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4

The ISO equivalent, you see on digital cameras, is ruled by the chip actual pixel size, chip sensitivity and amplification. Pixel size: The larger the pixel is, the more light it can capture at time. It also averages the noise over the pixel area. Chip sensitivity: The more charge it can gain from a photon, the more sensitive it is and can handle low-light ...


1

As another answer said, I think it's entirely up to you and what you want to achieve. In particular if you want to make night scenes look like daylight or something approximating it, then you are going to need very high ISOs and either live with the noise or have a fairly expensive camera. But if you want to make night scenes look like, well, night you ...


0

In night if you will use high ISO it will not capture perfect picture that can be taken on phone. You should keep it to 100 or less and increase shutter speed and hold the phone still or use tripod.


7

This is up to you, if it works, it works... Unless it does not work. This depends on the subject, on the situation, on if you turn on an additional light or not; if you are using candles or the bat-signal to illuminate your night scene. You could use a flash or not, you could need high speed for action, or you can create artistic looks with motion. You ...


2

Of course, depends on the specific model but let me summarize. The power output is much dimmer than those intended for photography. They are meant to be viewed directly. You are viewing the light source itself. CRI is not important for them. Of course, you need to define if it is important to you. Some side points are that you need to improvise a way to ...


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