38

In a reflective surface, the reflections are of the surrounding area. 1. The bigger the object the bigger space you need So, in your case, you need a really big space clean, let's say painted on white, like a photo studio. Look how humungous and clean a photo studio can be. I think you need about the space to fit two or three cars. A 90° corner could work ...


23

Look at your own shadow. If you can't find your shadow then the light is as soft as it possibly can be. If you have a hard edged shadow then the light is hard. If you can make out your shadow but it's faint or the edges are not defined then you have somewhere in between (which can often give the best results).


17

Two basic techniques for dealing with reflections on glass should be known, albeit they will only reduce, not totally eliminate them - so for formal product photography, the advice about using an all white or black, uncluttered shooting environment still apply. One is using polarizing filters. In the simplest form, you use one on your camera lens - for more ...


10

I use for reference the first half page of hits when I search "product photographs industrial refrigerator"… You'll notice the very first thing you are going to need is a white room, or if budget is limited then some kind of framework from which you can hang white sheets or paper roll, completely surrounding the product. Once you have that, you are then in ...


9

Seems like you're generally overexposing by maybe half to a full stop. You could just use the sunny 16 rule and stop down from what you get. Your results seem consistent enough to pull that off. A better idea would be to buy an external incidence meter, such as the Minolta IVF. They run very cheap (<€100) and will, once you get the hang of it, make sure ...


6

The sunny 16 rule applies in direct sunlight. These images all appear to be shot on an overcast day or in shade. (Which was wise on your part, as this will generally produce much better looking images of flowers) Shooting with the sunny 16 rule in shade/overcast would cause underexposure. I would agree with @xiota that the lab is compensating for any ...


5

The only factor that matters is what you are looking for visually in your shot. Harsh shadows, soft shadows, no shadows, these all can be valid to have in a photo. It depends on what you want it to look like. There is no right or wrong answer. Look at how the light falls on your subject and decide if you like it. Soft shadows tend to have a more serene ...


5

That's fairly obviously a single hard light (no modifier) directly above the optical axis of the lens. The flash could either be a significant distance above the camera or it could be a camera mounted flash bounced off a neutral colored ceiling. It looks to me to be the former, but if it is the latter then a flag (an opaque object used to block light) was ...


5

When artificial lights are used in photography they're commonly diffused such as with a softbox. If the light has to be bounced off something to get it to the right place, the diffusing can be combined with the reflecting. The difference in reflectivity isn't that great - no more than about than a stop, depending on how much of the scattered light is ...


5

With reflective surfaces you do not remove the reflections. Instead, you give it something pleasing to reflect. That's what the white room/walls do... they provide a continuous smooth white reflection/gradient. Curved surfaces are much more difficult because they see/reflect a much larger area/radius.


4

Reduce the power of the background light in relation to the overall image. A Blown up white image in a background should be just barely overexposed. If you are using a histogram on the camera take pictures from darker to lighter untill you just get the overexposure on the white and stop there. If you are using an incident lightmeter overexpose to 1 or 2 ...


4

One "Grain of salt" point to keep in mind: A camera with an unreliable/out of tune shutter will offer headaches. Applying 'correct exposure' to a camera with an incorrect shutter speed or aperture control will not give you the expected results - If you still see errors in future photos after applying better exposure methods, then explore gear issues. [And ...


4

I'm going to take an oblique approach to answer what I infer to be the implied question, "how does my company get good product shots of large appliances with large glass doors?". When you say, the company is ok with having the equipment needed to get rid of the reflections, I assume that you are the person who is taking the product photos, and have a ...


3

The simplest way to do what you want it to make HDR. Bracket several exposures with +-1 or +-2 stops then use software to combine in single image with light and dark areas exposed closest to your vision. In such very high contrast scenes this can help a lot. Of course you can try with single RAW file and try to compress high contrast to acceptable level. ...


3

First of all you need to understand the concept of "dynamic range". (Maybe you do, I don't know) The dr is the ability of your camera to render as much darktones and highlights at the same time. Have a look about this concept on youtube. You have to be aware that the human eye has the hability to render a better DR than most of digital cameras. On average, ...


3

Lighting for shots such as this one is not about absolute lighting levels, it is about lighting ratios. The 'dark' parts of the picture don't need to be in absolute darkness. They just need to be less bright than the bright parts of the scene by enough to make them dark by controlling exposure. As long as the side you want illuminated is lit brightly enough ...


3

Take a look at this post, It will probably solve most of your doubts: https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/96192/what-are-the-mechanics-of-bounce-light-how-does-it-work/96248#96248 I've always wondered why, when light bounces into an object and illuminates its dark side A normal object, like a vase, does not bounce light into its own dark ...


3

The foil reflector gives a more soft and diffused light.


3

Useful light is the area directly illuminated by the light source. Spill light is the area lit indirectly by the light source. At least that is the terminology I've always used. You can probably find at least a few other names to call them here: http://lowel.tiffen.com/edu/glossary/


3

Matt Grum's answer is the golden ticket answer. That rule of thumb method will work most of the time, but eyes work differently to photographs, and sometimes our eyes adapt to the light and we can't make out the shadows as definitely as they would be represented in a photograph. Here are a couple more tangible approaches that I use. For digital photography ...


3

Petapixel has a great Demo of focal length (the Hitchcock Zoom), using 20mm and getting closer will make you skinny: Try a video and alter your 'hip angle', direction you are looking and distance from camera (framing); this will quickly allow you to find a frame where you feel you look your best (which has a small effect in others perception). In the first ...


2

The best example of Rembrandt is on the dummy head. What is referred to as Rembrandt is the style of lighting which often appears on subjects painted by Rembrandt the famous artist. It was one of his "trademarks". The triangle patch of light in Rembrandt will be on the side of the face most prominent to camera. When the reverse is the case, this is ...


2

Harsh light is more directional while soft light is more diffuse. In most cases this means that with a harsh light source you will experience a more contrasty scene than with soft light. So you may want to be very careful about correctly capturing highlights and shadows when shooting in harsh light. For most hi-end digital cameras underexposing is a safe bet....


2

I would say rethink using flash. If the reason it's discouraged is green-eye and that deer-in-the-headlights look, it's simply a matter of learning to use flash correctly, whether that's bouncing an on-camera flash, or taking the flash off-camera. Just my opinion, but I think your concerns about the power/light output from low cost continuous lights is a ...


2

I agree with Alaska Man's solution and would comment there but I want to add considerable detail that won't fit in a comment. To do what he's suggested, get a subject to stand in the bright sunlight. Choose 2 of the following values - ISO, shutter speed, aperture - based on your needs. In this case I would suggest choosing shutter speed and aperture - you ...


2

No. Do not try to illuminate the room using a flash. The way you are taking photos is not bad at all, it probably needs some white balance. The only thing you can do is either get a better performing camera in dark situations or to reduce the noise using software like "Neat image". Another two programs I think make a good job removing noise are Dxo and ...


2

Chris already mentioned the softbox, and indeed photographic reflectors work similarly. If you would use a strobe flash without a softbox (or brolly) you'd have a point-like light source which gives hard light and ditto shadows. A softbox acts as a secondary light source, i.e. it captures the hard light from the flash, and diffuses it over a larger surface. ...


2

Lot's of great answers already here on exposure, so simply going to add: play to the strengths of your film. You're using color negative film, no? All color negs handle underexposure...like absolute garbage...but tolerate overexposure very, very well. Up to 3 or 4 stops even! (https://petapixel.com/2018/02/05/test-reveals-exposure-limits-kodak-portra-400-...


1

Outside, the street is evenly illuminated by the light coming from the sun, but once that lights goes through your window it behaves as any other light point, and its intensity falls proportionally to the traversed distance. If we see the scene evenly lighted is because our eyes are fastly adapting to the brightness inside and outside the window, which our ...


1

Some tips on lighting for portraiture: Years ago, I taught Color Print and Process at the Professional Photographers School for Continuing Education (Winona). The great portrait masters taught there too, and sometimes I would monitor and act as a Grip. Some rubbed off so here goes: Our media is for the most part 2 dimensional reproductions of 3 ...


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