22

The answer is here, from Nikon: Minimum Focus Distance The minimum focus distance is the shortest distance at which a lens can focus. In the case of digital SLR cameras, the distance to the subject is measured from the focal plane mark on the camera body, not from the front of the lens. Since the lens has a minimum focus distance of 18.5cm, and is 8....


19

I disagree with some of the things MikeW said. No matter what is between the subject and the sensor (or film), there will be light loss relative to what you would otherwise expect by considering only the f-stop. This is basic physics. The additional light loss relative to f-stop is 1/(1 + M)2, where M is the magnification from the real subject to its size ...


15

"What are the different types of macro lenses"? There are "Macro" lenses and there are Macro lenses. As others have mentioned, a true Macro lens will magnify the subject to a 1:1 ratio which is generally a desirable feature. Many lenses will be marketed as 'Macro' lenses even though they don't magnify down to 1:1 so be careful to check the actual ...


13

Every lens forms an image at a certain distance for a certain subject. In order for a lens to be "focussed" on the subject this image must land on the sensor. For an object at infinity, the lens forms an image at a distance of f, where f is the focal length. For an object close enough for 1:1 magnification the lens forms an image at a distance of 2*f, double ...


12

The 1:1 ratio means you can focus close enough that you can fill the frame with an object the same size as the sensor. I.e. for an APS-C DSLR this means you can focus on an object only 22mm wide. The 1:1 reproduction ratio is independent of focal length, you can have a 50mm macro and a 200mm macro both filling the frame with the same 22mm wide object, ...


12

A simple lens (like the lens in a pair of glasses) forms an image at a distance of f behind the lens for an object at infinity (where f is the focal length). The same lens will form an image at 2f behind the lens for an object 2f in front of the lens. This will achieve 1:1 magnification, i.e. the definition of macro. Thus any single element lens is a macro ...


12

Let's start with what is similar with all three of these lenses: They all have a focal length of 50mm. You should also be able to have a lot of overlapping focusing distances and aperture values. Now, to what's different. When it comes to a zoom lens, they tend * to have a different maximum aperture values that are smaller than with a prime. The advantage ...


11

Because most interchangeable lens cameras typically use larger-format sensors than 1/2.3"-format. The close-focusing capability of most small-sensored compacts comes from the fact that small sensors use proportionately short lenses. Very short lenses (those under 10mm focal lengths) tend to have very deep depth of field--deep enough to have close focus ...


10

As rfusca mentions, the quality of "macro filters" (more correctly termed "close-up filters/lens") are generally low, but there are a few that are generally well-liked. The key is to find achromatic offerings, which use more than one piece of glass to combat aberrations, and are fairly high quality. Much like the el-cheapo std close-ups, they can be had in a ...


10

If you own a Canon camera, then to really do macro photography like that you probably want the MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1-5x Zoom Macro lens. Unlike most macro lenses which max out at a 1:1 reproduction ratio, which is usually not quite enough to get close-up shots of bug parts, the MP-E 65mm macro is a zoom macro. It supports a magnification ratio between as low as ...


9

The MP-E 65mm is not a normal macro lens, it's a special lens for extreme macro only. If you need 5x magnification the MP-E 65mm is the only option on the market - so it's obviously better than the other options (well, you can potentially get 5x with extension rings or reversed lenses but the MP-E is the only lens that is designed to work at those extreme ...


9

Yes they work, I'm sometimes using one with my 100mm non-L macro with good results. However, there is a caveat: Canon and Sigma teleconverters do not work because they physically do not fit. There is a protruding bit at the front of the converter that fits into a corresponding cavity on the back of the lens - and only certain L Canon lenses have this. This ...


9

The minimum focus distance is a property of the lens and the distance to the sensor. The lens-to-sensor distance is the same for all Canon DSLRs hence the minimum focus distance doesn't change when using a cropped sensor body. There are adapters you can get to magnify the viewfinder image, here's a review of an offical Canon product, numerous third party ...


9

The Sigma 70-300 mm F4-5.6 DG APO Macro is a lens that is available for both Sigma cameras and as a third party lens for many other brands, among them Nikon. These different manufacturers uses different lens mounts and this particular lens is available for Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Pentax KAF, Sigma SA Bayonet and Sony/Minolta Alpha mounts. These mounts are ...


9

The focal length of a lens is a calculation made when the lens is imaging an object at infinity. This is a distance as far “as the eye can see” symbol ∞. As we focus on objects nearer than infinity, we must lengthen the distance, lens to sensor (film). The now elongated distance is called “back focus”. The lens to sensor/film extension becomes large. As we ...


8

These are not 'lenses' in the sense that most photogs think of the word. They're more like a magnifying glass that you screw on the end of the lens as a filter. Generally, they're not too great, especially since better, cheap options exist. Take a look at this question. Extension tubes are a great way to go. So is a reversal ring. Both of these ...


8

The accepted definition of a macro lens is a lens that can focus close enough in order to achieve a 1:1 reproduction ratio, that is project an image on the film plane or sensor that is the same size as the object. This means with a standard APS-C DSLR you can fill the frame with an object only 22mm across. This applies to macro lenses of any focal length, ...


8

Depth of Field Reversing a lens will produce a very shallow DOF. You may also get distortion and vignetting and have difficulty focusing, as you can only focus at a very narrow range of distances. From memory extension tubes have less DOF than a macro lens, but I am not certain of that. Light Loss You will lose 1-2 stops of light using extension tubes....


8

It depends on how you define fixed and variable. As you change the focus distance of many prime lenses, including some macro lenses, the actual focal length changes a little bit. Most fixed focal length lens' focal lengths are defined when the lens is focused on infinity and the light focused at the film/sensor plane is collimated when entering the lens. ...


8

This isn't a problem at all. The behaviour of the camera is normal. When the aperture is adjusted on the camera (eiter automatically or manually) the aperture of the lens wont change untill the moment when you take the shot. The reason to design the camera in this way is to maximize the available light (and microcontrast between out-of-focus and in focus ...


7

You can use this calculator to play around... http://www.eosdoc.com/manuals/?q=jlcalc I got close enough on a 1.3x crop just adding all three kenko extension tubes behind my Canon 100L macro. According to the calculator, that gave me a magnification of 1.45 (and then multiply by 1.25 to give 1.8). That's at .25m. Keep in mind the lens plus body ...


7

There is no possible answer to which is best because all macro lenses are not the same. Most macro lenses are very good, sharp and low distortion. Some may be even better. For the focal-length, the difference is distance. With 40mm macro you have to be very close. Some subjects fly away! With 100mm not so close and 200mm more space but faster shutter-speed ...


7

You can get much closer to your subject with a lens designed as a macro lens. In your example #1, the 100 mm f/2 EF lens can only focus on subjects >3 ft away from the imaging sensor. In contrast the 100 mm f/2.8 Macro lens can get as close as one foot from the imaging sensor to the subject and achieve focus. This means the front of the lens is within about ...


6

Yes The 5D will get better details than the 1.6 crop. A macro lens will resolve a certain number of line pairs per millimetre. Image sharpness is measured in line pairs per picture height, by using the same lens but with physically bigger sensor you will get more line pairs per picture height, hence more detail in your image. Another way to look at it is ...


6

Oddly, no. Lenses often have more aberrations towards the edges, so most them do not perform as well on a full-frame. By using a DSLR with a cropped sensor, you use the best performing part of the lens. To get the most out of it, you need high pixel density, so all the 18 MP Canon cropped DSLRs will do. The 7D among those is top-of-the line with a 100% ...


6

Fairly simply, that lens is all three of: A macro lens, as it can produce magnifications which approach 1:1. A telephoto lens with a relatively long focal length and correspondingly small angle of view. A zoom lens with a variable focal length. These are three orthogonal concepts - as with this lens, it's perfectly possible for a lens to be all three of ...


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