17

That is an incident light meter. It's used in both motion and still photography, although with modern cameras the built-in light meter is usually so good (and so convenient) that separate meters are not as essential as they once were. There is a difference, though, because a camera's built-in meter measures light reflected back to the camera, whereas this ...


13

In theory, this should work perfectly. The combination of (shutter speed, aperture, ISO) determines the amount of light which falls on the sensor (per unit area), so should be transferable between devices. In practice, there are a couple of things which mean it might not quite work: If you're doing long exposures with film, reciprocity failure means that ...


11

You do get less light as you move further from a object. However, that less light is focused on a smaller area. It so happens that the two effects cancel out, and the focused image of a object will be the same brightness as distance is changed, assuming the f-stop is held the same. For example, moving twice as far away means the lens intercepts ¼ ...


8

Light meter and exposure meter are interchangeable terms for the same instrument. We can use them two ways. A reflection reading is taken by pointing the meter at the subject. We are measuring the amount of light energy that is reflected from the subject -- it has already hit and is being reflected. We can also measure the light before it hits the subject. ...


6

When we talk about flash photography; this is because the shutter speed does not contribute to the exposure from the flash. A flash will output a burst which last maybe 1/1000s, so changing the shutter speed won't affect the exposure from the flash but form the other continuous light sources. And since the light meter used in the first video you linked ...


6

Lightmeters are superior to in camera metering because they are able to measure the incident light, not just the light reflected off the subject. Reflected light metering is less accurate as the camera/meter has no way of telling the difference between a white cat that is massively underexposed and a black cat that is correctly exposed. With incident ...


6

A spot meter is handy to be able to read the reflectivity of an object in the scene precisely from a distance. It is like putting a telephoto lens on a meter to isolate one part of the subject. An alternate method is to walk over to the subject and read the reflectivity close-up. Without a spot meter, you would take a reading of the average light ...


5

You've only got the three variables to work with -- ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. When shooting in a studio environment, shutter speed doesn't really matter because you're relying upon the lights and their limitations, so you often need to work at 1/60 sec. You input your desired ISO into the light meter, and take a reading. The only variable left is the ...


5

Most calibration is done by comparing a device under test to one that's known good or by using a calibrated reference source. Many metrology labs offer this as a service, usually in ways that can be traced back to NIST or another standards organization. The cost will be many times the value of your Weston meter. The zero point adjustment on your meter ...


5

No, the light meter reading (for example, ISO 100, f/11, 1/200 second) already applies to any camera, any sensor size, any crop factor. That''s the beauty of the "f/stop" numbering system. Crop factor might apply to focal length and sensor size situations, but Not to exposure.


5

Since you do not have the appropriate test equipment, the best test will be to shoot a few test rolls and examine the outcome. That being said: Seek out a local minilab photofinisher; they should have an instrument called a densitometer. This is a device that passes a beam of light through developed photographic film and assigns a numerical value to the ...


4

When using regulable flashes or countinuous lamps, the lightmeter does not tell the photographer what aperture to use, instead it tells which aperture the current lighting is set up for. The photographer first decides what aperture to use, a suitable ISO and exposure time. The meter is then used to find a flash or lamp setting that is good for the aperture ...


4

If you are using your flashes in full auto TTL, then there is no point in having a LightMeter, however, if you wish to have better control and more accurate tone, colour, brightness, contrast, shadows and highlights, then manual is the way to go and the Sekonic Lightmeter is a great tool to have. Apologies if I happen to go over anything too basic with my ...


4

Even in theory there are differences in the way digital sensors and films record light that makes ISO values only approximate. But these differences are usually fairly subtle and theoretically exposure should be more or less equal if you use the same ISO, aperture, and shutter time. For more about this, please see: Why are these film photos brighter than ...


4

Those talking about the 'angle' refer to the angle of view of light meters. A standard reflective light meter has a fairly large angle of view, and thus meters for a large area in your scene. Spot meters have a very narrow angle of view. You've likely seen mentions of 1-degree spot meters. This means that such a spot meter meters for 1 degree in your entire ...


4

You basically have the right idea in your first bullet. The simple approach is to meter and set your exposure for the foreground. Then meter the sky (not the sun), and pick a ND grad filter strength that is the difference of the two meter readings (or slightly less, to within a stop if you can). Depending on your scene, you might need to adjust your ...


3

The subscripted number is showing the measured value in ¹⁄₁₀ -stop increments above displayed F-number. So for instance, in the manual when it shows 5.67, it is telling you that it measured ⁷⁄₁₀ stop above f/5.6, which comes out to approximately f/7.1 (5.6 * (√2).7 ≈ 7.14). See also: How do I read the shutter speed from my light meter? "Sekonic L-758DR ...


3

Yes, a flashmeter only gives aperture. The shutter speed on the camera merely has to be long enough to ensure the film or sensor are uncovered for the duration of the flash (1/50 sec for a Leica M3, 1/250 for modern SLRs and up to 1/500 for a leaf shutter) and doesn't affect the exposure, assuming ambient light is insignificant compared to the flash output, ...


3

Putting the lightmeter under the chin makes sense to me because: a) It is incident light what's being measured, and the little sphere is to be located as close as posible to the surface being iluminated (i.e. the face's skin). Putting the lightmeter at the same distance from the light source is crucial as light intensity varies with distance to the source. ...


3

Excellent question, this is up there with 'How to select a tripod?', and just like with that question, if in the long run you actually use the light meter, you're going to wind up upgrading/sidegrading several times to find exactly what you want :) tl;dr: If you're metering large scenes such that you can't stand next to the entirety of your subject, you ...


3

The subscripted "8" indicates that the measured exposure is ⁸⁄₁₀ stop higher shutter speed (that is, faster, or shorter duration) beyond ⅛ second. ⁸⁄₁₀ stop equates to a multiplier of approximately 1.74, so 8 * 1.74 ≈ 14, so the actual metered shutter speed should be just under ¹⁄₁₄ seconds. You can visually see this on the scale at the bottom of the meter'...


3

The answer is linked right there http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Selenium_meter from your link: the light meter works with a photoelectric cell. The brighter it is, the more energy it produces. Evidently, it is sensitive enough to work in closed rooms.


3

That's a very nice feature, in that if you find a particular mix of fill flash that you think looks natural, you can recreate it any time. But you'll have to use trial and error to get the ratio you're looking for, the meter won't let you set it as a target. If the ratio is higher than you want, you could lower the shutter speed a few stops to let in more ...


3

Incident Light Meters measure light that is directly hitting the subject as opposed to the on board Camera Metering which is measuring the reflected light. This generally means, light has to be fairly stable or controlled to retain correct exposure long enough when using an incident Light Meter. A good example of using an incident light meter outside in ...


3

In digital photography, the most issues come from the dark portions of the image where sensor noise has the most impact on the quality of the result. Electronic sensors accumulate light, but while they are collecting light, they also collect random noise. To avoid this noise being an issue, a technique known as ETTR or exposure to the right is even used ...


3

The exposure is based on the amount of light hitting the subject intertwined with how much light is reflected from the subject. Thus the exposure remains a constant regardless of camera to subject distance. While this might seem to violate the fact that light falls off with distances, it doesn’t because this is a special case. Light falloff with distance is ...


3

A quick check is that in bright sun, a light meter should normally indicate near EV 15 at ISO 100. This is approximately f/16 at 1/125, or Sunny 16 would say f/16 at 1/100 second (ISO 100). Or equivalent exposures of course, f/11 at 1/250 or 1/200 second, or f/8 at 1/500 or 1/400 second, etc. Not precisely EV 15, bright sun could often at times be a bit ...


3

The light meter that's in your camera is an reflective meter. Reflective meters measure the light that is reflected off of the subject, and determine the exposure based on that reading. Standalone incident meters, like the Sekonic models, instead measure the light that falls onto your subject. There are multiple reasons for choosing one over the other: ...


3

Your ideas may be useful for practice, but consider these points on the basis of the particular film camera you will be using: Does it have built-in metering? That is not uncommon. Does it have autofocus? That is less common, but possible. Will you be shooting color, monochrome (B/W)or a combination? Negative or slides? B/W has the greatest exposure ...


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