19

While both shots were taken in daylight, the left shot was lit directly by sunlight, whereas the right shot looks like it was under shade. The direct lighting produces hard shadow lines, and more contrast between sunlit and shaded parts of the subject. Also, the brown and dark tones in the clothes and ground in the right image seem to complement the model's ...


6

It's the lighting, and possibly the size of the sensor being used. The image on the left looks like there's only exising ambient light being used. Sunlight is hard, and gives distinct shadows, and can wash out colors to a certain extent. It's not particularly flattering. The image on the right is shot in the shade, but the model is also probably being lit ...


4

A light box/tent provides extremely flat lighting; that's the opposite of what you want for showing scratches/textures. I don't know of anyone who does high level product photography that uses one... But to start, use just one light off to the side at more of an angle to show the textures (up to 90*). And place it right against the fabric in order to make it ...


3

I am also not entirely sure what you are referring to as "the quality", but as you say you are new to photography, I suspect you might not mean any technical details, but the overall "professional" feel - the right one might have come from a issue of Vogue, the left one probably wouldn't get placed there. I would say that the major ...


3

Well, the low-contrast look can be improved by postprocessing, trying to increase contrast for the broad structures while mostly keeping the washed-out background. Try using a raw processor (those tend to offer a lot of enhancement options while not amplifying premature JPEG conversion noise/artifacts). I've massaged the output a bit in RawTherapee, using ...


3

You've done a great job for being 'fairly new'. I agree with Steven in the things he said, so experiment with those. Edit: Your focus, depth-of-field choice, composition and exposure are spot-on. Here's what I can see that really stops the shot from being where you want it: There's a green cast. This is probably from the type of lights that come with the ...


2

Several questions on your questions... "A more natural look" First of all. Photography is not just about light, it is also about shadows. On a reflective object, it is not just about reflections of light sources, but also of dark surroundings. As we do not live in a "heaven-like place" with light, and just light all around us, a lightbox ...


2

A light tent is probably the wrong tool, here, but it's what you've got. You're definitely right that it's the lighting. A light tent is made to diffuse and soften the light but the flip side is that soft light doesn't reveal textures very well. With product photography, it's all a game of angles in terms of getting a surface to reveal its texture in a ...


1

The right image has more diffuse and head-on lighting of the subject which is good because the black suit risks having all detail and texture disappear otherwise. The left image looks oddly low-key, by which I mean the upper end of the dynamic range has no content. Even the sun's reflection of the motorcycle's gas tank - which ought to be the brightest point ...


1

There are several things that stand out to my eye: Tone processing on the left. The right looks close to untouched out of camera, and the left hand image appears to have a bit of "HDR" processing look to it. This could be as simple as sliding down the "highlights" and up the "shadows" in something like Lightroom. It's a ...


1

It's the light. Photography is always, first and foremost, about the light before it is about anything else. Always. The largest differences in the two photos are due to the differences in the qualities of light illuminating the subjects. One photo was shot in direct sunlight high in the sky. The other was shot in softer lighting in a shaded area, probably ...


1

I can see multiple differences, some are already covered in other answers. Direct sunlight vs. shade The left image is all bright because of the direct sunlight illuminating the scene. Right image was taken in shade and maybe a softbox was used to smoothly illuminate the scene. Composition The left image compostion has two domains, light brown in bottom ...


1

The 100mm macro lens is great for portraits too. The sun as suggested with appropriate shade and use of a reflector should give some great results if you do branch off. On the macro side you can take longer exposures in available lighting. When photographing moving subjects like insects though be prepared to be out shooting when the air temperature is cool ...


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