52

How to zoom with Canon 77D with Canon 50mm 1.4 lens To zoom in, step forward. To zoom out, step back. It's often called zooming with your feet.


41

You can’t. The 50mm f/1.4 is a prime lens, which means it has a fixed focal length, or fixed field of view. This is what some people call a “sneaker zoom” lens, where you as the photographer have to physically move to change what you see in the viewfinder. See mattdm’s great response in this question.


11

The equation assumes a simple single element lens that is bilaterally symmetrical. The camera lens, to mitigate the 7 major aberrations (shortcomings that degrade) is constructed using several individual glass lens elements. Some are positive in power, some with negative power. Some are air-spaced apart and some are cemented together. Because this array ...


11

I assume this is a still frame from a video, because 16:9 is a common video ratio. In order to maintain constant frame size, "digital zooming" needs to be reinterpolated. Thus, yes, you need to account for the "zoom ratio" by factoring in 1.4 times the focal length. However, your calculations are off, because a "1/3.1-inch" sensor is not actually 1/3.1" in ...


8

Focal Length controls the field of view in front of the lens. A longer focal length has a narrower field of view than a shorter one. Behind the lens, it is designed to project this image to a certain size and distance, as given by camera mount specifications. So we perceive this narrower field of view as having more "reach" as you can see farther into the ...


8

Sorry, no; the magnification designation of a macro lens is the ratio of the physical size of the object to the size it appears on the sensor, meaning at 1:2 magnification, the image of the object would be half life size on the sensor (so e.g. a 2cm diameter coin would have an image 1cm wide on the sensor). Of course being a smaller sensor, the image would ...


7

first of all, kudos on your effort to break a photography problem down to first principles. The discrepancy you've observed stems from a common oversimplification. Your 100mm Lens is actually what optical engineers refer to as a "lens assembly" As you likely know, it is comprised of multiple lens elements in groups working in tandem to form, refine, and ...


6

Putting aside some of the details of this and strictly speaking, shooting something that is 0.15 m tall and 500 meters away on a full-frame camera will require a nearly 100,000mm long lens (which doesn't exist, or at least isn't generally available). Two lines of text tall might be 0.3 m and needs a 53,000mm focal length (which doesn't exist). Ten lines of ...


6

From Nasim Mansurov, the author and founder of Photography Life. Teleconverters do not affect optical characteristics of lenses – they only magnify the center portion of the frame. This means that if one were to use a telephoto lens with a short minimum focus distance, it could be used as an excellent option for extreme close-up / macro photography as ...


6

I think the answer you seek is in terms of "angular magnification" as it is used with binoculars. In the world of binoculars there is a number that is referred to as "magnification". For example a 10×45 set would offer 10× magnification (and a 45mmØ ocular). This means that the subject appears 10 times closer than with the unaided eye. This isn'...


5

The maximum magnification is an expression of the size as it is projected onto the recording medium. That is, it is a reference to the size of the projection on the surface of the sensor or film. If you have an item that is 20mm long and you're using an APS-C camera with a macro lens capable of 1:1 reproduction, the item will be projected onto the 24x16mm ...


5

This is not "obviously irrelevant to normal photography" at all; we just don't normally worry about the sort of precision that you'll need to deal with. There are two numbers that we ordinarily take at face value, knowing that they're slight fibs: the focal length of the lens (which is usualy rounded to a "friendly" value except on data sheets), and the ...


5

Leica 10X binoculars show a field-of-view of 6.7°. This is slightly wider than a 400mm lens on a full-frame camera. The Panasonic FZ1000 has an equivalent 25-400mm zoom, so at its maximum it will appear slightly more zoomed-in than the binoculars, showing a 6.1° angle-of-view. The angle-of-view is the best way to compare these two because other measures ...


5

You'll need to know the physical size of the camera's sensor. An object of length 37.5 µm appearing on the physical sensor as an image of length x µm implies a magnification of (x / 37.5). In order to determine the length of the image on the sensor, look at the number of pixels it takes up, and compare that to the total pixel count along that edge of the ...


5

The answer to your question generally is yes. However as you mention, the ratio of how much of the overall image your subject takes up will depend on your sensor size. What you do have to watch out for is that the "35mm equivalent focal length" should not be used but the actual focal length as quoted on the camera specs - this is usually something in the ...


4

Yes, they are independent of sensor size. Even if the subjects appear to be bigger or nearer on a smaller sensor because of the larger pixel density, the subject's size on the sensor is the same regardless of sensor size. To elaborate: If a subject occupies 3mm of a sensor, it will occupy 3mm even if you change the sensor size, given that you keep the ...


4

When a macro lens has a reproduction ratio of 1:1 an object with a given size will be reproduced at the image plane at the same size. This is irrespective of the focal length. The only difference is that a longer focal length will afford you the ability to achieve that reproduction ratio at a greater distance than the shorter focal length. The precise ...


4

The magnification will be 1:1, unchanged with that lens at 1:1 on any body. The only difference is that the cropped body will crop the image. Say you photograph some 15 mm object at 1:1 with both bodies. At 1:1, the object will be 15mm on any sensor. The lens does what it does. And that is the meaning of 1:1. But the full frame will be 36x24mm with a ...


4

Zoom is zoom and magnification is magnification. Apples and oranges. Optical Magnification is the ratio between the apparent size of an object (or its size in an image) and its true size. It is calculated with the following formula: M = (di - f) / f with di as found in the following image: Zoom is the ratio of focal length as you mention it in your ...


4

Depth of field is only effected by aperture and magnification. (magnification is the result of focal length and distance) Changing the focal length while keeping the same aperture and magnification will NOT change the depth of field. (in order to keep the same magnification, if you change the focal length, the distance must also change)


4

No, more megapixels does not magnify the image (meaning the subject image). Focal length (zoom) magnifies the subject size in the image. Magnify is a word referencing the subject size within the image frame. Magnification is increased by longer focal length and/or by closer subject distance. More megapixels is a larger digital image (if measured in pixels),...


4

The standard meaning of optical magnification/magnification ratio has to do with the physical size of the object and the physical area of the image plane (film/sensor) that it occupies when recorded. E.g. if 1cm on a ruler is recorded occupying 1cm on the sensor then it is at a 1:1 magnification ratio. I.e only 3.5cm can be recorded on a FF (35mm wide) ...


4

The percentage is the scaling applied to render the image onto the display. The size of the image on screen will therefore depend on your screen size. Conceptually this can be thought of: 100% means that each pixel of the image is shown as 100% of a pixel on screen. 200% is zoom in because each pixel of the image takes 200% of a screen pixel which is 2 ...


3

Photograph a normal ruler, mm scale preferred. Then if your sensor is 24 mm wide (camera specs should say), and if the image shows say 20mm of that ruler, then the magnification is 24/20 or 1.2x (larger than 1:1 life size). Normally lenses show smaller than life size, like showing 40 mm on a 24mm sensor would be 24/40 = 0.6x magnification.


3

Effective aperture is the size, in terms of diameter, of the diaphragm opening as viewed through the front element of the lens. It is the apparent diameter that is used to calculate the f-number for a given aperture setting. For instance, if you have a 200mm lens and want an aperture of f/4, the effective aperture needs to appear to be 50mm wide, regardless ...


3

Cambridge in colour has an online magnification ratio calculator. And to quote the web site: An extension tube increases lens magnification by an amount equal to the extension distance divided by the lens focal length. Which, translates into: M_ExtendedLens = M_Lens + ExtensionLength / FocalLength Comment on jrista's answer I'm shy of having enough ...


3

Yes, a bellows set should be able to give you 1:1, unless it's too deep when collapsed. In that case, it's not that you can't get up to 1:1, but that you won't be able to get down to 1:1 with the lens nominally adjusted to infinity focus; your magnification will always be greater than 1:1. In both cases (the dedicated Adaptall extension tube and the bellows) ...


3

A larger viewfinder might help slightly, but probably not as much as you hope. You probably won't notice any difference in focusing ability between a pentamirror and pentaprism. The best way to increase your manual focusing ability is to replace your camera's focusing screen with one that has split prism and microprism focusing aids, just like the ones you ...


3

Absolutely, yes. But possibly not in the way you're thinking. The obvious disadvantage is the challenge of getting sharply focuses images while focusing manually. I have great vision, but I still struggle to focus sharply. You can change the type of focus screen with some dSLR models and that can add some focus aids like split-circles and prism collars; ...


3

Using this Extension Calculator it looks like it may be difficult to find a bellows with the amount of extension you need. To achieve 5:1 magnification with a 100mm lens, you need to have a lens extension of approx 400mm or 15 inches. You will also need a bellows that has electrical contacts so that you can control the aperture on your Tamron lens. ...


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