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27

As far as I know, the best bet for Linux is Darktable. Workflow management with raw and JPEG editing all in one. Some teaser images from their screenshot site:


17

How does one delete rejected photos from within Darktable Use 'Delete' button (Lightroom mode, right panel, 'Selected Image(s)' module): it "physically deletes" selected images from disk. It helps to display only previously rejected images by setting 'View' filter (Lightroom mode, top panel) to 'rejected only'. For faster use, you can associate a hotkey ...


12

If you are looking for something closer in spirit to Aperture or Lightroom, consider Darktable. Open source, all that. http://www.darktable.org/ Its not as polished as Aperture or Lightroom, but it works, and is free. It has an active development group, and it gets better all the time.


11

Ffmpeg will do it. If you have images img001.jpg, img002.jpg, img003.jpg, ... then on the command line do: ffmpeg -i img*.jpg output.mpeg There are more options given in ffmpeg --help or man pages, or the web. These allow control over the frame rate and the output format.


10

The answer is: yes — color management must be enabled in both places, and the profile must be loaded in each application. The system-wide profile does two things: Loads the Video LUT at login. This look-up-table includes color temperature and gamma correction, but that's it. (This is via gcm-apply) Provides a way (using colord, on modern systems) for ...


9

First we rename all *.JPG files based on their creation date. Sometimes cameras change the file name or just ordering them is somehow not what we want. However, renaming them by the creation date always work: jhead -n%Y%m%d-%H%M%S *.JPG After that we put this list in a file: ls -1tr | grep -v files.txt > files.txt And then use mencoder to create an ...


9

You can use cross-platform open source software jhead, with the options jhead -autorot *.jpg Which losslessly rotates the images based on the embedded rotation flag (and removes that flag, of course.


8

Fuji X10 is supported by dcraw. Maybe UFRaw will support that one too, thought it does not contain the camera on supported cameras list. UFRaw uses dcraw as its backend.


8

The issue you're going to have is two-fold. The X10's EXR sensor is not something other cameras have, save for a couple of Fuji cameras. The EXR sensor can do a lot of things with the available pixels in the sensor and that is why their RAW files are a little odd compared to those of say the X-Pro1 or 100 which use the X-Trans sensors. You'll potentially ...


8

The only one comparable which I have tried is Bibble Pro. The product has since been bought by Corel which now produces AfterShot Pro from the same technology. Overall, I found Bibble Pro to perform extremely well. They claimed 10X times faster than Lightroom and my measurements were close to that. The filtering and search was very intuivie and powerful too....


8

heads-up, this is not a complete answer; it might help you get to the solution though Your linux environment is perfect of Phil Harvey's ExifTool The stand alone tool might have a way to be scripted to do this. One dirty trick is to use timestamps and bracket bias data to collect images. There is a Perl library too. Also see webhdrtools which is based ...


8

I would look into hacking a GoPro camera/camcorder to use a continuous power source. The GoPro is very well suited to harsh environments, and already comes with a housing that could be utilized. Further, it is very reasonably priced. If you are serious about low light ability, the newest Hero3 Black Edition claims 2x better low light ability then the ...


8

Here is the process I use: cd ~/directory_with_raw_files ufraw-batch --out-type=tif --out-depth=8 --wb=camera --exposure=0.33 --black-point=auto *.NEF Of course, you will process CR2 files instead of NEF. I usually open just the first raw file to find acceptable parameters for ufraw-batch, such as exposure. Then install the stacking package: sudo apt-...


8

I assume you have a gradient in overall brightness due to unevben lighting. If that's the case, what you could do is to duplicate the layer with the image and apply the best correction to each part of the image on a different layer: curves for contrast, color balance or desaturate for white balancing. Then, using layer masks you can paint each region with ...


7

So I've decided to do the following: I'm going to buy a used Nikon D40 kit with the 18-55 lens off of eBay for about $200. To power it I'm going to use a $9 Nikon EP-5 power supply connector and a 18W 12v to 9v buck converter I found for $4. For communications, I'm going to try a $7 10m USB 2.0 Active Extension / Repeater Cable. I'm going to modify a PVC ...


6

This is a native software you could use: http://entangle-photo.org/ Edit: And this too: http://www.darktable.org/


6

I recommend darktable. It has the features you need, plus some more. It is not overwhelming though. I like it, because the original photos are not modified. A recipe file with the postprocessing instruction is stored instead. You will need decent amount of memory (8GB+).


6

Lightroom 4 will look at GPS data and pulls Google maps to show you where you've taken your pictures and lets you search/filter by location, among other things.


6

In the Mask tab you can select regions of the picture that you don't want Hugin to use in the final panorama. You just have to be careful to not mask out a part of the panorama that only exists in that low-res picture, because then you will get a hole.


6

Decoding the ini file is possible, but translating them exactly into darkroom/shotwell edits is going to be problematic. The image manipulation algorithms are different. Your best bet is to export high quality JPEGs (or if you have a lot of disk space you can use TIFFs) and keep the RAWs as an archive. This is the approach I have taken as I moved from ...


6

Since you have a D5300, the answer is clear — Darktable just added support for that camera in version 1.4.2, at which point it was listed as "experimental". Darktable 1.6 was released a month ago (December 2014), so upgrading to that should solve your issue. If it doesn't, I'd add your feedback (and a sample file?) to this issue tracker request: Feature #...


6

Every image format (JPEG, PNG, TIFF, etc.) that I know of can only represent rectangular images. This means that unless you define your own image format, this simply cannot be done. The only thing you can do is to work with transparency. Even though the image itself will still be rectangular, if only a circular portion of it is opaque, it will look like a ...


5

It looks like currently you can't just plug it in and have Shotwell work out-of-the-box, but if you don't mind a little work, you can mount the camera via "PTP" mode and then import the images from the filesystem. See this blog entry from someone who did this on FreeBSD; the Linux situation will be similar. Probably eventually the software will gain direct ...


5

A reasonable answer to this would be "it depends" (another perspective is to "battle a little against the idea of objective metrics") I'd recommend consulting this chart to determine how long you should spend trying to figure out a quicker way if 'quickness' is what you are looking for. However if you decide to approach this as an exercize in ...


5

In the past when attempting to install Photoshop on Linux, I've had little success. In reality there is probably no foolproof solution that will allow Photoshop to run without any problems, though there may be a few more things you can try: Install using PlayOnLinux PlayOnLinux is a program similar to Wine, though is designed primarily to run Windows games ...


5

Exiftool reads many raw formats. You can use a command similar to this one to rename your photo files : exiftool '-filename<CreateDate' -d %y%m%d_%H%M%S%%-c.%%le -r -ext cr2 /path/to/pictures Change cr2 to whatever your raw extension is, and /path/to/pictures to the desired folder. Once renamed, you can sort them by name. There are more examples ...


5

Most every DSLR/SLT/DSLM - certainly major brands like Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax - saves to SD or CF cards in a standard format, and additionally supports USB mass storage protocol, you DO NOT NEED any drivers installed on a host computer to be able to access the images taken. Tethering, or upgrading camera firmware, might indeed prove difficult from a ...


5

OSX-only options G3 / F3 Godox/Flashpoint has released an OSX version of the G3/F3 updater. However, at this time, it only supports updates for the following devices: V1 for Pentax TT350-P and Xpro-P AD400 Pro Flashpoint R2 Pro II For all other devices, or from Linux, however there are a few different ways you can do this, if you don't want to, say, ...


4

Exiftool is a very powerful utility to sort and organize photos automatically. See RENAMING EXAMPLES section of its manual. A new directory can be specified by setting the value of the Directory tag. For example, the following command moves all images originally in directory "DIR" into a directory hierarchy organized by year/month/day: exiftool "-...


4

While you can find several "automator"-style programs for Linux (there's also one specific for working with images, though I can't remember the name off the top of my head). But if you really want something advanced (and possibly cross-platform), I believe your best option is to develop something yourself. Personally, I quite like Python for such tasks (...


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