19

The only thing that means is that it is recommended that the sun does not enter directly thru the window. See what happens if the window is pointing north (on the northern hemisphere). From autumn to spring the sun will be on the south side of your house, so will not hit the north window. In summer (northern hemisphere) if you live below the tropic the sun ...


13

Calton Hill, Edinburgh, Scotland; the view is similar but not identical to this photo.


6

They can use machine learning to guess location from photo Guessing the location of a randomly chosen Street View image is hard, even for well-traveled humans. But Google’s latest artificial-intelligence machine manages it with relative ease. [...] “PlaNet is able to localize 3.6 percent of the images at street-level accuracy and 10.1 percent at ...


5

You can search the images in http://images.google.com by providing the url/upload of the image when the image is popular but no geolocation is available. According result from Google's image search, the first one is likely shoot in Jiuzhaigou, China. The second one is likely shoot in Luoping, China.


5

I found this partial solution here at StackExchange. While I am not sure of the precision to which this calculation is made, it is a first step. Now, if only the results could be calculated for a specified area and then laid over a map as a contour plot to show sunrise and sunset times... Same goes for the moon! Thanks in advance to @erikwkolstad ☺ Not for ...


5

The Photographer's Ephemeris is a very popular app used by landscape photographers who need to know when the Moon/Sun is going to be at specific spots. It may be of great help to you.


4

You can use geotag software. This is java software and should run on your Mac machine. Load photos (drag and drop may work) In case of need you can adjust time/timezone of photos Then File->Load tracks from file Select images you want to write location Right click, Save new location->Selected images


4

Interestingly, Google Earth Pro allows you to change the time of day in 3D mode to see a representation of how the shadows will fall due to topographical features. I can't say that it's the best, but it will give a general idea... Here's the Grand Tetons at ~7:30PM And at 8:00 AM


4

In the southern hemisphere south of the tropics you would use a south-facing window. In the tropics it becomes a bit tricky: From late March until late September the sun is north of the equator and you would use a south-facing window if you were exactly on the equator. From late September until late March the sun is south of the equator and you would use a ...


3

Depending on "high" in elevation there are free public places that will, if nothing else, get you above street level, with views over streets and long avenues. These include the High Line Park, which is usually open till a couple of hours after sunset depending on the season, or Tudor City, above 42nd Street, which is a street and open 24 hours. There's ...


2

The most obvious one has a spectacular view of the city: the Empire State Building. The observation deck is fenced, but in such a way that you can fit a camera lens through and it's open until 2:00 AM (last elevator ride up is 1:15 AM). Anyways, plenty of detail on their website and I definitely recommend it.


2

It may be a bit late for this, but be sure to check whether the arboretum has any photo policies. I know that in two locations I looked into here, one prohibits commercial photography unless the photographer purchases a license. The other was fine with small groups, but they've got some guidelines about behavior and the size of your entourage (ex: stay on ...


2

ModelMayhem is definitely the way to go in the USA. You have some newcomers, but they have still not the reach of the original. Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr are great too, because models follow other models, so once you have found an US model page/profile, just go to the users she/he follows and to the suggestions.


2

I came across a website called Pashadelic. From what I can tell, they are trying to aid photographers find and discover great location for landscape photography. Their map is quite advance allowing you to load information such as panoramio photos and allowing you to see the sun/moon position. It's still in beta but I see a potential. http://pashadelic.com/...


1

I figured out how to do it in adobe Lightroom. I add my photos to my LR catalogue by importing them to the catalogue. Go to the map portion of the program - the photos will stay displayed in the filmstrip on the bottom of the screen. In the map search bar at top, type in where the photo was taken then the map comes up in the window. I select the photos I ...


1

Nikon View NX-i can copy Geo-tag info to other pictures, see here: https://nikonimglib.com/nvnxi/onlinehelp/en/nk107000.html I don't know if it will open Iphone pictures and read their geo-tag info though, you would have to try. If you like to have geo-tag info, I would recommend just using an app for it. I have gps4cam pro, and it works perfectly. I haven'...


1

For the Sun and most major celestial objects, this US Naval Observatory tool may be what you want. However, I suspect it is not exactly what you are seeking, as you seem to be interested in local obstructions somewhere in your line of sight. Data for that would seem an extremely difficult job to know. Use Form B for international locations. You will need to ...


1

Top of the Rock. Nice view of Empire State and Manhattan. The upper deck has just a low fence. Empire State is great during the night because it has a view towards Time Square and is much less busy then. Instead of a tripod, carry a bean bag.


1

I don't know if this is what you want but the built in Photos app on iPhone can show you on a map all the locations of previously taken photos. Just tap "Places" along the bottom navigation bar of the Photos app. (On the right, next to Albums and Photo Stream).


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