8 votes
Accepted

How do I prevent the "light rays" coming off the moon in a photo like this?

The small aperture (f/22) is the cause of the spikes. You could have used f/8 at ISO 100 for the same exposure and it would have reduced the spikes significantly, if not eliminate them altogether. If ...
3 votes

How does long exposure works on camera?

When you take a picture, the camera lens projects an image of the outside world onto the surface of a light sensitive surface. Initially a trapdoor (shutter) blocks the projected image. When you press ...
  • 36.6k
2 votes

How does long exposure works on camera?

@AlanMarcus' answer is correct, but I feel it might be missing the point of the question. Or maybe I'm missing it. I feel like the question is asking how long exposure can work on digital devices. In ...
1 vote

Stars at night without long shutter speed lines

You would typically use an equatorial tracking mount. This is a motorized mount that tracks the apparent movement of the sky. The inexpensive systems run about USD 400. You can get an idea of what is ...
  • 2,563
1 vote

How do I prevent the "light rays" coming off the moon in a photo like this?

You'd like to see the moon as you see it at night? Well, how do you see it at night? You might not realise, but the moon is a very bright object – it's lit by the sun. We usually naturally see it as ...
  • 9,241
1 vote

How do I prevent the "light rays" coming off the moon in a photo like this?

You can't. You use for this image high value for aperture and long shutter speed. The aperture make the rays. The long exposure make the moon as bright spot. The usual settings to take photo of the ...
  • 9,721
1 vote

Will stacking more images produce more detail in this galaxy photo?

I tried DSS many times over the course of a year. I was delaying on getting APP. I finally took the dive and got APP and it's game changing. If you want to stack your photos and actually see results, ...

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