7

This is due to the low sensitivity of the plate... Around 0.001 ISO for a daguerreotype. Photography chemistry made some progress in two centuries. This said, in the film era, 100ISO (100ASA, actually) was a fast film (about the fastest color film you could get), and the regular color film of the 60/70s was 25ISO/ASA.


5

Marine weather forecasts give the height of waves (Douglas scale) and general direction of the swell, but this is out at sea. In addition to this, waves that break on the shore are very dependent on local conditions: slope and orientation of the strand, local tide currents... When shooting a specific wave you have to see what comes next... the wave ebbs ...


5

No need for post processing. Relative to the camera, the motorcycle and rider are not moving (unless the rider waves the selfie-stick) so they are sharp. The background (clouds and landscape) are changing very little due to the distance, so they also look sharp. The road and nearby shoulder to move quickly relative to the camera, so are subject to motion ...


5

Stacking more images reduces noise to signal ratio, but don't add resolution or details. In order to enhance resolution, my advice is to use a prime lense, instead of a zoom one. Even if it has less focal length. In my personal experience, I get more details with a 80mm prime than with a 55-250mm at 200mm


4

In my limited experience (back when Astrostack was the hot item, and using video captured at 640x480 with a webcam -- call it 1998 or so), stacking more frames will decrease the appearance of noise by averaging it away, but won't increase detail beyond about double the actual pixel resolution of the image (you only get that much because the image wanders a ...


4

Yes, but No. Your question is will it produce more detail, and yes stacking more images will reduce noise which will let you see more detail. And at least as important, you are taking calibration frames. But this is all post processing. Post processing will get you from to Or from But, it will never get you from to (Each first image is an ...


4

At North Myrtle Beach, the variation in waves is primarily a function of wind direction, speed and bottom contour. Wind will push water into waves in shallow areas. An offshore wind has time to build up wave height as it pushes with the surf motion. A wind blowing from shore out to sea pushes opposite the surf and tends to reduce the wave height. You can ...


3

There are websites that cater to surfers that give predictions for wave height at various beaches. One that I know is wetsand.com. I have used it in the past but its certificate is questionable now. A web search turned up surfline.com and surf-forecast.com. I haven't tried them.


3

Film blackened by exposure and developing has long been used as a neutral density filter for viewing the sun during an eclipse. While this procedure produces a safe to use filter for visual use, it has its drawbacks. X-ray film generally has an emulsion on both sides, thus it has twice the density of pictorial film. This density is due to the accumulation of ...


2

I've had my RB67 Pro for a few years now, and have occasionally done long exposures using two separate cable releases. Mamiya's double cable release is no different, as it is virtually a 2-in-1 cable release. You may as well use a hairpin to set off the shutter when the lens is in mirror up mode. So, unfortunately, the only way to close the shutter in T ...


2

You can try to do the task by explicitly define loop and interval: for i in $(seq 1 30) do gphoto2 --set-config bulb=1 --wait-event=120s --set-config capturetarget=1 sleep 1 done


2

To properly answer your question, I think a course in light metering and exposure would be necessary, but this is beyond the scope of this forum. I will try to keep it short. Your question is by no means confined to the boundaries of Polaroid cameras. As a matter of fact, the answer to this question applies to photography in general, be it film or digital. ...


2

These are so called hot or dead pixels, small sensor defects that are always there and are exacerbated by long exposures of mostly dark scenes. These are the reason that there are "long exposure noise reduction" options on most cameras, these take a second exposure of equal length with the shutter closed, and look for pixels that aren't black even though ...


2

With shooting a foreground and the sky, you've got a couple of choices: A) You can use multiple shots and then blend them together in post processing. A minimum would be two exposures - one to properly expose the foreground and one for the sky. That being said, if you're going to blend things, you may as well go big and start at a proper exposure for the ...


2

If you use continuous light, even against a well-darkened backdrop, the dart will show only as a faint streak. If the dart takes 120 ms to fly from hand to board, any given position's image will last only a fraction of a millisecond, and continuous lights bright enough to record the dart well will be huge, hot, and expensive. A repeating electronic flash ...


2

You need to use bulb mode, which will allow you take arbitrarily-long exposures. To enable bulb mode, first set your exposure to Manual, then just dial the shutter speed past 30 seconds, the next setting is "bulb". I recommend using a remote shutter release, such as the Canon BR-E1 Bluetooth remote. With the camera in bulb mode, one press of the ...


2

You don't need other firmware to expose for longer than 30 seconds, you can simply use bulb mode. This is an explanation on what bulb mode is This video explains how you can use it on the M50. Probably your manual also describes how to use it (but I can't get the PDF to load at the moment). You'll find that keeping the shutter open manually in bulb mode is ...


2

The simplest way is to use Lightroom. Select the healing tool, resize it using the scroll wheel of your trackball or mouse, and click on the hot pixel. Lightroom will automatically detect where suitable pixels exist to replace those missing when the hot-pixel is removed.


1

Scottbb's answer tells you why it's there, and what you can do and what you can expect in the future, but as for the image you already have: Paint over it! I would use a "clone" tool, to paint over the bright spot by cloning some of the surrounding texture.


1

I can't tell if they are hot or stuck pixels (see: Hot, stuck, or dead pixels. What's the difference?). Stuck and dead pixels are completely normal, they happen. As a matter of fact, there are almost certainly more stuck pixels in your camera than you even know about. The camera maintains a "pixel map" of known hot pixels, and automatically ...


1

Luminance is simply brightness. To decrease it, you must allow less light in or reduce sensitivity. Using a shorter shutter-speed would automatically achieve this but since you are set on 30s, then you other options are: Lower ISO sensitivity, unless you are already at the lowest. This has the advantage of giving you higher image-quality until the native ...


1

I don't have an answer on whether or not this will succeed (my feeling is it won't because the flight is too dim), but if you have access to the camera the most practical thing would be to just try. The largest unknown is the brightness of the luminous flight, that makes it hard to predict. A first step would be to see if the camera registers the luminous ...


1

Observations: You are summing the values of each pixel, but your exposureAdjust() function assumes that after conditioning, each pixel will be in the range [0, 1). This is not correct. Assume a pixel's value in each of the 3 input images is, say, 50% full-scale (thus, 213 = 8192). Summing that three times yields 3 * 8192 = 24,576. Then the result after ...


1

For 4 to 8 minutes -- 2/3 to 1 f-stop compensation is all you need apply.


1

That is a processing failure. Light leaks are never straight lines and never create two distinct halves. Send your camera in for repair. Include your reference image. You may want to reinstall the firmware and see if that eliminates it but that is a longshot.


1

Tamron manual VC instructions below. Note in particular: 1. Turn the VC switch OFF when using tripod. 2. The VC mechanism may introduce errors during long exposures. 3. When the shutter button is pressed down halfway, it takes about 1 second for the VC to provide a stable image. 4. When VC is not used, set the switch off. How to use VC mechanism 1) Set ...


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