19

This is known as "banding". Dark parts in the picture have a small range of values (in a JPG, you only have 256 values per color), when you lighten them, you increase the gap between consecutive values as much as the values themselves. Since the gaps more or less follow a line they are very noticeable by our eyes. Several fixes are possible : If you have ...


17

The "ray" effect is known as sunstar. There are 2 conditions to achieve sunstars : use a narrow aperture (like f/16). point camera to small and bright light source. You achieved that effect very well. However, it doesn't serve the photograph. In the photo, the subject seems to be the moon. However, it is hard to tell it is the moon by looking at it only. ...


8

With a large sensor the sensor is more expensive (the production cost of a sensor grows at least as fast as its physical area). the whole device is bigger, and requires bigger lenses, that add to the overall cost. There are cameras with sensors larger than full-frame, not mentioning the instruments in any modern astronomical observatory, that are mostly a ...


8

Opening your aperture fully, so the actual aperture opening is circular, will get rid of the sunstars - but can give just too much of a halo (even more with a fast prime lens than with a small zoom!). The optimal choice of lens for your intent would be one that maintains a very near circular aperture no matter what aperture setting you choose - such will be ...


7

For all practical purposes: No. Photography is the recording of light. In the total absence of light there is nothing for a camera to record except the random noise generated by the camera itself. There are a few possible edge cases where one might be able to describe a room with all of the lights off and still be able to record something with a camera. It ...


7

More on the star effect...The aperture is created inside of your lens by overlapping petals, like this: The following is pulled from BH Photo Video's article on the subject (https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/tips-and-solutions/create-compelling-star-effects-sun-stars-starbursts-photos) The arms of the star are created from light ...


5

This is named banding. And it's caused in your case by overprocessing the image. What you can do is to take the photo in RAW and postprocess it. When postprocessing mask the sky and do not increase the exposure there. At the end night sky is dark. You can also take two photos, one as it is and one for the buildings. And mix them keeping sky dark and ...


4

If you are shooting ice hockey the exposure is probably biased by the white ice. Before you spend any money try to use the camera's exposure compensation to make the pictures lighter. The Wikipedia article starts with an example which is pretty close to your problem (shooting snowy mountains). Here are some more explanations on exposure compensation.


4

Many camera mounted speedlights and controllers have near-infrared AF assist lamps. They illuminate briefly when the shutter is half pressed and go out once focus is confirmed. Such AF assist lights require communication between the camera and transmitter (or flash) that use the proprietary pins for each brand that surround the standard center pin on the hot ...


3

What is my upgrade path from a D3400 for better low light performance, that will also increase my keeper rate? Lights, modifiers, and stands, not different cameras and more lenses. If you want to get serious about portraiture and headshots, you're going to have to learn how to use lights. For your currently stated budget you can outfit yourself fairly well....


2

I was wondering: how is it possible for a smaller sensor to perform better in low-light, if it is capturing much less light than the bigger sensor? Short answer: We don't know that it is capturing much less light than the bigger sensor. Longer answer: Smaller sensors capture less light than larger sensor when certain assumptions are made: Both cameras ...


2

Is there a reason to go with DSLR instead? There might be a slight one, depending on exactly what type of astrophotography you're planning on doing. The sensor is on and energized the entire time a mirrorless cameras is turned on. This creates heat that can affect the amount of camera generated "read noise." A DSLR's sensor is energized only when actually ...


2

Your wish is the wish of every other photographer in the world. The simple fact is that physics dictate what is possible, and the compromises you have to make are hard. Cameras do not do well in low light conditions. If you're indoors and needing high motion, you're going to need a strobe. Bounce it off the ceiling all the time to help mitigate the ...


2

So you could hit a button to turn on the light, get your focus, hit another button to turn off the light, then take the shot? Using a studio strobe, you typically have a modeling lamp. You don’t have to turn off the modeling light to shoot. They’re enough light for you to get an idea of the lighting and focus. But the strobe flash will greatly overpower the ...


2

It depends. Assuming both sensors have the same linear dimensions: If you are viewing the images from both sensors at the same display size, then the low light performance of both will be similar, assuming they use the same generation of technology. There are other advantages unrelated to low light S/N performance that make using a higher resolution sensor ...


1

That depends a lot on how you take the picture originally. If you properly expose it by using a sufficiently long shutter speed for the aperture and ISO in use, then you could probably get something that approximates what the room looks like with the lights on. But there would be significant differences, still - anything that moved during the long exposure ...


1

The f-stop is independent of the format. Same f-stop means that with a given light, you will have the same exposure time on equally sensitive film/sensors (same ISO). The f-stop already factors in the focal length... This said, the F-stop spec is not very accurate, and the movie industry seems to use T-stop. Actual focal length (that can vary with focusing ...


1

Even if you processed the raw files initially, when you upload them to sites such as google photos, they may compress them further to reduce the bandwidth needed to transmit them to viewers. This compression can also cause banding.


1

DSLR or mirrorless, either works just fine. Mirrorless will eventually displace DSLR, but then again DSLR lenses can be used for mirrorless cameras so you won't lose anything if you buy now the old technology. (Vice versa, mirrorless lenses can't be used on DSLRs.) For astrophotography, the answer is: yes! Yes! If you can afford it, full frame is really ...


1

"I was wondering: how is it possible for a smaller sensor to perform better in low-light, if it is capturing much less light than the bigger sensor?" It really isn't possible; unless there is a significant difference in the technology in use (i..e CCD/CMOS/BIS sensors). In this case both sensors are of the same design, but possibly different generations... ...


1

Just a few seemingly unrelated observations from looking through your most recent album posted to facebook: Select a shooting position that does not place an open door to the much brighter outdoors in the background. Instead, keep that light behind or about 90° to the side so that instead of fighting that light, you are using it to illuminate your subjects. ...


1

The best way to shoot indoors sports in most fairly evenly lit gyms/rinks/arenas is to set exposure manually. It gives you the most complete control over shutter times, aperture, and ISO. Keep in mind that manual exposure will be more accurate than automatic metering under flickering lights such as those found in most indoor sports arenas and outdoor ...


1

I was using an Asus Zenfone 3 and the manual mode was pretty good. After using it for two years I want to try a Canon EOS M100. But will it be a good option? It will be better (than your phone). But it will not be good by any reasonable measure of "good". M100 lacks viewfinder. As already explained, it lacks a hotshoe too. The ergonomics look very ...


1

Shot on the 11/2/2020 full digital zoom 1/80th sec 5.2 A iso 100 taken with a lumix fz150


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