12

A simple lens (like the lens in a pair of glasses) forms an image at a distance of f behind the lens for an object at infinity (where f is the focal length). The same lens will form an image at 2f behind the lens for an object 2f in front of the lens. This will achieve 1:1 magnification, i.e. the definition of macro. Thus any single element lens is a macro ...


12

Let's start with what is similar with all three of these lenses: They all have a focal length of 50mm. You should also be able to have a lot of overlapping focusing distances and aperture values. Now, to what's different. When it comes to a zoom lens, they tend * to have a different maximum aperture values that are smaller than with a prime. The advantage ...


10

If you own a Canon camera, then to really do macro photography like that you probably want the MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1-5x Zoom Macro lens. Unlike most macro lenses which max out at a 1:1 reproduction ratio, which is usually not quite enough to get close-up shots of bug parts, the MP-E 65mm macro is a zoom macro. It supports a magnification ratio between as low as ...


10

Because most interchangeable lens cameras typically use larger-format sensors than 1/2.3"-format. The close-focusing capability of most small-sensored compacts comes from the fact that small sensors use proportionately short lenses. Very short lenses (those under 10mm focal lengths) tend to have very deep depth of field--deep enough to have close focus ...


9

The minimum focus distance is a property of the lens and the distance to the sensor. The lens-to-sensor distance is the same for all Canon DSLRs hence the minimum focus distance doesn't change when using a cropped sensor body. There are adapters you can get to magnify the viewfinder image, here's a review of an offical Canon product, numerous third party ...


9

The Sigma 70-300 mm F4-5.6 DG APO Macro is a lens that is available for both Sigma cameras and as a third party lens for many other brands, among them Nikon. These different manufacturers uses different lens mounts and this particular lens is available for Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Pentax KAF, Sigma SA Bayonet and Sony/Minolta Alpha mounts. These mounts are ...


8

It depends on how you define fixed and variable. As you change the focus distance of many prime lenses, including some macro lenses, the actual focal length changes a little bit. Most fixed focal length lens' focal lengths are defined when the lens is focused on infinity and the light focused at the film/sensor plane is collimated when entering the lens. ...


8

This isn't a problem at all. The behaviour of the camera is normal. When the aperture is adjusted on the camera (eiter automatically or manually) the aperture of the lens wont change untill the moment when you take the shot. The reason to design the camera in this way is to maximize the available light (and microcontrast between out-of-focus and in focus ...


8

The focal length of a lens is a calculation made when the lens is imaging an object at infinity. This is a distance as far “as the eye can see” symbol ∞. As we focus on objects nearer than infinity, we must lengthen the distance, lens to sensor (film). The now elongated distance is called “back focus”. The lens to sensor/film extension becomes large. As we ...


7

I've found that for interchangeable lens camera lenses (at least for Olympus micro for thirds lenses) the minimal focus distance in the specs is measured from the sensor, while for compact cameras they usually give distance from the front end of the lens. That explains most of the difference.


7

You can get much closer to your subject with a lens designed as a macro lens. In your example #1, the 100 mm f/2 EF lens can only focus on subjects >3 ft away from the imaging sensor. In contrast the 100 mm f/2.8 Macro lens can get as close as one foot from the imaging sensor to the subject and achieve focus. This means the front of the lens is within about ...


6

Yes. Macro lenses can be used on subjects at more normal distances. They are not just for close up objects. You can shoot portraits with the 60mm or 105mm Micro for example, as those are good focal lengths for portraits. Macro lenses are generally very sharp, but bokeh may not be as nice as a standard lens.


6

Fairly simply, that lens is all three of: A macro lens, as it can produce magnifications which approach 1:1. A telephoto lens with a relatively long focal length and correspondingly small angle of view. A zoom lens with a variable focal length. These are three orthogonal concepts - as with this lens, it's perfectly possible for a lens to be all three of ...


6

Yes, you may use the MP-E 65mm lens on a Canon T3. No, you do not need any adapters. Just realize that the MP-E 65 is a different type of lens than what you are probably used to. Not only is it a manual focus only lens, but at each magnification setting there is only a single distance the lens is capable of focusing. The way most users focus is to set the ...


6

Neither of those lenses are really what most macro specialists would consider a macro lens. For a lens to be considered a true macro lens it should be able to project a life sized image of the subject onto the image sensor or film. If you're taking a picture of a 20mm long bug, a macro lens should be able to focus close enough to project an image of the bug ...


5

Summarizing the other answers and comments I think I can see how this is a solution to a structural problem. I'll outline it here so others can validate it: The macro lens in question has two element groups: one fixed in the rear barrel, the other fixed in the front barrel. Focused at infinity the distance between front and rear glass is 2.2". At its ...


5

Because most smartphones without an additional external macro lens do not have optical systems capable of taking photos at close enough minimum focal distances to produce macro photographs. Even if you define macro as the equivalent magnification needed for the tiny sensors found in most phones to produce a print comparable to one made when the image of a ...


5

From what I can gather, the average adult human iris diameter is about 12mm, so superimposing that onto your sensor size (about 22mm by 15mm) gives you an idea of what you'll get through a 1:1 lens like the one you mention. Other considerations will include: getting a subject to hold very still (not just their head, but their eyes) and/or being able to work ...


4

650-2600mm is an extreme telephoto lens. At 2600mm your angle of view will be about as wide as your thumbnail at arms length. You wouldn't even be able to get the whole of the moon in one shot. Also image quality is very poor due to the low cost construction. Not to mention that focussing, stability, light gathering ability, and even finding your subject are ...


4

As others have said, the main practical difference between true (1:1 or greater magnification) macro lenses is the distance to the subject required to achieve the desired magnification. In general, long macro lenses do not directly affect depth of field or most other parameters of the image. The main advantage of the longer focal lengths therefore, is that ...


4

You cannot do what you are asking to do. There is no lens which will give you the desired magnification combined with minimal focal distance to perform microscopic photos. Even if you took something like the Canon MP-E 65mm F2.8 1-5x macro and added a zoom element inbetween: you wouldn't be there. If you could somehow manage to get enough magnification: I ...


4

Nikon makes a 70-180mm macro zoom lens. It focuses down to a 1:1.3 magnification ratio -- not quite what is considered "true macro" -- but with the 6T close-up lens it gets to 1:1. Supposedly quite good, though I have no first-hand experience.


4

Like most consumer-grade variable aperture zoom lenses, this lens is a series of compromises carefully designed to do many jobs reasonably well. While, for example, it will take a very good photograph at 100mm, it will not have the same image quality from the center all the way to the corners as, say, a Zeiss Makro-Planar 100mm lens. However, it also doesn't ...


4

These lenses work basically like a magnifying glass (or reading glasses) in front of the lens. In fact, not just basically — actually exactly. That has the effect of decreasing the distance from the back of the lens to where an in-focus image is formed, which gives the lens more freedom to focus more closely. And focusing more closely is inherently all ...


4

The focal length of a lens only applies to objects at infinity, and is the distance (𝑓 in the diagram below) between the lens and the sensor when such an object is in focus. The focal point (F) would actually be ON the sensor. (image cropped from Wikipedia page) As an object gets closer to the sensor, the focal point moves away from the lens, meaning the ...


4

A macro lens' maximum magnification can only be achieved at minimum focus. So to get maximum magnification you must move the camera towards or away from the subject to focus a specific area of it. That is the main advantage of using a focus rail. In the case of stacking images, though, maximum magnification in every frame is probably of secondary ...


4

Personally, I think you need to bite the bullet and just carry both lenses. Two lenses is not a huge amount of gear, and the 100L Macro is arguably the best macro lens you can get for the Canon mount. You could rent an EF-S 60mm f/2.8 USM Macro for the trip, which is smaller/lighter than the 100L, but it's not going to replace an 18-135 for walkaround use, ...


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