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6

You have flare. That's the light wrapping around the edges of her body, particularly pronounced in her left (camera right) armpit and hand. The background is spilling too much light onto her. Light the background completely separately from your subject. You want to get your subject farther from the background and light it with a more directional light and/...


5

I don't understand why the 2nd image wouldn't be correctly exposed as the Speedlight fires normally (this is what triggers the 2 x Studio lights), even if the studio lights were having no effect! Sounds like the studio lights are firing at the wrong time. Are you using ETTL mode? With ETTL, the camera fires a pre-flash to judge the exposure, and then takes ...


5

Would this be considered bokeh or does a term even exist for this? I agree with Romeo Ninov's comment: this is plain old motion blur. You could call it "light trails" to make it clear that it's something you're doing on purpose, but photos of light trails are generally created by having the lights move rather than the camera. Bokeh refers to the way ...


4

It's hard to say for sure without some additional information (things such as what are the pixel x pixel dimensions of the example you've posted, what are the exact specifications of the sensor in your drone's camera, what ISO setting was the camera using, etc., for instance), but to my eye it looks like where "hot" pixels were not quite ...


4

I can think of two reasons to keep some distance between studio lights and a ceiling: Reflection, if the studio lights have so much spread that the light reflects against the ceiling, this can cause problems. Solution: use some frame to reflect the light, of change the direction of the lights more downward. Fire hazards .. studio lights can get very hot and ...


3

It might have been slight condensation on the lens if it was perfectly fine and then "without warning" things got hazy. I don't know what the temperature /humidity was like but on clear nights things exposed to the night sky can cool by radiating their heat to said sky. If the temperature falls below the dew point condensation will form. This is a known ...


3

I would go with "motion blur trails", or "motion blur light trails". Light trails in general are the lines produced when an object moves during a long exposure — see How to shoot light trail photos with iPhone? and also When should you use a normal flash vs a second-curtain flash? In this case, of course, the object that moves is the camera, which from a ...


2

Edited after OP added "sample" photo they like. It seems to me that second picture carries very distinct silhouette of river bank (reminds me of Big Ben tower in London) and also a lot of rhythmic on light blobs. Your image (first) is more of strokes of light with subject obscured, it is much more abstract; plus ther eseems to be a lot of motion blur, not ...


2

I'd agree that the light is an LED panel. Judging from reflection cast and the years I've done lighting for shoots, I'd say it's a yellow gel. Warm LEDs aren't quite warm enough (I usually end up putting a weak yellow gel over them) to get a non-fluorescent view of a subject indoors. It was definitely the camera flash that cast the blue xenon-esque color on ...


2

There are details... Flash is rated as watt seconds (electrical energy input). A continuous light is only useful for photography while the shutter is open. Watts is its rate of energy. A 250 watt continuous bulb through a one second shutter is 250x1 = 250 watt seconds, but at 1/100 second is 250x1/100 which is only 2.5 watt seconds. Huge difference. The ...


1

Edit now that an example photo has been added to the question: Please see the section below headed with Are you sure the photo is blurry at all? Please pay particular attention to the first linked question here at Photography at StackExchange, Blown out blue/red light making photos look out of focus . The image is overexposed. This is the cause both of ...


1

The light is an led panel with either warm leds or a yellow gel on top and it's not pointed directly at the model. The camera flash has also been triggered which gives off the blueish color on the model's clothes. The flash is also visible in the reflection.


1

I'm really not seeing a commonality bringing images this blog together. Many of them are high key, but they aren't all; many of them have a raised black-point, but not all do. There's a very wide range of styles. (See How can this brightly colored yet gentle pastel-color effect be achieved? for that.) Some of them have a color cast added (as is often used ...


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