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Overhead lighting is flattering. Mankind has experienced light from above since the beginning. Lowered light is unnatural. Watch old horror movies; they create the illusion of dreadfulness using low lights. Overhead lights create shadows that must be mitigated. This type (direction) of light simulates afternoon sun. When doing portraiture we mitigate by ...


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I'm afraid the answer is not very profound. The actual technical term for overhead lighting is "overhead lighting." In addition, it is always advisable to specify the type or kind, which you have. Consider taking up photography since you already have some lighting experience. :^)


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I use the graduated nd filter in the Color Efex pro 4.0 plugin. It is easy to adjust. When you save the image, the setting will be retained in lightroom or PS's filter memory until you change it again. So, just apply it to every frame.


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Lightroom is a tool for graphical interaction with images rather than batch processing. For your use case Imagemagick looks better suited. There is also a tutorial for this: http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/compose/#divide


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Because... Let us take a look at this light setup. A lateral light, where we can clearly see that side A has more light than side B. So if we want an average see how under he chin is at the middle of the two zones. The chin is actually part of the face. The face is on the bottom half of the head. You could put the light meter on the top of the head, but ...


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I've wrestled with this since I bought my new light meter and it didn't seem to function right. I asked the dealer and he said "under the chin." That worked, but it took me a while to figure out why. Here's my take: since a meter isn't really required for ambient light shots, the main purpose (other than studio) is to determine flash power for fill flash. ...


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Your instincts seem pretty good already. I don't know about "best", which is subjective, but your basic options are one or more of: Make the incoming light less intense and/or more diffuse. E.g.: Use a scrim as mentioned in the comment above. Film in existing or created partial shade. E.g. in a barn with open doors, under a tree, etc. (Though you ruled out ...


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