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21

I can't believe no one suggested this yet: Just use the rectangular marquee to select what you want to crop down to, and COPY it to your clipboard. Then delete the entire layer and PASTE what you copied to a new layer. This is especially useful if the layer you're cropping is larger than the canvas, in which case the select-inverse technique is messy.


16

Use a layer mask. Tutorials galore exist on the topic already, eg: http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/masking-layers.html Straight from Adobe: You can add a mask to a layer and use the mask to hide portions of the layer and reveal the layers below. Masking layers is a valuable compositing technique for combining multiple photos into a single image or ...


13

You can also select the area you want to crop to with the rectangular marquee tool, invert your selection, then delete the now selected outside area. This is different from the layer mask in that it completely deletes the surrounding area, whereas the mask makes the surrounding area invisible.


9

There is a method that can yield some good results given good enough original photos. I don't have the original article on hand, but I can describe the method, but it's up to you to find the particular details that you need to get your desired results. Let's start by merging just two images. Load them in a single Photoshop document's layers. It doesn't ...


8

In short, no. What you're doing is not really related. Layer masks are basically ways of working with the alpha channel of a layer. Adjustment layers aren't really layers at all — they're ways of thinking of filters within the same metaphor. They don't actually accomplish anything you couldn't do simply by applying the filters in the traditional way. However,...


7

I didn't have enough "reputation" to address some of these answers as comments. AJ Henderson is wrong, 30 1s exposures will (for the most part) be identical to 1 30s exposure. If it shows up in a 30s exposure, then stacking 30 1s exposures will also show it. I am actually the author of the article that Trengot linked (thanks!). In fact, unless you are ...


6

In the Mask tab you can select regions of the picture that you don't want Hugin to use in the final panorama. You just have to be careful to not mask out a part of the panorama that only exists in that low-res picture, because then you will get a hole.


6

Open both documents select the group you want to move and now you have 2 options: Right-click on the group (in the layers tab) and click "Duplicate Group..." Under "Destination" change the value "Document" with the target document (the one that will receive the Group). The layers will be aligned to TOP-LEFT. Drag and drop group of layers in the second ...


6

Straight away I should mention that lunar photography is different that astrophotography of deep-sky objects. The types of frames you are describing (calibration frames) are extremely helpful for deep-sky objects but not as useful for lunar photography. You probably wont need to worry too much about noise in lunar photography because you can take those ...


5

At least in my computers (Windows, various versions) editing a .jpg file in Photoshop and saving it creates a situation where, if there is some type of embedded thumbnail, Photoshop does not update it, later on while viewing the file in another program (Windows Image Viewer for example) the thumbnail is loaded first and shown (upscaled to fit) while the ...


5

Yes, two ways I know of: Go to the channels palette. Select the channel you want. Ctrl-click (Cmd-Click on a Mac), to copy the channel. Then go back to your layer and add your mask or create a blank, white mask on your layer make sure the mask is selected go to Image > Apply Image select the channel you want from the channel dropdown click ok I ...


5

The comments have really answered the question here: The behaviour you're seeing is as you should expect. The settings for adjustment layers alone have no equivalence in any of the TIFF content standards. TIFF does allow for vendor specific extensions and this would be an example of one but saving to a nonstandard TIFF would be pointless if nobody could ...


5

Fundamentally you're capturing the same amount of light in either case so the results should be the same. Practically, there are 2 differences between stacking 30 one second exposures and shooting one 30 second exposure. The first is the light lost between each one second exposure after the shutter closes before it reopens for the next exposure. This can ...


5

The fastest way is to get the leaves/objects, add them around the object and take the photo. On such way you will not need to carry about the shadows, they will be on the right place and direction. Of course preparation for the shoot is not so fast and easy. Also you do not have much control on the places. But IMO is much faster and natural. About the ...


5

I would like to address cat picture specifically. If with other images it is possible to position objects precisely, cat might show character and mess things up. To go around this, I guess, photographer would take two images, probably using tripod to have same background. First image is the subject (cat), the second one is image of small objects. Then ...


4

The high pass filter is not something that can generate a mask of the skin tones within an image, hence why you wouldn't see much success trying to use it for this purpose. One possible solution would be to use PhotoShops Select → Color Range... option. I think in CS6 onwards there's an option in the Select drop-down box of "Skin Tones" This can be used ...


4

This has been asked and answered three years ago, but I'd like to refine the difference between the two types of layers. The normal layers in Photoshop are like you said "image layers", personally I prefer calling them "raster layers". The adjustment layers in Photoshop are data layers. They hold no function other than to overlay certain changes to ...


3

As far as I know, the only values that can be brushed are the ones shown in the brush. I would guess that Adobe feels the others are out of the scope of lightroom, which is "only" a image editing tool, not an image creating tool like photoshop. So maybe you'd need photoshop and use the RAW file from there.


3

I've never had a reason to do this but to my knowledge there's no automatic way within Photoshop. You would need to just manually refine them as required. However, if you have the entire Adobe Creative Suite subscription than After Effects can make pretty short work of something like this using the Motion Tracker. If you're making an animated timelapse it ...


3

As this is a photography forum, go and prepare your leaves. Not only bring them home but probably put some weight to it; a sticky tape and a piece of playdoh so they do not move when you or the subject moves around. Work indoors, and prepare some direct light to emulate sunlight. Put the strobes pretty far and probably use an orange gel to simulate golden ...


2

After you make your adjustments in ACR, press Shift and then instead of Open Image, you'll see Open Object. That will create the layer as a smart object and you can then go back to ACR from that smart object layer. I believe you'd have to have known to do that from the start. I'm not aware of anyway to reopen a layer in ACR after the fact if you haven't ...


2

You might also try grouping the layers together and applying your mask to the group. This way you can drop as many adjustments as you like and only the masked area will be affected. Select all layers you wish to group and use Cmd-G or click the folder icon in the layers palette. Good luck.


2

You'd most likely want to use one of the marquee tools. This will select an area in a crop like fashion and you can then delete the inside or the outside by right clicking and selecting 'select inverse'. and that is how i crop inside one layer :)


2

No, you can't crop a single layer. The closest thing would be to copy the layer to a new image, crop that image, and copy the layer back to the original image. It's easier just to erase or mask the part of the layer that you don't want.


2

When shooting, make sure the lighting is similar for best results. It wouldn't surprise me if the photo of her standing up was taken right before or after the main one in the same place. Then, it is a matter of removing the background from the photo that you want to nest in. It can be done with some automated techniques if the background is a different ...


2

This explains how to merge multiple short exposures to mimic the effect of a longer exposure. It's aimed at emulating ND filter photos but the principal should be the same. The basic premise is to take multiple shorter shots and then use a tool like Hugin to align and ImageMagick to convert them into in a single image. The result is effectively the same as ...


2

First of all, when making a lightprobe, the images need to be taken at 90-degrees from each other, not opposite sides of the sphere. If you take them 180-degrees from each other, the bits you want to replace will exactly overlap each other. Secondly, you need to "unwrap" each image to a flat mapping that's a full 360 panorama--they aren't half-180-...


2

Press the "D" key. This will reset to the default background color of white, and foreground color of black. You can also press "X" to switch them back and forth. After you have done that, a new layer will be the color of the current background color which you have reset to white. If you close Photoshop and reopen, it should retain that setting.


2

Although quite laborious, one way to get to where you want to go would be to edit the raw file globally in Lightroom and export a separate version of the entire photo edited specifically for each of the areas you wish to develop differently. Then combine them using masking and layering in photoshop.


2

Right click your mask layer and click Blending Options (also accessible if you double click the blank area to the right of the layer name, though I often accidentally select the layer name when I try to do that). There's an option there called Blend If: and a range of luminance sliders which I think could be used for your purposes. You'd still have to set ...


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