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3

Here is the geometry to determine how much shift you theoretically have: C is the diameter of the image circle projected by the lens; h is the height of the image sensor in landscape orientation (i.e., the short edge); w is the width of the image sensor in landscape orientation (i.e., the long edge); sh is the amount of shift (+/-) along the height ...


4

The Hasselblad X1D II has a 43.8mm x 32.9mm sensor. That computes to a diagonal of just under 55mm and an aspect ratio of 4:3 or 1.333:1. With the two lenses in question, and assuming you want to preserve infinity focus by using the lenses' designed registration distance of 44mm: You'd give up pretty much the possibility of any shift with the TS-E 45mm f/...


0

Pity, as I have used these Olympus AF lenses and they are amongst the sharpest with the best bokeh known to man. They are as sharp as Leica and Zeiss with bokeh even better than the early Takumars. I know this from personal use of these lenses on the Olympus AF 77 as well as the power focus Olympus 101. The AF zooms have heavy glass! The AF 77 is a joy to ...


1

Lens design texts often suggest that for some designs, the position of the aperture is relatively critical with regards to vignetting and distortion. However, an MFT camera with a full frame lens only uses the center bit of the imaging circle, so if the adapter causes grave problems in the corners and sides, these problems might be mitigated/attenuated ...


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