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36

Firstly the iPhone 5 lens has to be f/2.2, due to the small pixel size, the effects of diffraction which start to creep in at f/11 on a DSLR, start to creep in at f/1.45 on a 5.6mm (diagonal) sensor! I though that in order to have a big aperture such as f/2.2 a big amount of light should be able to enter to the sensor and in order to do it, a big lens was ...


23

The sensors and lenses of even the most humble DSLR or mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (ILCs) currently on the market are far better than those found in the best phone cameras. Sensors and glass can only take one so far, though. The current crop of top smartphones have leveraged the power of computational photography¹ in a way that most ILCs don't. ...


14

The easiest way is to take a Live Photo, then while viewing it in the Photos app, swipe up to access effects and choose Long Exposure. This will blend the frames of Live Photo together into a single image. I'm not sure how necessary a tripod is for this; since you're expected to hold your phone while shooting, I'd imagine the stabilization+blending software ...


13

Many older or cheaper phone cameras use a "fixed focus" lens. ie it is always set to focus a specific distance away from the camera. This is usually set to the "hyperfocal distance", ie everything from half that distance out to infinity is in focus. This depends on just what is acceptable as 'in focus'. But most photos from these cameras will be sharp ...


13

For whatever reason, the ColorSpace tag is not very useful in EXIF. The only standard values are 1 (sRGB) and 65535 ("uncalibrated"). All other values are reserved. Some cameras use them to mean Adobe RGB or something else, but this is non-standard. Apple is, in fact, using Something Else, and that's found elsewhere in the metadata. With ExifTool, looking ...


12

According to this the iPhone SE has an 29mm-equivalent lens, so on a Fuji with a 23.6x15.6 sensor (Fuji XT-3)(crop factor 1.53) you need a 29/1.53=19mm lens for the same field of view.


9

Almost certainly those LEDs are flickering. There are valid reasons why LED displays are designed so that only some of the LEDs are on at any one time, but I won't go into the electronics here. Apparently your shutter speed was faster then the total LED refresh interval, so the camera only caught some of the LEDs on. Use a slower shutter speed, like 1/50 ...


9

F values are relative to the focal length; the absolute aperture size of an f/2.2 lens is 1/2.2 times the focal length of the lens. Cellphone cameras have tiny sensors and thus large crop factors - their focal lengths are typically only a few millimeters. Even with a large relative aperture the absolute size of the aperture is only a millimeter or two.


9

Assumptions I think this is a combination of using digital zoom (or cropping) and flash. I don't own an iPhone SE but a Samsung S8. On a high level they have comparable cameras though. iPhone SE camera specs (it doesn't specify what wide is unfortunately): 12 MP, f/1.8 (wide), PDAF, OIS Samsung S8 camera specs: 12 MP, f/1.7, 26mm (wide), 1/2.55", 1....


8

It depends on which camera app you're using, and on which version of iOS. If you're using Camera.app (the inbuilt camera app) on iOS 10.2 or later: Camera.app uses only the middle two lens identifications in the list above — the ones that say "iPhone 7 Plus back dual camera". Depending on which lens was used, you'll get either "3.99mm f/1.8" or "6.6mm f/2....


7

Any decent camera with some degree of macro capabilities will be a feasible slide/negative scanner, but, tthere are some other factors that incide a lot in the results. The first is an adequate backlighting device. Can be as complicated or as simple as you wish, as long as it allows you to get good exposure. I have tried different combinations of flash and ...


7

This feature is now built in to the new iPhone 5, and is also available on the iPhone 4S (if you have updated to iOS6). The same feature is also built into Android devices with the (little known) panoramic feature. Camera > Settings > Shooting Mode > Panorama Short video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txwdD11sW1s


7

Absolutely. There is a great dongle+app, offered by TriggerTrap. I purchased it and I'm super happy with it. If I recall correctly, the app is available for iOS and Android. EDIT: Some of the free app's options are as follows: Simple cable release Press and hold Press and lock Timed release Timelapse TimeWarp (time lapse + acceleration) DistnaceLapse (...


7

Third-party camera application It does not appear that the default application on iOS has any fine-grained control mode. But you can achieve that if you use a third-party camera application that gives you access to it. This page examines how to achieve the kind of control DSLR camera users are accustomed to, and it specifically mentions long exposure of ...


7

With phone cameras it is as much about the computational things done to it after the raw data is collected from the sensor as it is about the hardware specs. You can certainly use hardware bad enough that no amount of computational photography will overcome it. But by and large most of the hardware used in upper tier phones is good enough. It's often how ...


6

EDIT: Regarding your edit. That is NOT HDMI output. What you are looking at is tethered shooting. It is available directly for Android here. For now on iOS, you need an intermediate computer to do the relay and this app. ORIGINAL ANSWER: If that DSLR is the Canon EOS 6D, you just need the Canon App (iOS and Android) and will be connected wirelessly. You ...


6

For all intents and purposes, that would be 8-bits per channel or 24-bit per pixels because what you get out from the camera is a JPEG image and that is its limit. The sensor internally is highly likely to have a greater bit-depth, maybe 10 or 12 bits per channel. This is actually needed to produce an 8-bit-per-channel JPEG because sensor output is linear ...


6

No, larger sensor cameras are not more likely to mis-focus - if you take the Canon 1DX (with a modern lens) for example, it's a full-frame camera that's about as far away from "likely to mis-focus" as possible. But when a large sensor camera mis-focuses it's more noticeable, especially when most tiny sensor cameras (cellphones) have wide angle lenses. The ...


6

TL;DR: yes, the video mode is cropped by approx. 1.28× (calculated by measurement). The effective video focal length is 36mm (in 35mm equivalent). I read (in a user comment) that the iPhone's focal length is longer when shooting video because the frame is cropped slightly to enable video stabilization. Is this true? It appears to be true that the video ...


6

Nope. The reason is that all of the raw data is not represented in any single interpretation of that data used to produce a JPEG image. Much of the raw data has been discarded and can not be recovered. When you open a raw image file with an application what you see on the screen is not the unfiltered, raw data. It is one interpretation of the raw data based ...


6

I got some decent fireworks pictures from this year's Fourth of July show. At this point I'd expect you to stop as you don;t actually have a photographic problem. I was bragging about my "real" camera's ability to take shots like that compared to an iPhone. I'd regard that as the real problem here. If your photo is genuinely better than your friend's ...


6

The iPhone has a relatively wide fixed aperture. For example, on iPhone 7 Plus, it's f/1.8 for wide-angle and f/2.8 for telephoto. Since the aperture is fixed, according to exposure triangle proper exposure must be obtained only by adjusting shutter speed and sensor sensitivity. Fastest shutter speed 1/8000s is similar to what you'd see in a larger camera, ...


6

Your options for resizing the 16:9 image mentioned to be 1:1 in size are Crop it Letterbox it Stretch it Let's pretend the image is 16x9 instead of 16:9 (units are irrelevant.) Crop, taking the sides off so that the image becomes "9x9." This is the most obvious way but OP states it is undesirable Letterbox, place blank space above and below so that it ...


6

You can convert your phone into a make-shift macro camera by applying a small drop in front of the lens. In humid conditions when water is condensing or during rain etc this might occur accidentially. The drop size determines the extend of the macro effect (smaller drops mean smaller focal lense, thus stronger macro effect). There is a very brief description ...


5

You can use an optical trigger app in your iPhone. This reverses the roles, the iPhone takes a picture when you fire your flash. The one app I know that does this is iSyncFlash.


5

You could try using Registax. Generally, Registax is used for astrophotography, particularly of the planets in our solar system. Registax uses the concept of superresolution to stack hundreds or thousands of frames, discard the worst, keep the best, then interpolate the information from all of those frames in such a way that it enhances detail and resolution....


5

I know that you asked for a non-command-line solution, but I think that this one is simple enough to post. Moreover, I noticed the "no CLI" only after I wrote it, so... maybe could be useful for someone else. There is an example doing exactly that (although for a different objective --- long exposure without ND filters) that I think it is what you need in ...


5

It looks like the rolling shutter interacting with the vibrations. It could be scanning horizontally, and the vibration comes in pulses. You could see it in a Big-Small-Big-Small pattern, from left to right.


5

I don't have the reputation to comment, so am adding this bit as an answer. In addition to the answer by @Jahaziel (camera position, lighting) - also check out scanning applications like Genius Scan. The app uses your camera, auto-crops, and then bumps the contrast to clearly show a white page and black writing.


5

Peering at the pixels of these images really isn't going to tell you a whole lot. They both show a lot of noise. It looks like the first image has more noise reduction applied: it appears to have fewer speckles ("noise"), but also seems "smeared". The lower image has more apparent noise, but also sharper lines and contrast. There is probably more actual ...


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