19

While both shots were taken in daylight, the left shot was lit directly by sunlight, whereas the right shot looks like it was under shade. The direct lighting produces hard shadow lines, and more contrast between sunlit and shaded parts of the subject. Also, the brown and dark tones in the clothes and ground in the right image seem to complement the model's ...


6

It's the lighting, and possibly the size of the sensor being used. The image on the left looks like there's only exising ambient light being used. Sunlight is hard, and gives distinct shadows, and can wash out colors to a certain extent. It's not particularly flattering. The image on the right is shot in the shade, but the model is also probably being lit ...


5

I would suggest "Don't". Seriously, if the concern is extraction, it becomes much easier if you're free to select your background color. Shoot with an appropriately contrasting background and extract from the colored background. After extraction, the image can be overlayed on any background including white if that's what's required. Additionally by ...


5

First posted as a comment It looks very much like a lightweight hiking chair I own. Is there not sufficient give in it to lift one of the outer 'pockets' away from the rod? Each one should get easier after the first. I found the manual - apparently it's the other way round, get the rod out of the socket in the centre first, before releasing from the pocket. ...


4

Do not use a light box or soft box to shoot Holographic or Iridescent nail polishes . I take nail shots myself for IG . Sunlight is the best light to shoot Holo in , as well as direct light . A diffuser will kill the holo, making it grey out .


4

Let me try to understand: wsnt to being taking product photos of my work to put on etsy and possibly my own website at some point. Is the lens faulty? Is it not focusing? Is the camera not working? I don't know if the stock lens is good enough as the results have been soso. So: I am assuming that you are actually capable of taking photos, but you do not ...


3

I've got 3 solutions to this: First option (what I should have done): Do not build the softbox in the first place. Sell it online to some poor unsuspecting bugger and put the money towards a decent softbox. Second solution: if you've already made it up, and it's useful to you, don't dismantle it. It's highly likely it will get damaged and become useless. ...


3

There is no mistake. I believe the shape is a compromise between flexibility and simplicity. Having the triangles on only 2 sides gives your a good balance of options, how you can shape the light. Also, please have in mind that barndoors were used on flood lights that could get rather hot. Manipulating these while the lights were running was not a nice thing,...


3

pre focus on a distant city light, or the Moon if out.


3

Eliminate the sun as a light source or over power it. I.E. remove the sun from the equation. (Your set up would work beautifully if you were shooting still photos but you are shooting video and your light source is changing "throughout it's timeline".) Based on your photos it appears that you are using the ambient sun light as part of your light ...


3

"I'd like to introduce myself into photography" - Photography, meet Jay Jay. Jay Jay, meet photography. Question: What exactly do I need to do to recreate that light effect? There is an expression in English that says. "You are putting the cart before the horse". (The horse must pull the cart, not the other way around.) Meaning You ...


3

It depends on what you call "macro photography". Living subjects at this size move fast and you need to stop down a lot for sufficient depth of field. Here is an example shot I made today: You see that Depth of field is a real problem (this is the smallest aperture this camera with crop factor 1.67 has: F16). There is significant motion blur. This has ...


3

The colors along the color temperature axis were "chosen" because they are the colors black bodies radiate as they increase in temperature. This includes everything from heated metals to the surfaces of stars, including our Sun. Almost all of the strong light sources found in nature emit light somewhere along or very close to the color temperature ...


3

If you are only going to shoot a couple of products then shoot it on any neutral background and send it to an external masking service. They are really cheap, quick and the result is perfect. bright-river.com is just one of dozens of services. If you refuse to pay anyone else for masking, or refuse to do the masking your self, you must face the fact that you ...


3

The most general term I can find that has reliable returns from google image search is "high contrast monochrome photography" Some of the key stylistic points appear to be a strong use of broad areas of both full black and full white, but at the same time being a more balanced approach than High Key Or Low Key monochrome. However, there is a clear lean ...


3

There is a simple remedy. Manfrotto sells some cheap cable clips which have one end that can be used to re-tighten these screws as it is narrow enough to fit into the recessed housing of the nut. You can see the tool part on the left side of the image. I use these clips to maintain tension on the lever locks and always have one clipped to the light stand, ...


3

With enough space to put a white backdrop behind the plants, it's jut a case of lighting the backdrop brighter than the plant so that the white backdrop blows out before the plant does. The more space you can include between the plant and the backdrop the easier this will be. Use a flash inside a large modifier placed slightly above the camera to light the ...


3

The "classic" answer is a ring flash or macro flash. Canon sells the Canon MR-14EX II Macro Ring Lite: and the Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite: The latter is a newer unit that can also control Canon RT flashes (and third party RT clones) via wireless radio. Do note that the two heads included with the MT-26X RT can detach from the central ...


3

Well, the low-contrast look can be improved by postprocessing, trying to increase contrast for the broad structures while mostly keeping the washed-out background. Try using a raw processor (those tend to offer a lot of enhancement options while not amplifying premature JPEG conversion noise/artifacts). I've massaged the output a bit in RawTherapee, using ...


3

I am also not entirely sure what you are referring to as "the quality", but as you say you are new to photography, I suspect you might not mean any technical details, but the overall "professional" feel - the right one might have come from a issue of Vogue, the left one probably wouldn't get placed there. I would say that the major ...


2

My dad would take photos of equipment (Military electronics, mechanics, tech-guts for the lack of a better term) They didn't always have a black background, but then the background was usually part of the machine. I do not remember the name of the two types of film he used, but one was an infrared film. He said he got the best contrast from it, but depended ...


2

As Tetsujin commented, I'm pretty sure it would be called "Noir." There's also a filter on the camera app on iPhones with that name. I attached a screenshot of that below.


2

In addition to the Rosco kit you mentioned it might also be worth taking a look at LEE filters. They offer a visual comparison of their diffusion materials. There is also a quite useful comparison of different bounce and diffusion materials by Matt Porwoll. While these demonstrations are mainly intended for larger-scale photographic and cinematographic use,...


2

Just me, but probably not. LED continuous lighting, particularly if we're talking little panels, tend to have relatively low light output and would be insufficient to match sunlight no matter what camera/lens combination you were using. f/1.4 is nice, but you can buy f/1.4 for MFT, and moreover aperture affects any light source. While it might help brighten ...


2

Since you have a scientific background (I hope?) I'll use mathematics to describe why what you're saying is impossible. A camera only has 3 color filters--red, green, and blue. Obviously those three words are qualitative and not quantitative at all, but what is important that all color is multiplied by the spectral transmission function of those RGB filters ...


2

My question then is this: how should I best go about using an in-picture color palette to "match" colors between photographs? Any workflows I should look into or avoid? What other factors might I not be aware of that I should take into consideration for "scientific" color analysis? You'll probably never get the precision you need for ...


2

One very important difference that hasn't been mentioned yet is when you are shooting animals such as insects or other arthropods. They are light sensitive. If you want to have narrow aperture (for getting good depth of field) and high shutter speed (for freezing movement), you need a whole lot of light. And most animals will not stay in place given a ...


2

A light stand? As an assistant I have used a light stand with it's legs collapsed in order to hold a strobe with a soft box attached over a location that was difficult to set fixed stands in place. It has the necessary stud/spigot for a strobe built on to it. In fact having the legs on it but collapsed help to keep the pole from rotating due to the weight ...


2

Relative size (distance) is often correlated with diffusion/softness, as if the only thing you have to worry about/change is the distance of the light/modifier... which is wrong because distance significantly impacts the light output requirement, the resulting light falloff, and significant characteristics of the resulting image. Using modifiers/diffusion ...


2

Stars are at an infinite distance. Failing to find a brighter similarily distant object (like a far tower with a light on it, or the Moon for instance), you can set your lens to infinity and hope that it works. In reality you likely will have to use a setting slightly less than the absolut maximum focus distance (how exact depends on your lens / camera ...


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