find it's pretty low-specced. Very low resolution in terms of pixels - very few megapixels - with most pixels concentrated in a very small area in the centre. Virtually no ability to distinguish fine detail outside of a small area in the centre of the frame. Horrible ...


13

No, because of the Bayer filter. You would actually need around 11 megapixels. What a Bayer filter is Colour camera sensors use Bayer filters to capture the various colours. The Bayer filter effectively halves the resolution of the sensor for each colour (though green is left with slightly more in a checker-board pattern). Each pixel on the sensor can ...


13

Higher megapixels do not add to lens sharpness. This has been found by many Canon EOS 90D owners. It has 32.5 megapixel APS-C sensor. Its pixel density is the same as 83.2 megapixel full frame camera. For example, Canon has announced a list of recommended lenses for EOS 5DS that is a 50.6 megapixel full frame camera. Interestingly enough, Canon has not ...


12

You are right that a 1080p HD image has just under 2 megapixels. Now where you have to be careful is in considering the aspect ratio of your camera. If it shoots natively 16:9 images and it has 2 MP, then you would have enough resolution. If the camera has a 4:3 sensor which is the most common for small cameras, a 2 MP camera would most likely capture a ...


11

If you shoot under 400iso and don't print large, you won't notice much difference in the image quality. If you shoot higher ISOs, the Mk II has less noise. Practically speaking, the screen on the MK I is the most annoying thing if you're used to the MK II. Colour accuracy and sharpness during playback are poor compared to the MKII and newer cameras- and far ...


11

Not necessarily. Each lens can only produce a certain amount of detail, which means at some point it doesn't make sense anymore to increase pixel count because the given lens is not good enough for it. Higher megapixel sensors are also more vulnerable to camera shake and usually perform worse in low lighting conditions (as the individual pixels are smaller ...


10

A megapixel is defined as 1 million pixels, not 2^20.


9

Let me start by saying that the term "true resolution" has no set meaning. It is a term that Snapsort uses to try and simplify the meaningful detail a camera can capture. Resolution, at its most basic, is the level of granularity of detail that a camera can capture. You could have a 200 mega pixel camera, but if the image was out of focus and you only ...


9

There is no hard limit to resolution - details don't just vanish they fade out gradually as the contrast between light and dark is reduced. This reduction in contrast is expressed by means of the modulation transfer function (MTF). It's just a fancy way of saying details of size X will experience a loss of contrast Y. The MTF of a camera system is the ...


9

It depends on the lens and the aperture at which it is used. Even a theoretically perfect (diffraction limited) lens can only generate an average of ~16MP at f/11 on a full frame sensor, and it goes down by ~50% for each 1.5x crop factor (7MP for APS, 4MP for 4/3, green wavelength). This chart shows the maximum resolution theoretically possible at each ...


8

Lens resolution is much more complex than sensor resolution. It's not constant across the lens, and changes with aperture. Here's a forum discussion that goes into the details of lens/sensor comparisons, and the important part is: even a perfect lens would have a lower resolution than your sensor at f/11 aperture due to diffraction! Extremely low ...


8

A quick search indicates that that "12MP + 12MP" means exactly that: two 12MP cameras. One is a "standard" camera, for the other several possibilities exist (depending on maker): monochrome, wide angle, or tele lens. The 8MP is a 3rd camera facing the other way (for "selfies" while watching the screen). I would expect the phone info tells you what that ...


7

Technically, 1000 pixels would be 0,001 megapixels. But that's probably not what was intended. 1000 pixels probably refers to the image width and height, whereas megapixels usually refer to area, which is the product of width and height. You might need to clarify what exactly was meant, but I guess you should resize the images so that neither width nor ...


6

[NOTE: The duplicate linked by Mattdm offers the formula, however I'm not sure that actually answers the question you have asked, so here is some additional thought process and explanation that will hopefully answer the question.] When it comes down to print size, "How many megapixels?" is not really the right question, at least not initially. Print size is ...


6

To start with, the sensor doesn't output any color. Each pixel only records a single value: how much light struck the sensor. The number of bits determines how fine the steps between each brightness level can be. That's why a 12-bit or 14-bit file can record much finer gradations of lightness than an 8-bit file. But raw files are also compressed, just ...


6

Given a large enough print size, the difference in image quality will make itself apparent. The question then becomes, what is that print size? The graphic in this answer leads us to believe that the difference is a print size of ~11x17 and ~13x20. And honestly, that's not taking interpolation into it. It is possible to increase an images size up to a ...


5

How many "pixels" the human eye captures does not really answer the question. It only equates when, say, the picture you've taken with a camera is blown up to be big enough to consume the viewer's entire visual field. At that size, the original photo would have needed to be approximately 576 Mp. Detail for a picture is usually measured in DPI (dots per ...


5

The main benefits of the 5D MkII over the 5D MkI include: Addition of ISO 3200 and 6400 native ISOs 21MP over 13MP Addition of dust reduction features New menus and interface Vignetting correction built in AF Micro Adjustment 98% viewfinder instead of 96% Higher resolution larger LCD screen Live view for composition Twice the battery capacity/frames per ...


5

The raw image file captured by the camera (before it's converted to a jpeg) will be the same regardless of what megapixel setting you use. So changing the megapixel size does not in any way alter the amount of signal (captured light) vs. noise that the camera's processor has to work with when creating the resulting jpeg. That said, downsampling an image ...


5

It has no impact on it what so ever. More resolution is almost always a good thing. The reason the megapixel race died down is because the amount of gain we got for cramming in more megapixels was superseded by other advances. Short of physical optics constraints (diffraction limiting), DSLRs are now at a point of resolution that used to be reserved for ...


5

"True resolution" is a term that this particular site (snapsort.com) has made up in an attempt to account for the fact that pixel size and density play a factor as well. You can check out their whole page about it here. There is no industry standard term called 'true resolution'. They're calculating it based on the size of the Airy disk, given a maximum ...


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