10

Think about what happens in a fireworks display. Essentially, the sky is black. Within the sky, a series of bright lights turn themselves on and then off in random places. The important thing to realise is that each firework is its own shutter! You need to set your ISO and aperture so that each firework's "natural shutter" results in a correct exposure of ...


9

Not a problem with your equipment. They are reflections of the clouds. Non-smooth water will cause vertical smears. The effect is subtle here, but it is more obvious when the sun is reflected. Why does sunset over a body of water cause a path of light stretching towards the horizon? Edit: More evidence, an example of vertical smearing from my library: ...


8

TL;DR: Get the best 10-stop filter you are willing to afford. There are several to choose from, compared to shopping for a 9-stop filter. In no particular order, some considerations: This is very specific to the exact location you're shooting, but in my experience, the waterfall scene is darker than the Sunny 16 rule indicates. Usually, there's a bit of ...


8

It doesn't matter much which filter you get. If you get the "wrong" one, you will have gained invaluable XP that will contribute to your continued advancement in photography. Options to consider: Don't get either filter. Since you will be using a tripod, you can use your current filter (or no filter) to take and blend multiple exposures. You can also play ...


7

Use a tripod, take a shot of surroundings during an intermission (or even better, at dusk, before the fireworks start), and then shoot the fireworks. Blend the images in post production (this is a case where accurate overlap isn't even necessary).


6

There are many ways to tackle fireworks. A lot of it is experimental. I found that I get near perfect handheld results with a 22mm to 35mm lens at around f/2.0 or f/2.8, ISO800 to ISO1250 and a shutter speed of 1/30 to 1/50. I keep the camera on Servo with continuous shooting. It allows for shots that have the light streaks but keeps the highlights just ...


5

No need for post processing. Relative to the camera, the motorcycle and rider are not moving (unless the rider waves the selfie-stick) so they are sharp. The background (clouds and landscape) are changing very little due to the distance, so they also look sharp. The road and nearby shoulder to move quickly relative to the camera, so are subject to motion ...


5

This is a known issue with the Nikon 18-200 ƒ/3.5–5.6 VR lens. Some people have reported a simple workaround, some others report the workaround doesn't work. The Problem Apparently the VR mechanism inside the lens emits some infrared radiation, enough that it can be picked up in some cases, especially in long-exposure photography. Although, 30 seconds at ...


5

These were taken with a Canon 700D with a 22 mm lens f/10 2,5 sec ISO 200 I had the camera set on a tripod and I was shooting with a remote control continuously leaving 1/2 seconds the camera cool before the next shot regardless of what was happening in front of me. Most of the shots showed nothing remarkable, but I got several nice shots.


4

For starters you could put the filter in the closest slot, to close the gap a bit. If it's still noticeable, I'd try some black electrical tape over the gap. Remember to take it off again before you put it away for any length of time. It's the kind of tape that's easy on/off to start with, but gets horribly slimy if you forget it for 6 months. Potentially ...


3

The subject is in complete darkness, so a long exposure (1 or 2 seconds) combined with a bit of camera wobble makes the lights in the picture leave trails like that but you don't get a blurry subject. Combine that with a camera flash (1/1000s maybe?) which illuminates the subject and there you have it. (the flash also dimly illuminates the objects in the ...


3

A related question is whether you actually need 10 or 20 second exposures. Anything over a second or so will already look pretty smooth and you might find that you get more interesting results in the 1/4 or 1/8 range where there is still a hint of the original waves. You'll probably find no practical difference between 9 and 10 stop filters. You can ...


3

The iPhone cameras (at least of today) are hardware-limited to 1/4s shutter speeds. Most apps with full-manual control will only go this far, and any longer shutter features they offer are accomplished with in-software stacking. It might be hard to get the look of your image with just a 1/4 sec shutter, but not impossible. If you were just shooting the ...


2

I'd double-check that there is no accessory for your filter holder that blocks light. Mine has plastic gaskets that go over the filter holder that have plastic gaskets that seal up the space above the filter. Here's the gasket halfway off: And here's the gasket that covers the filter(s): I also use a soft lens bag to cover the lens, which in your case, ...


2

These are so called hot or dead pixels, small sensor defects that are always there and are exacerbated by long exposures of mostly dark scenes. These are the reason that there are "long exposure noise reduction" options on most cameras, these take a second exposure of equal length with the shutter closed, and look for pixels that aren't black even though ...


1

Observations: You are summing the values of each pixel, but your exposureAdjust() function assumes that after conditioning, each pixel will be in the range [0, 1). This is not correct. Assume a pixel's value in each of the 3 input images is, say, 50% full-scale (thus, 213 = 8192). Summing that three times yields 3 * 8192 = 24,576. Then the result after ...


1

For 4 to 8 minutes -- 2/3 to 1 f-stop compensation is all you need apply.


1

That is a processing failure. Light leaks are never straight lines and never create two distinct halves. Send your camera in for repair. Include your reference image. You may want to reinstall the firmware and see if that eliminates it but that is a longshot.


1

I've found that experimentation and practice leads to the best results over time! But here's a few little tips I've picked up from other photographers and practice. Get there when there is still some light, this can give you a better vantage point and perhaps give you an idea of surfaces that the fireworks may reflect off (water etc...). You may choose to ...


1

You have a few choices of tastes Do you want streaks or little dots of light? Do you want the center flash captured? Generally you want to NOT overexpose in digital Fireworks are generally LV = 3 ISO 100, SS 2S, f-stop f/4 Under 1 sec will require timing by you Over 4s you may get too many fireworks overlapping 100 2s f/4 400 2s f/8 800 2s f/11 ...


1

Light is reflecting off the back of the filter. You can plainly see the reflection of the front of the lens bouncing off the back of the filter. Some type of makeshift hood that attaches to the front of the filter holder may solve the issue if the light were entering in front of and passing through the filter. But it's fairly obvious from your photo of the ...


1

Controlling contrast like that would usually mean going for a low contrast developer. If you're into homebrewing you could try POTA or Delagi #8; the recipes are freely available. Stand developing with very dilute solutions of more conventional developers might work. Reciprocity failure is going to be a beast. Pota was originally formulated to deal with the ...


1

In addition to my comment for using something to cast a shadow on the lens... Here is my rig, a 16-35 f/4 with Formatt-Hitech's 100mm square filter holder attached. Both are shaded under a Canon soft lens bag with the bottom cut out. I don't know if the bag is 100% lightproof, but it's been good enough so far. Good luck!


1

Tamron manual VC instructions below. Note in particular: 1. Turn the VC switch OFF when using tripod. 2. The VC mechanism may introduce errors during long exposures. 3. When the shutter button is pressed down halfway, it takes about 1 second for the VC to provide a stable image. 4. When VC is not used, set the switch off. How to use VC mechanism 1) Set ...


1

I have a tripod but when I can't use it (sometimes it's forbidden) I have this. With the three adjustable pegs you can easily set your camera horizontal even if the surface isn't (chair, window sill...). Works even with my rather heavy EOS70D+standard zoom lens. You can also use it (in portrait mode) to hold the camera vertical against a round church ...


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