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Here's an image that may help people to visualise why many lens hoods are petal-shaped.


31

Your camera is almost certainly applying lens correction for geometric distortion to the JPEG images. This results in the edges of the widest angle images being cropped slightly to correct the barrel distortion most zoom lenses demonstrate at the wide end. The 8.8-175mm (24-480mm FF equivalent) wide focal length ratio zoom lens of your Panasonic FZ2000 ...


14

The hood protects the lens of physical impact from knock and obstacles. It also reduces flare and keeps image quality to what the lens is capable of. A UV filter protects against flying dangers such as sand, salt and other elements. While doing so a UV filter is detrimental to image quality as it adds additional reflections from another glass element in the ...


14

Flare in an optical system results when stray light (non-image forming) comingles with the image-forming light rays. A lens hood diminishes the ill effects of flare by shielding the lens from unwanted peripheral light rays. Every picture will benefit if a lens hood is mounted. This is because stray light enters the lens barrel, and is reflected off the ...


11

Unless the lens hood is in the way (for example if you are using a polarising filer that you need to access, or when putting the camera in a camera bag), there is no reason to remove it. On the contrary, it does offer some protection for the front lens element, so leave it on as long as you can. Unlike for example an UV filter, it doesn't introduce any more ...


11

Most of the difference is explained at Why are some lens hoods petal shaped and others not?, with the remaining question being the cost. And, I don't think the basic cost premise is correct. See cheap tulip hoods at B&H, where they start at $4 -- a dollar less than the cheapest circular hood. So the answer to "why are tulip hoods more expensive?" is... "...


11

A filter offers more protection than a hood alone. I have had a filter save a lens from certain severe damage when a lens hood failed to do so. How much UV filters affects image quality is a much debated subject. I have added a comment on this at the end - mainly pointing to some objective measurements. Here are the test results for the best UV filter in ...


11

The ES-52 works a little differently than most lens hoods we are accustomed to seeing. Instead of blocking off-axis light by extending a cylinder or cone perpendicular to the image plane and centered around the optical axis, The ES-52 blocks extraneous light by placing a smaller circular opening parallel to the image plane. Due to the difference in design, ...


10

The supplied or purposely built hood is the safest to use on a lens. While you can easily find a hood that fits the lens, getting one which works as well is a matter of luck. Even it a hood fits, it can still cause vignetting. I learned the hard way since two of my hoods have the same size :( If you do not accidentally get one which a too narrow field of ...


10

Why do videographers have rectangular lens hoods available? Primarily because videographers frequently mount rectangular filters such as NDs and ND grads, and for the ability to use flags or barn doors to more finely control light blocking. Light control is more important in videography than in photography, because one exposure control variable, shutter ...


9

Every time I accidentally bump my lens hood into a wall, my leg, a sign, or another person I am reminded of why I have a hood on my lens all of the time, even when there's not an obvious flare situation.


9

There are a few zoom lenses that effectively do what you envision, but it is not due to movements of the hood. Rather, it is due to a retrofocus design that extends the lens barrel fully at the widest focal length and retracts the lens barrel fully at the longest focal length. The hood, rather than being attached to the front barrel that extends and retracts,...


7

Update (10/2017): Since the answer below was written I have used a 3rd party hood bought through amazon that, although made of black plastic, had a shiny, reflective finish. If there were strong light sources in the actual field of view, it actually made flare worse than using no hood at all. The light was reflecting off the inner surface of the hood and ...


7

A fixed universal lens hood would not work. The hood is designed to block light that is just out of shot. Such light can't contribute to the image in any way but can bounce around inside the lens and cause flare. What is "just out of shot" depends entirely on how wide your lens is. Light that is just out of shot for a 300mm image will be mid frame in an ...


7

Some lens hoods are an equal size, all the way round (such as for telephoto lenses) whereas others (for medium to wide lenses) protrude more at the top and bottom than they are wide, so I think the answer to your question is NO. There is no single lens hood that will fit all your lenses. The one for 18mm would not be suitable for 300mm. That said, if cost ...


7

As you know, distant mountains are most often veiled by a bluish haze. This is a vapor cloud that often spoils the beauty of the vista. The same is seen when we fly; the clarity of our aerial image is tainted by the same phenomenon. What is happening is: The UV and violet light has the shortest wave lengths of the light spectrum. They can and do skip past ...


6

You need a round one because the front element will rotate when it zooms/focuses.


6

Nope. No difference if they are the same shape. You MIGHT (and i stress might because its never happened to me) have problems with it staying in place if the tolerances for the plastic aren't right. But as I've said, its never happened to me. If you're looking for budget hoods, have you considered printing your own?


6

The other answers are correct: for this lens, the hood attaches to a bayonet on the outside of the lens, and the filter threads are still clear so that screw-in filters can still be added. It should be noted, however that this isn't universally true: screw-in hoods are available, and for some lenses this is/was the OEM solution. Also, some filter options -- ...


6

If the bag is subject to enough force to damage the hood, then I'd be worried for the lens/camera. There should be no problem leaving the hood on, however it can take up a lot more space. For this reason most hoods can be reversed for storage. If they can't be reversed, I often take the hood off and place it loose around the lens for extra protection.


6

No. There are several (probable) reasons why they don't exist Unneeded complexity. Pros using zooms (such as the 14–24 mm, 24–70 mm, and 70–200 mm ƒ/2.8 trinity) are moving and shooting fast. The last thing they want is to ruin a shot when they zoom out to the lens's widest angle, but forget to tweak the hood's angle, and get vignetted/cropped images. ...


6

Without having more information on how exactly you took your image, and without the possibility to reproduce this effect, one can only guess. I see three possible causes for a sun reflection that is visible in the view finder, but does not appear in the image that is taken by the image sensor: Automatic aperture control Possibly you took your picture with ...


5

The lens hood should be kept on and point away from the lens at all times. It keeps unwanted light from entering the lens which often causes flare and it protects the front element from accidental knocks. There is no downside to having the lens hood on the right way, except for added bulk. Most people unfortunately use their lens hood in decoration ...


5

There are lens filter wrenches available, such as these, but I find a rubber band works just as well, and always carry a few in my gadget bag. They're also handy for holding a remote shutter release cord or to keep batteries together. BTW, don't leave a rubber band on the filter, as the rubber outgasses and also may liquefy with age.


4

In general hoods are not interchangeable, the mounting mechanism is more complex than a screw thread. There are probably examples of hoods that can be shared but this is the exception rather than the rule. You can buy generic rubber hoods which are designed to fit on most lenses. The same is true of tripod collars, unless you're lucky. There is a large ...


4

You can and should use it always. There is no disadvantage in principle. However, there are very rare cases, where a lens hood can be "in the way". The lens hood can block a built-in flash, for very wide angles it could even block an extra flash on top of the camera. You would then observe some black shadow at the bottom of the image. When doing macros ...


4

Most lenses from the major manufacturers have a proprietary connector that the hood uses to attach to the front of the lens. While you can purchase hoods that attach to filter threads, that doesn't guarantee the hood will work properly with a lens it can screw onto. This is because: I read that the focal length plays a role... It's even more involved ...


4

That depends on which lens you have and whether you want the official Canon model or something cheaper. If you have the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM, you want an ET-63 lens hood (or compatible replacement). If you have the EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II, then you want an ET-60 hood (or compatible replacement). For other lens models, look up the lens on Canon's ...


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