Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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There are a few reasons why ISO numbers may be different. The first is the inherent sensitivity/reactivity of the sensor (photodiodes). With a lower ISO being less reactive. The second is that different models/makers may use different ISO standards; which result in a different ISO rating. I.e. most compact cameras use the SOS standard (Standard Output ...


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There's nothing magical about the value 100. In fact, early film had ISO values in the double and even single digits. Theoretically, there is no lowest value — well, zero, because it goes to fractions rather than negative numbers. Lower ISO means less sensitive. It means that shutter speed needs to be slightly slower or aperture slightly wider to get the ...


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When photographing artwork there are two concerns - ensuring that the light is even and is positioned in a way to minimize hot spots and minimizing surface reflections that can distort colors and contrast. The standard way of achieving the first goal is to use a copy stand, which consists of a baseboard to place the artwork on, a pole or column to attach ...


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Lead pencil drawings are problematic to photograph due to the properties of graphite. Graphite is a metal not a typical organic pigment, per se. Pencil lead is a metal/clay combination. The clay holds the pencil "lead" shape. Various proportions of each determine whether the mark made is dark or light with the same amount of pressure upon the point. When ...


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We use the Guide Number as an aid to gauge the f-number setting. Accept, as an example, your ISO setting is 200. You consult a table of guide numbers and discover it’s 180. Your principal subject is 10 feet downstream of the flash. What would be the appropriate f-number setting? To compute, we divide guide number by distance -- thus 150 ÷ 10 = 15.5. Now ...


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Both of the other answers are correct, but I think there might be an easier way to understand it: Consider being in a completely black room with no light... the shutter can be open indefinitely because there is no light available. The only thing that matters is that the shutter is fully open when the flash fires so that all of the sensor can see it. The ...


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The simple equation assumes that the flash is effectively the only source of light in your image. This is a reasonable assumption in many cases, because since exposure works on an exponential scale, the amount of light from typical indoor room lighting is a drop in a bucket compared to that provided by the flash. See Do flash guide numbers assume some ...


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Flash duration is typically much shorter than most cameras' flash sync speed. If the flash only has a duration of, say, 1/1000 second (or 1 millisecond), it matters not if the shutter is open 1/250 second (4 milliseconds) or 1/25 second (40 milliseconds), the energy from the flash that is captured by the photo will be the same in either case. What shutter ...


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I was wondering: how is it possible for a smaller sensor to perform better in low-light, if it is capturing much less light than the bigger sensor? Short answer: We don't know that it is capturing much less light than the bigger sensor. Longer answer: Smaller sensors capture less light than larger sensor when certain assumptions are made: Both cameras ...


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"I was wondering: how is it possible for a smaller sensor to perform better in low-light, if it is capturing much less light than the bigger sensor?" It really isn't possible; unless there is a significant difference in the technology in use (i..e CCD/CMOS/BIS sensors). In this case both sensors are of the same design, but possibly different generations... ...


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It's hard to really tell from the small versions here — which is a lesson in itself, because at 1280x850, which is a perfectly fine online viewing size, the differences really don't matter that much. However, in this case, I think Auto probably did make some better choices. Shutter Speed You picked ¹⁄₆₀th of a second. This is fine, but probably slightly ...


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