9

These features affect only the JPEG generated in-camera. For RAW processing, you can achieve the same results in Canon's DPP. Or use LR.


7

Here's my photography-centric answer. How often do you need to do this? Pretty much just once for the full collection. Maybe the equivalent once every few years. At 10 seconds an image, this is going to be done in under ten days. So, just let it go and worry about something else for ten days. I know this goes against the generally-admirable instinct to do ...


7

If you look at any color wheel, you have two axes on the wheel: To correct any color cast, this is usually enough. You can correct the main source of color shift in natural light on the temp axis (blue/yellow), and then do the fine tuning on the tint axis (magenta/green). Tint most often occurs through artificial light. magenta red | ...


6

DNG convertor is standalone software, independent of any other software. Adobe camera RAW/Lightroom are part of Adobe Creative cloud. So updating DNG convertor have nothing to do with updates of Adobe Creative cloud. By definition (simplified): DNG convertor - convert RAW files to DNG, free Adobe Creative Cloud - Lightroom/Photoshop/etc. - photo ...


5

The reason is, that the RAW RAF file is not an image per se. It is sensor data. To display it, the data has to be interpreted into an image. This is done by a piece of code and takes a little while. Being interpretation, the result may differ between programs. What you see in Windows is that the explorer or most editors shows you a low-res jpg which is ...


4

A quirk that I have found with the Lightroom versions I have used [LR3 through Classic'19 at time of writing] is that they've been designed to 'play nice' with other programs by not willingly sucking up every last resource they can get their hands on. Instead they will use a moderate resource level to avoid bogging the system down entirely and preventing ...


3

Which is generally preferred? How does enabling this feature in the camera affect the RAW file that gets generated, and can RAW image managers detect that the camera has already applied a correction? The in-camera correction is only applied to JPEG images (or previews) generated by the camera. In-camera correction has absolutely no effect on the contents of ...


3

You should go in Lightroom menu Edit->Catalog Settings, Metadata tab and check on "Automatically write changes into XMP" This will activate creation XMP files for any of your edited, rated, commented image. Then (before you erase the files from local disk) you copy those XMP files to the NAS, in to the same directory where the same (original) files are ...


3

I always do the color grading stuff before, because if done after retouching it can make the editing more visible. The edited parts are always a bit different from their surroundings and will react differently to the color tools.


3

Unfortunately you can’t use the color mixer with a local adjustment brush in Lightroom. What you can do is to brush the area which covers the sky only and then you can make adjustments to color temperature, saturation or vibrance for the brushed area, without affecting the unbrushed areas. By using a cooler color temperature, the blue color should be more ...


3

If I understood your question correctly, you are looking for a tool to reduce the time made during the culling process. You can use software like FilterPixel to cull your photos automatically. How does this work? Step 1: When you come from a photoshoot, you can drag and drop all your photos into Adobe Lightroom. You can select a folder that you want to cull ...


3

There is no way I can imagine that the same jpg can one day be 'clean' & another day be 'grainy', then the next back to 'clean', unless it is being viewed by an app that is failing to correctly load it, or is re-interpreting at load. The file itself is either good or it is broken. Broken files don't demonstrate 'grain' they either show large blocks of ...


3

It is generally recommended to publish photos on the web in sRGB colour space. You have used the correct export setting. Ideally you calibrate and profile your computer monitor. But this is a huge topic if you want to know all the details. It will be worth the effort if you earn money with photography or are doing prints and need soft-proofing. The use of ...


3

The publish tool is a way to link 'Exported' JPEG images to the lightroom original files. It's very useful for batch exporting where you may adjust lots of images in one go. The benefit with publishing to hard-drive is that if you suddenly decide you want to adjust the white balance across all the images in a set you can do so in lightroom, click re-publish ...


3

Correction: With the last release of LR (June 2020) there is a "Camera Preset" develop preset, which is a camera matching color profile; and in some cases it will pick up some basic/detail adjustments as well (e.g. saturation/sharpening). With my Nikon's, all it does is change the color profile to "Camera Neutral" and all other settings ...


3

There are multiple ways to do this, it depends on the type of photos (JPEG or RAW) and the desire to automate. Plugin This shareware plugin seems to do what you want. When exporting your images, it assigns Mac OSX Finder labels that match the colour tags in Lightroom. I haven't tried this myself, but the screenshots seem promising. Manually convert LR tag to ...


2

In Adobe Photoshop, you can use this plugin from Exchange: https://exchange.adobe.com/creativecloud.details.103952.portraitcrop-automated-crop-with-face-detection.html or: https://rezzomedia.com/portraitCrop


2

There is a readme.txt at both C:\ProgramData\Adobe\CameraRaw\LensProfiles\1.0\ThirdParty and C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Lightroom Classic\Resources\LensProfiles\1.0\ThirdParty that reads Install third-party (non-Adobe) lens profiles here. By default, .lcp files are saved to C:\Users\your-user-name\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\CameraRaw\LensProfiles\1.0 I left ...


2

While this could be a Lightroom Classic bug, there is a way to "fix" it. In the Develop Module, go to Lens Corrections, change the lens profile to Adobe (Canon EF 17-40mm f/4 L USM), then select Save New lens profile defaults from the Setup combobox located below the Enable Profile Corrections checkbox. Newly imported photos taken with that lens should now ...


2

So is the solution to export all my files to another directory and then copy them back and run Sychronize Folders so Lightroom flushes the database changes for a given photo? Sooooo... you could. But the thing is: Lightroom is an opinionated program. It expects to manage your files and it expects to work in its non-destructive paradigm. It's certainly ...


2

You can set in Edit->Preferences->External Editing both to be PSD as it is on the image below. and then try to edit as Smart Object. You may need to restart LR in this case.


2

You can't In order to apply any modifications to a JPG file, it needs to be fully decoded into plain image data first(1) - in memory the data is much bigger, as it's necessary to store all RGB-Bytes directly. If you save the modified image it's just like doing a completely new JPG compression on the data. This will cause additional artifacts. Since this new ...


2

Seems I found the solution faster than expected, here are the steps: Virtually switched monitor [3] and [2] in Display Settings. Switched Lightroom's preview window to "windowed" mode. That way it was still displayed on wrong monitor, but a corner of the windows was stretching out from monitor [3] to monitor [2] which I could grab. Moved preview window to ...


2

You can create smart preview for the photos. And work on both platform with those previews. When it come time to export them you should do it from the platform you import the photos. Or update the library for particular OS.


2

Mac and PC use different file path naming schemes, so paths stored into the catalog from the Mac will be meaningless on the PC. A possible workaround could be (untested) to use UNC (aka. network) paths. If you create a share on the photo location (eg. D:\photos) you can access them via \\localhost\photoshare. This should work the same on both systems. You ...


2

Based on my experience with different software products this message "reading preferences" is (kind of) misleading. And this is because it display the previous operation done by Lightroom. Big load time is probably from the size of your catalog. Especially if you have a lot of photos inside and/or you did a lot of edit on photos. You can check this page ...


2

It's quite common for images that are entirely in gamut to soft proof and print differently between Relative and Perceptual Colorimetric. Relative Colorimetric Intent is well defined for all in-gamut colors by the ICC. However, Perceptual Intent for printer profiles is not. It's up to the creator of the profiling software. Colors that are in gamut and ...


2

I found the solution which worked for me. This Adobe help article explains the steps, which are as follows (added in case the link goes down): After backing up your catalog, relaunch Lightroom. Connect the hard drive (MyBook) that is repeating twice. Note: In this article, the labels—MyBook, Temp, Fred, and Mary—have been used as representative names to ...


2

If you're talking about how long it will take your machine to open and display an interpretation of the information in the raw file it's most likely fairly negligible. Of course it would depend on many variables: Image size in terms of numbers of photosites (you don't really have "pixels" until after demosaicing). A 9000 x 6000 pixel image will ...


2

Not sure if this is an option you have already tried or not, but this might help speed things up for you. In the Library module, choose the "Attribute" filter option from the filter bar across the top, and you can choose the "unedited photo" filter ... that will then show all the unedited photos in that folder. Once you've got them all ...


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