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24

The main reason is that it is low powered. An raster LCD - color or not - requires much more power and most of them need a permanently on back-light. New OLED display do not need the back-light but still pull more power than a segment-based LCD which has much fewer electronic circuits. Most current top-plate LCDs mirror what is shown in the status line of ...


16

You activated by mistake an advanced view mode. You can switch between view modes by pressing "info" (or maybe "display" for you) when in view mode. The view switchs in that order (sorry for image quality) : Classical View : your photo and some settings and nothing else Classical View with more information : your photo, some settings image quality (JPG/...


15

Read the histogram, not the image on the LCD. In addition to errors because of screen brightness vs ambient brightness, the image on your screen is corrected by your camera before showing it on the screen. Most cameras allow you to adjust that, to remove saturation/sharpening adjustments, but you're still trying to judge your raw image based on an "edited" ...


9

I do not own a Nikon D5100 nor have I used one. From my research online, I believe that the Nikon D5100 does not in fact have a feature such as "Live View Exposure Simulation". This is what you are looking for. Unfortunately, this feature is non existent in Nikon's current offerings. It is common for Canon to have this feature though - that is why you are ...


8

Segment LCD is a technology with the lowest power consumption of all available display technologies and those are more than visible on sunlight or any kind of strong light without any need for background lightning (except at night). Very useful for battery operated devices. It's also the cheapest possible display technology. They are also extremely robust. ...


6

If you are using the viewfinder rather than the LCD, I'm not sure what you could possibly do. A DSLR uses a mirror to redirect light from the lens to the viewfinder and away from the sensor. I guess it might be possible to use a very small macro camera that could be mounted to the viewfinder itself, but I'd think the quality would be marginal compared to ...


5

You can't, the Nikon D200 is too old to be able to read the sensor in realtime in order to show you the image on the LCD screen. That feature was introduced with the D300 / D90


5

If I am understanding you correctly, it sounds like you are taking a photo with the aperture set to less than the smallest f/ number possible for the lens. When you use a smaller aperture (larger f/number) then the image is darker and the depth of field is bigger (resulting in a sharper background). When you look through the viewfinder, the aperture is ...


5

All of the mentioned advantages and disadvantages of an accessory EVF are true, except that I also tend to leave my accessory viewfinder attached to my Ricoh GR at all times, so there's no real risk of losing it. But as much as I like having mine attached, I only use it for about 5% of my photos. I would not buy an EVF for the NEX-5R. Part of this is simple ...


5

This is not a problem with the LCD screen. The images are under exposed. In easy terms, not enough light is hitting the sensor to 'take' the picture, so it's coming out black. When it's blurred, it's because the shutter speed is too long and is recording everything in sees in the period of time the shutter is open (hence the blur as if you're handholding, ...


5

It's on page 129 of the EOS Rebel T3i/600D Instruction Manual It appears your camera is currently set to 16:9. To do what you want, you need to set it to 3:2.


4

Yes, yes and yes. An EVF is extremely advantageous over the LCD and I would just keep it on most of the time. No need to take it off, even in the camera bag, assuming it fits. The advantages you list are all correct: Holding the camera steady is easier because you have it closer to your body and there is an additional point of contact. Framing is also ...


4

No, they are not. The G9 X has a 3" LCD with 3:2 aspect-ratio while the G9 has a 3" LCD with 4:3 aspect-ratio. The G9 uses a 4:3 screen because that aspect-ratio matches its sensor. Both images and video from the G9 have the same aspect-ratio, so there is little need to use a screen of a different aspect. The sensor on the G9 X has a 3:2 aspect-ratio and ...


4

What is that camera? The camera you've pictured appears to be a Nikon D750. How many cameras these days have it especially Nikon D5300? Well, pretty much all digital SLR cameras have full color screens so that they can display image previews. How much color they use in their menu and control screens is a bit more variable. This YouTube video about the ...


3

If the back screen tilts up, you can use it from above too. I note that the old fashioned LCD on the top screen is readable in sunlight. It uses a backlight to read in the dark, but is read using ambient reflected light in daylight. The LCD screen is unreadable outside even in moderate sun. I further note that the backlight has "regressed" from an even ...


3

I know this is an old question, but I just tried using an iPhone to record through my DSLR viewfinder and it seemed to work ok.


3

There's no reason you have to turn it off, but it can be less distracting and will save batteries. The discontinued D60 model used to turn off the rear panel when you held the camera to your eye, but the newer models don't have that. Higher end models, like the D7100, have a separate small LCD panel on the top of the camera, which is useful for adjusting ...


3

Whether an image is automatically displayed or not following capture can be turned on or off using the menu on all digital Canon EOS cameras. If you have selected a setting that displays the image, you can also select from several options that determine for how long the review image is displayed. You may have turned it off without realizing what you were ...


3

This is Nikon P900's focus peaking feature, which is an aid for manual focus. This feature helps show where the camera is focusing by highlighting what it perceives as in-focus sharp edges in white. As you can see from Nikon's video, or this review, you turn the wheel on the back to adjust focus, and can press up and down to change the amount of white shown....


3

It's not the best photo I've ever taken, but this photo of the D5300 menu shows the previews of the six available options for its Info screen:


2

This may be cumbersome, but may work: By making a customized bracket based on the hole for the tripod mount you may be able to align a "secondary" camera pointing at the viewfinder of your DSLR. The recommended camera is the smallest available that can record video in a suitable format ant that can also be connected to a TV or monitor, OR has an LCD panel ...


2

Along with exposure simulation, the D5100 also doesn't have a depth of field preview. Most Nikon models have a button which will close the lens aperture temporarily to let you see how the final f/stop will affect your focus/depth of field. The D5100 does not have this. However this thread DOF in Live View suggests that after taking a shot in live view mode ...


2

Once you start using a DSLR in a way that pushes its limits then you are "supposed" to use it in the manner that best suits and/or pleases you, and or that best enables you to achieve the maximum from the camera as determined solely by you, and/or that makes you maximally happy. Some other people may have strong preferences as to how a camera should be used ...


2

This is what I would recommend: Try a second lens that is in known working condition Reset user settings by entering your Menu> Settings menu(pg 76 in your manual) Restore default settings by holding the QUAL and +/- buttons together for > 2 seconds(pg 151 in your manual) Reset all custom settings(pg 296 in your manual) Consult a Nikon-authorized service ...


2

Those LCD are probably already displaying every information you want/need, and probably more. Mine (EOS 7D) has : ISO Aperture Shutter speed White balance options Battery charge JPG and RAW size Exposition Metering mode Focus mode Number of pictures left I doubt displaying more would be any help and have a proof of it : even the main display won't show you ...


2

Unless you want to replace it yourself, you should ask around in repair shops, for the cost of it and the replacement. If you want the adventure, check on Alibaba, usually they sell wholesale, so you will have to ask around, and also getting speedy and quality service from China is tricky many times. I suggest the first option above.


2

As put in the comment, the colored halo is moire (helped a lot by the RGB pixel of the screen that plays havoc with the the Bayer filter in the camera). The distortion seems a combination of normal wide angle lens distortion and a non perfectly parallel camera/screen position. You can avoid all this by taking a screenshot of your desktop (OS dependent; ...


2

Since both the camera and your computer are displaying the same file, the problem likely isn't in the way your applications, EOS Utility 2 and Lightroom 3, are handling the files. The issue is most likely in the way the camera's display system and the computer's display system are handling the files. You can't do much about the camera's display system, ...


2

Usually connectors are "keyed" so they'll only go in one way, but it sounds like you got the wiring installed incorrectly. Check all the connectors between the camera and screen to be sure that they are inserted the right way and that you haven't forced any in backwards.


2

This seems to be a camera fault. Most possibly a hardware problem of the position sensor. If the camera is still new, make a warranty claim. This is an obvious bug. Good luck.


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