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In the case of a picture of a product, the potential issue is trademark infringement (passing off). And sometimes the shape or some other aspect is also trademarked... e.g. both Fender and Gibson headstock shapes are trademarked (see Lawsuit Guitars); and the Gibson Les Paul, SG, and other body shapes are also trademarked (among many other things)... so it ...


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If the guitar were on private property, then you may be liable for breach of privacy if there were other information in the shot. The more unique the guitar the more of an issue. If it is just an item for display in a shop that would be innocent use. Use your head to see if publication could be aproblem. Taking a shot of a guitar painted by an artist... ...


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DISCLAIMER: IANAL and so this answer does constitute legal advice and is purely an opinion. No. There is no case I can think of where you would be required to present a release for an ordinary object. It is, as far as we know from your comment, simply a guitar that is one among many nearly identical productions. It would be the same answer for most objects. ...


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Your question is tagged w/ Canada, and the law in the common law provinces are the same as in the USA... a release form is only required if the image will be used commercially; and the release is required by the one using/publishing the image commercially, not necessarily the photographer (but the photographer is typically the one who obtains it). However, ...


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