9

I think you really need more light. Don't be afraid to pump up the wattage there, you can use shutter speed and aperture to effect the exposure. My setup is fairly similar: But the lights on the side are very bright and the softbox on top is even more so (it's a Westcott cheapie continuous light). That light is bright enough to really take the shadows down ...


7

Getting a white background (or black background, or just about any other background effect) is about lighting the background and the subject separately. So my advice is: Dump the lightbox - it simply isn't a good fit for white background photography (too small and doesn't let you light the background). Get a cheap flash like the YN-460 (about $40) + some ...


5

I'm not sure if there is actually enough light coming from those lights to really get things across. Aside from possibly needing brighter lights, you are also getting highlights on the plastic off of the spots where the light isn't diffused enough and it is reflecting in to the camera. Try playing with the angle of the lights and possibly moving them such ...


5

5400 is a reference to the temperature, not the amount of light. In general continuous lighting will not be as powerful as strobe lighting will be. You still need not only more light, but an additional light on the back of the box to raise the exposure of the background in relation to the product so that you can intentionally blow the white background ...


4

It's not trivial to calculate from scratch the amount of light required (as you have no idea how much is absorbed, reflected etc. and it will vary according to how the lights are positioned). What you can do, is find out what shutter speed your camera meter is suggesting currently and work it out from there. You'll want to aim for 1/2f where f is the focal ...


4

You've got a couple of problems here. The highlights on the product are already blown out in places, yet the background isn't white at all, but more of a light grey color. If you want a lighter (whiter) background your going to have to put more light on the background and less directly on the product. Then when you take the picture expose for the product, ...


2

Here are some things that will lend professionalism to your images. The images are high-quality. The focus is optimal. The noise is minimal. The contrast is optimal with pure neutral highlights and no overall colour cast. The exposure is perfect*. You are shooting a portrait of the product, in effect. You want the subject to look attractive. The subject ...


2

Your images both look underexposed. If you want to blow out the background with the setup you have, I'd start with the first setup, with lights on either side, and block the front half of each side of the lightbox so that most of the light coming through is in the back half so the background is lit more than the product. To light the product you may need ...


2

I would vote for the softbox in that instance. The softbox is an enclosed reflector, so there is very little stray light spill, and we assume all of the light goes forward to the aim point (it can't go anywhere else). But stop and just look at a CFL lamp in an umbrella first. Of course most of the CFL light will go out sideways from the bulb, totally ...


1

The darker area under the figurines are reflections, not shadows. They are expected to have color similar to that of the figurines. Using a phone as the backlight, here is an image that demonstrates similar reflections. In addition to having similar coloration, the lettering is reversed. Some options to consider: Leave them as they are. Those who realize ...


1

"but the angle required to get a perfect reflection makes it impossible to take a picture where the entire pin is within focus." This sounds more like a lens choice problem, that you do not have a lens that stops down enough or has the right focal length. I would start by measuring the depth of the lapel pin (at an angle) and use a DoF calculator to find ...


1

You can use a 'shift' lens (perspective control) or bellows to tilt or shift your lens. Lens can be expensive, but you can find adapters such as a 'lens baby' to attach a normal lens. also, Alan's answer (above) will help with lighting the subject.


1

Make a tent using white bedsheet or better white fiberglass curtain material. Fiberglass is fireproof if using hot lights. The object is placed inside the tent and lit from outside. The ideal is the white tent serves to totally diffuse the light so that from the object’s perspective the light is unidirectional. You can use white translucent sheets of plastic ...


1

You may find useful this wikipedia page You can calculate the exposure value with the given formula: EV = log2(N^2 / t) setting: N = the f-number (aperture) you will use t = the exposure time you will use they both depends on your camera: search a middle aperture for your lens and a time you will likely use (a rule of thumb is that the slower time ...


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