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The Bulb mode allows users to set a very slow shutter speed for long exposure photography. https://www.practicalphotography.com/camera-advice/questions-and-answers/what-is-the-b-mode-on-my-camera-for


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Is there some sort of software that can accomplish this? Yes. Canon's "EOS Utility" will let you do this. Another simple way to do this is with a remote release that has a built-in interval timer (aka "intervalometer") which is a timer that can control the shutter in bulb mode (and other modes) to take a series of long exposure images. ...


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You need to use bulb mode, which will allow you take arbitrarily-long exposures. To enable bulb mode, first set your exposure to Manual, then just dial the shutter speed past 30 seconds, the next setting is "bulb". I recommend using a remote shutter release, such as the Canon BR-E1 Bluetooth remote. With the camera in bulb mode, one press of the ...


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You don't need other firmware to expose for longer than 30 seconds, you can simply use bulb mode. This is an explanation on what bulb mode is This video explains how you can use it on the M50. Probably your manual also describes how to use it (but I can't get the PDF to load at the moment). You'll find that keeping the shutter open manually in bulb mode is ...


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At North Myrtle Beach, the variation in waves is primarily a function of wind direction, speed and bottom contour. Wind will push water into waves in shallow areas. An offshore wind has time to build up wave height as it pushes with the surf motion. A wind blowing from shore out to sea pushes opposite the surf and tends to reduce the wave height. You can ...


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The simplest way is to use Lightroom. Select the healing tool, resize it using the scroll wheel of your trackball or mouse, and click on the hot pixel. Lightroom will automatically detect where suitable pixels exist to replace those missing when the hot-pixel is removed.


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Scottbb's answer tells you why it's there, and what you can do and what you can expect in the future, but as for the image you already have: Paint over it! I would use a "clone" tool, to paint over the bright spot by cloning some of the surrounding texture.


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I can't tell if they are hot or stuck pixels (see: Hot, stuck, or dead pixels. What's the difference?). Stuck and dead pixels are completely normal, they happen. As a matter of fact, there are almost certainly more stuck pixels in your camera than you even know about. The camera maintains a "pixel map" of known hot pixels, and automatically ...


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There are websites that cater to surfers that give predictions for wave height at various beaches. One that I know is wetsand.com. I have used it in the past but its certificate is questionable now. A web search turned up surfline.com and surf-forecast.com. I haven't tried them.


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Marine weather forecasts give the height of waves (Douglas scale) and general direction of the swell, but this is out at sea. In addition to this, waves that break on the shore are very dependent on local conditions: slope and orientation of the strand, local tide currents... When shooting a specific wave you have to see what comes next... the wave ebbs ...


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Luminance is simply brightness. To decrease it, you must allow less light in or reduce sensitivity. Using a shorter shutter-speed would automatically achieve this but since you are set on 30s, then you other options are: Lower ISO sensitivity, unless you are already at the lowest. This has the advantage of giving you higher image-quality until the native ...


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Yes, film exposure is affected by unusually long or short exposures (but not for normal photo exposure ranges). This is called reciprocity failure, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reciprocity_(photography) Digital is not affected by reciprocity, but noise becomes a problem at long exposures.


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In properly exposed photographs, the only difference you (the viewer) should see is if something in the frame was in motion during the exposure. A sufficiently fast exposure will effectively freeze the object in motion. A longer exposure will blur the object.


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