23

I imagine most people would find a 50mm lens on an APS-C body to be too long most of the time. When I was in University I photographed events with a 50 f/1.4 on APS-C, whilst I appreciated the speed I always found the focal length to be a little long for full length shots and I was forever walking backwards... If I absolutely had to pick between them I ...


23

Generally speaking, you've hit the nail on the head. How do you know what good sushi is? You go taste lots of sushi that is reported to be good! How do you know what good photography is? You go study and look at photography that is reported to be good (and that you enjoy)! If you're trying to photograph something without having a well defined sense ...


23

If you're going to take courses, I'd suggest you take them in zoology, wildlife preservation and management, or related fields about wildlife. While learning to master your camera and getting the correct lenses and support gear and learning the proper techniques for the type of wildlife you want to shoot is going to be important, the one skill you absolutely ...


23

In the good old days of film photography, when there was no exif, taking extensive notes was the only way of learning from your mistakes - considerable time passed between taking the picture, having your film developed and finally seeing your print. By that time your memory was not a reliable source of information. You can google up "Ansel Adams Exposure ...


17

I own the 40D, and I have all three lenses that you are considering. The 40mm f/2.8 is fun, but f/2.8 isn't nearly as "eye opening"(literally and figuratively) on a crop sensor APS-C body. The 40D really can only go as low as ISO 1250 or so before it becomes unusable(opinion). Indoors without a flash, ISO 1250, f/2.8, and no image stabilizer isn't going to ...


14

Traditionally a price factor, but not anymore. The idea that you should shoot only black and white as a beginning "serious" photographer is both highly subjective and highly restrictive, especially in a world where colour comes at no cost. If you are shooting film and doing your own darkroom work, then there is a distinct price advantage to shooting in ...


14

I think this is a great exercise and can really help you with your photography — even if you end up using zoom lenses in the future. And, there is a commonly-used "trick" here — it's called One Lens, One Camera, One Year, suggested by longtime prime-lens enthusiast Michael Johnston (also see his The Case Against Zooms). A Method The original suggestion was ...


14

As far as I understand photography, your main concern is to record or remember what exactly you wanted to achieve before pressing shutter release. That is, have something that helps you to compare what you wanted with what image you get at the end. In practical terms, for example, it might mean recording what you wanted to be exposed properly (more ...


12

I wouldn't spend any money, unless it is on books, training, or time! If you must spend money, I typically recommend first buying a wide aperture prime lens, but it isn't going to teach you how to take great photography, you already have all of the gear you need to do that. I would recommend putting yourself in an environment full of friends/forums that don'...


12

Start by going outside without your camera and just looking at things. But with a different look: try to pay attention to small details instead of all the rush. You can't do that while you're walking: you'll have to stop for a while, seat in some park, cafe, shopping. And stop looking at the general movement and begin to look/follow those details: a mother ...


12

You don't become a surgeon without first becoming a doctor. Similarly wildlife photography is a specialization of our hobby that you get into later. I would recommend that you first buy a cheap beginner camera and lens and learn basic photography, click pictures of birds, pets and what not. If you find that photography is to your liking then invest in a ...


10

This may seem like a too-broad, unanswerable question, but it's really not. There are two possible answers. I can't tell you which will be right for you, but once I tell you them, I think you'll know which it is. The possibilities are: Even if you don't know what you are doing, go out every day and take at least a dozen photographs. Review your results, ...


10

Take the course. You can only get the most out of any tool if you know how to use it. That is especially true of a tool as complex as a camera used to do a task that is considered an art. You wouldn't upgrade from a family sedan with an automatic transmission to a high end exotic sports car with a non-synchronized manual transmission without getting someone ...


9

Read the Strobist 101 series on the David Hobby's Strobist site. http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/03/lighting-101.html He provides an amazing amount of knowledge on use of small flash. It also provides some homework assignments that can serve as inspiration to help you get out and use it.


8

Tethered selfies are easy to setup, or you could give a try to an "Hair Styling Head" even though that could feel creepy. My solution to this was to do party photography at a local bar to try new techniques and light modifiers. Everything had to be quite portable, but as everything i used was DIY i could deal with it and not be afraid of having it damaged. ...


8

Here's the other side of the argument. This assumes you've got a little bit of time before you go. Buy the SLR and immediately get some practice on local versions of the type of things you want to shoot - ducks and trees in the local park, your own house, your friends etc. Consult the manual and quote possibly a tutorial for beginners. Aim to spend an hour ...


7

My first recommendation is that you familiarize with the basic photography concepts, starting with the exposure triangle. All cameras are based on these principles, so it is important to understand them, even for the cameras like yours that don't let you set some of these settings. Understanding the above will make you realize that calling your camera "...


7

I'd recommend something close to a "normal prime", although for crop, between 25 and 35mm. Sigma spotted the market and sells a 30mm f1.4, Canon has a 28mm f1.8 and an old 35mm f2, and there's a Samyang 35mm F1.4 too. I'd recommend the Sigma. Some people are prone to criticize that lens (They'll tell you to go with a Zeiss 35mm, manual focussing love!), but ...


7

I think this question has already been asked. Here are some. I will add these to the tag wikis What are good resources for a beginning photographer? How to start learning photography? What are the first few photography books someone should read? What blogs should I be following if I am learning photography? What are the best online photo classes? I ...


7

I'd flip your question, as in what aspects that you picked up from a book or website really enabled my photography. Fundamentally, I think you need to read the manual that came with your camera. Its boring, but do it anyway. Read it all, like a novel with your camera in your hands. Then periodically read parts of it, in depth, again. I had a lot of ...


7

Is working as a model a good way to learn photography? It can be, sure. Rather, if the question were more specifically, "is working as a model a good way to learn portrait photography?", sure, why not? Depending on some conditions, that is... Is the photographer good? Is he experienced, does he know how to communicate with and direct models? Does he know ...


7

I wondered if it is a common knowledge how to "jump off" the zoom lens hook I don't think this is necessarily a good idea. The problem is basically sensor size. With a 1/1.7" sensor, it is easy to build compact and light lenses. Even super zoom telephoto lenses are rather compact. The downside is that getting "beautiful pictures with a fast prime lens" ...


7

I agree, kind of...While I agree that the photographer is more important then the equipment, I would rather shoot with my DSLR any day over a point and click or cell phone, The DSLR opens so many possibilities with detachable lenses. You can push limits that you never could with your point and shoots. Your DSLR will let you shoot good quality pictures for ...


6

The free resource you point to (digital photography school) has a great reputation and produces quality content. Start there and don't think about spending money until you start feeling like you you find yourself unable to push your craft forward with the resources available. When you're ready to start investing in being taught, take a look at resources like ...


6

I would consider myself as roughly fitting into that category. I have a couple main suggestions for you. Shoot a lot. Doesn't really matter what format it's in, what camera or lens you use, whatever. Just shoot. After shooting, don't look at your photos right away, for the same reason that film directors often take a vacation between finishing a film shoot ...


6

I come from a technical background and when I started photography (for real, not just bring one when I go to conferences around the world), I saw it as a technical feat, to tame the DLSR. Then at some point I realized that I had nothing to take photos of. and what would it be? That's the hard part of photography. what makes a good photo, what is a good ...


6

Whenever I take a photo I seem to so it exactly the same: small depth of field, very close up, from an angle. As Jeff Daniels' says in The Newsroom, the first step in solving a problem is recognizing that there is one. You've already taken that step. I like the photos you posted a lot, but I can also see why you might feel like your photography is ...


6

I don't think modeling is a good way to learn photography at all. It's a decent way to learn how to plan and perform a shoot but it has very very little with photography. She won't be controlling the aperture, the shutter speed, the lighting, she won't be picking the angles and dictating the composition. She'll be sitting there while he does all of that. It'...


5

If you were teaching someone new to photography the full stop scales, is there a better way then flat out memorizing these values? (1, 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32, 45, 64 ...) Note that all results have 2 significant digits only. Remember 1 and 1.4 as the first two entries. From then on it's interleaved doubling (with never more than 2 ...


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