15

Every lens I have ever bought had front and back caps with it. If you go to the manufacturer's website for the particular lens you are looking to buy, there is usually a "What's in the box" link, or a section in the specifications that lists the new-in-box package contents. Some manufacturers don't seem to list that information on their sites (for instance, ...


10

No! You want opaque lens caps because: Keep light out of the camera when not using it. In film cameras, the sensor is effectively always on. The shutter should in theory block all light, but stuff happens. With digital sensors, light hitting the sensor when not exposing doesn't corrupt the next picture, but you still want light not entering the lens ...


10

Lens caps are for use on lenses that are in storage. They are not meant to be used on lenses that are in use, such as when attached to a camera. As you have experienced, they are not particularly resilient, they are easily detached in the field, and they are easily misplaced. In the environments you describe, city and museum walks, obsessive use of lens ...


8

When buying new, yes. When buying used, usually, but double check. It's uncommon for a lens to be sold without any caps at all, but not rare for the original ones to be substituted for generic replacements. These are usually (but not always) inferior. That doesn't affect your results, of course, but sometimes off-brand rear caps don't fit tightly and might ...


8

Just to add another suggestion... There are also those "cap keeper" doodads, which solve a problem for some:


7

For the vast majority of lenses, i.e. almost all lenses, a general lens cap would fit, as long as long as it had the right diameter. There are a few exceptions, e.g. ultra wide angle lenses that have a protruding front element, as e.g. in this question where you need a special lens cap compatible with the lens, but those are really special cases.


6

This will cost you a bit more up front, but could save you some in the long run. Out of appreciation to the owner for letting you use their camera, buy a new Nikon 52mm lens cap to replace the one you have worn out.¹ Place that cap on the lens whenever you are returning the camera to its owner. Buy a few cheap generic 52mm lens caps. They can be had for ...


6

If the lens caps weren't compatible, filters also wouldn't be compatible. So yes, the thread specs are the same between lens manufacturers. Only the diameter of the filter mount / lens cap varies.


6

Light is only beneficial for inhibiting the growth of fungi if it contains ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. The primary source of UV light among common light sources encountered most places is sunlight. Even then, if there's a "protective" UV filter screwed onto the front of the lens, it does very little to no good to leave the lens cap off, since the ...


5

Interestingly enough, optics made for hunting rifles often come with transparent lens caps for both the front and rear lenses. This allows the scope to be used, albeit with less optical precision, without taking the time necessary to flip up or remove the covers if game unexpectedly presents itself. The main reason lens and body caps are still black plastic ...


5

Lens caps are opaque to keep light out of the camera. This is something you really want when there's light-sensitive film in it rather than a digital sensor. Most shutters work well, but a tiny leak will result in fogging if light's allowed in over the long term. I'm not sure the fungus angle is valid or not since there are other things that would grow ...


4

Until you find a proper one, I would simply fashion one out of some cardboard and gaffer tape. Or if you happen to find some plastic drain pipe of the correct diameter, you could use that.


4

... my spouse has a (bad) habit of putting her keys next to my lenses and my three year old picked up a new hobby recently. Collecting rocks. Some options to consider: Use step up rings so that you can use the same lens caps with all your lenses. This would prevent you from having any unattached caps to lose. Use neoprene pouches. While they are ...


4

Is there any type of lens cap that will stop itself short of destroying the lens if you accidentally put it on backwards... ? Although some old caps are made of metal and may damage the glass or filter threads if not used carefully, most modern lens caps are made of plastic and will not harm the lens if accidentally put on backwards, unless they have been ...


4

You should be able to get a lens cap from any local camera store, or easily buy one online. For the majority of lenses, the only thing you need to know is the diameter in millimeters of the filter thread. This would be marked with an "ø", i.e. "ø52" would indicate a 52mm filter thread, and then you just need a 52mm lens cap. It doesn't need to be a Canon ...


3

Most lens caps are plastic, front lenses usually are glass. It seems a bit strange that this combination should be able to cause scratches, or at most to the coatings. What information are we missing here?


3

Although it's a good idea, it's not necessary per se. Some climates are more favourable for fungi that will nest in lenses. Especially in very humid climates it would be beneficial to control the air humidity of the room or cabinet lenses are stored in. In other areas of the world, the chances of your glass becoming fungus ridden are much smaller. Would it ...


3

There is a different type of lens cap called "push on". This is possibility, but the one that came with my B&W polarizer doesn't work too well.


3

Whether an image is automatically displayed or not following capture can be turned on or off using the menu on all digital Canon EOS cameras. If you have selected a setting that displays the image, you can also select from several options that determine for how long the review image is displayed. You may have turned it off without realizing what you were ...


2

it would make sense for front/rear lens caps and body caps to be made transparent. I think the main reason is probably that clear plastics like ABS tend to crack and turn yellow with exposure to UV light, whereas black versions are UV resistant. Experience seems to bear this out: I have some lenses from the early 70's that have original caps, and they're ...


2

Lens caps aren't transparent because it would look terrible.


2

You could buy a replacement from UK Digital or Samyang (these seem to be the same product for the same price). If ordering from the UK isn't convenient, you could find someone with a 3D printer and print one of these:


2

Spring-loaded lens caps are designed to grip the filter threads on the lens (or a filter if you have one attached) from the inside. As such, the cap size you need will be the same as the filter diameter. (Note that the filter diameter has nothing to do with the focal length(s) of the lens, which is also measured in millimeters.) Some lenses have a ...


2

At the time when I got fungus on my lenses and camera sensor, I was actively using all of them in bright sunny environments. The humidity in the region was heavy, and so was the fungus growth. The suggestion that you need sunlight into the lens is just a hearsay. It just something people heard somewhere and they repeat it. Scientifically, fungus is ...


2

It's easy to see what comes with the Mount Adapter EF-EOS R at Canon USA's product listing. Just scroll down and click on the "What's included" tab to see the following list: The listings for the Control Ring Mount Adapter EF-EOS R, Drop-in Filter Mount Adapter EF-EOS R with Drop-in Circular Polarizing Filter A, and Drop-in Filter Mount Adapter EF-EOS R ...


2

This doesn't directly answer the question you're asking, but at a more fundamental level, scratches on the front element usually aren't a big deal. Minor scratches probably don't have a visible effect in most of the images you take. See also, What is the effect of a scratched lens? But directly to your question, I can suggest three things: Don't put on the ...


2

This seems like one of those things designed by an overzealous inventor who just got into photography but hasn't been around long enough to learn: Lens caps make decent coasters. But really, mine sit on the lens when the lens is shelved and are removed prior to a gig. As xiota said, shots with lens caps on are unacceptable. The front element of your lens ...


1

AFAIK there are only two types of caps: The "outer pinch" one: which is often the one that comes with the lens, and the "inner pinch" one: that has the nice property of being usable even with a lens hood. Neither has hard and sharp protruding parts on either side. The way you hold an "inner pinch" one makes it very difficult to put it on backwards by ...


1

I would worry that the above solution would interfere with the lens, and of course you would need one for each lens you own, increasing costs even more. While I simply pocket my lens cover these days, previously I used a simple lanyard-type tether: If you are not familiar with this: the little disc has sticky tape that sticks to the lens cap, and the ...


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