42

TL;DR - Pretty much everything in your post indicates that you don't really need a new camera, but need to learn how to use the equipment that you have. I haven't used RAW... it still boggles my mind a bit that the RAW to JPEG conversion can't have an option to do this automatically. This is like driving a race car and never shifting past second. The ...


12

Almost any camera system will out perform a camera phone when used properly. A camera phone uses a tiny sensor so even MFT cameras have a bigger sensor capturing more light so superior in low light conditions. Phones use night mode to overcome their bad high ISO performance. Night mode in most cases is a merge of several images to get more information. ...


7

The reason not all wired remote shutter releases are universal, regardless of whether they do or do not have built-in timers, is that not all cameras have the same size/shape connecting plug to attach them to the camera. The controller you linked to above gets around this by supplying a plethora of adapters to fit just about any camera currently on the ...


7

Turns out you have to set the cameras time zone and time.


6

It's most likely to do with the additional complexities required surrounding counting 4 digits, and displaying 4 digits on LCD screens. A chip that counts to 999 and stops before 1000 is probably much cheaper than a chip or IC (integrated Circuit) that counts to 9999 and stops before 10000. Likewise, real estate on LCD screens is at a premium, so fitting in ...


5

Google for intervalometer and tethering Not every cameras have an internal intervalometer; most higher-end camera have one (check user manuals). For camera with no internal intervalometer, you can use an external intervalometer gadget, again, check that your camera support it, again, maybe not all camera support that either. Depending on the photo ...


5

If your photo is all white it is over exposed. What are you taking a picture of? The night sky? Or a bright daylight scene? And while i frequently use auto iso , i don't use it for long exposures, certainly not bulb. I'd start by setting a low iso value, say 100, then raise it as needed.


4

Try a 3 second 2 minute 2 second interval, and it should work. The interval has to be a bit longer than the shutter time. The shutter time has to occur in that interval. A one second interval will not do a two second shutter. EDIT: changed interval, longer than the shutter duration. See comments. This manual posted by twalberg says "at least two seconds"....


4

This could not be necessary, since my experience with a Rebel XSi is that it goes to sleep automatically and doesn't draw much power in this state, I once awoke it after at least two weeks of sleep and the battery was still full. So if you can make the go-to-sleep delay as short as possible (and possibly reduce other consumption such as the rear screen and ...


3

Most intervalometers limit a specified number of frames to 999 images or less. However, many intervalometers will also allow you to set them to shoot indefinitely until the intervalometer or camera's battery is exhausted or the memory card is filled. Most cheap generic intervalometers are based on the same internal components. They're a lot like cheap ...


3

Your assumption is incorrect. The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 can shoot up to 9999 frames. It's 9999 instead of 999 simply because they chose to dedicate space for another digit. I doubt there is a apreciable difference in cost for doing so. Similar question arise regarding Bracketing and Multiple Exposures. For each setting, the limit has to be chosen ...


3

The trick would be to find a transmitter that could receive the 2.5mm plug from your wired intervalometer. I'm not sure any such commercial product exists. It would probably be cheaper and easier to just buy a commercially available wireless intervalometer that fits your two cameras. Either of the two below would do what you want. https://www.amazon.com/...


3

However a friend of mine challenged me if it's possible to shoot on the same spot without a fixed camera with just remembering tripod settings and lenses, once a week for over a year and just stitch edit/stabilized in post? It's certainly possible. The camera doesn't know or care if it's been moved or locked in place the whole time, so if you have a ...


3

You might need more than a two-second margin -- on some camera settings, internal noise reduction takes as long as the photo, so it might be 25 or more seconds between shots. Turn off preview, not so much to save time, but to save power usage. On my camera, I find that the LCD back-light drains the battery more than the exposure itself. A reasonable ...


3

Two ways you might do this: According to PC World, a smart phone or tablet can control the camera. "You can zoom the lens, set the self-timer, control the flash output, and fire the shutter." If you can find (or write) an app to do this, you have a free intervalometer. CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit) can be installed from memory card in a few minutes. ...


3

What you want to do should actually be possible. First of all, you'll want to download the Canon SDK (Software Development Kit) from http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/standard_display/sdk_homepage. Since you appear to be in Europe, your page is http://www.didp.canon-europa.com/ (found from the Canon USA page linked above). It indicates the SDK is ...


3

Can i use intervalometer to engage continuous shooting (setting continuous with speed ~5fps on camera instead of bulb) for 20 seconds and delay/timer of few minutes ? (with sony a6000) Yes, you can (assuming you mean an external intervalometer hooked to the camera's wired cable release port). When the cable release completes the "full press" circuit via the ...


3

So can I use the cheaper Sony intervalometer on the Samsung camera? No, you cannot. While the Sony multi-terminal connector looks like it's micro-USB, it isn't, really. doc-diy.net's list of shutter release pinouts has an image of the connector, and its wiring is nothing like a micro USB connector. It has an additional 10 pins (15 in all) vs. the standard ...


3

The most obvious workaround is to use an external wired shutter release with a built-in intervalometer. Before cameras started including internal intervalometers, that's the way we had to do it. Third party units can be had fairly cheaply for around $20 or so. There are also wireless versions starting at around $45. You set the camera with whatever manual ...


2

Select shutter speed required in manual or check approximate auto shutter speed. In the menu select interval timing (camera date & time must be set) - go for "now" option it's easier. Select the interval period - this MUST - be longer than the shutter time - set number of intervals required and choose 1 shot per interval (experiment later!) that should ...


2

I've encountered the same issue with my D7000. To get more than 100 I have to intervene just before it hits the 100 mark. When doing star trails I set the mode to Continuous Low and lock the shutter button down with the corded remote. Just before 50 minutes are up I come back to the camera and release the shutter button. When the 30 second exposure is ...


2

Sorry, the P520 will only expose for up to 8S at ISO100. For 200 and 400 it's 4 seconds, decreasing to 1/2 second max at HI1 ~ISO64000) This is very disappointing and is teh weakest aspect of an otherwise excellent camera IMHO.


2

Taking a look at page 78 of the manual as far as I can tell your camera does not have any option to extend beyond 8 seconds in camera. I also don't see an option for a remote control or shutter release that would give that ability. You could(and should) stack multiple 8 second exposures in post processing though. Take a look at this existing question: How ...


2

Nope. You may want to follow this location for any 3rd party firmware updates for that feature besides any Nikon updates for that model. But in the meantime, your best bet is an external lightweight unit that can be taped to the drone. Here's one helpful guide.


2

I found the passage below in the Reference Manual and was wondering if the problem might be that I did not set the interval long enough to allow the camera to record some images to the memory card: “Because shutter speed and the time needed to record the image to the memory card may vary from shot to shot, intervals may be skipped if the camera is still in ...


2

Best guess, the intervalometer is either bad or improperly configured.


2

The Canon Powershot SX60 has a 2.5mm cable release port, like any Canon dRebel does. Any cable intervalometer that works with a Canon dRebel should also work with the SX60.


2

What would be easier to do accurately is to have a system that combines a timing function with a system that gives an index signal at the start of a revolution and then series of pulses indicating rotational increments. This is easy to do in a number of ways. Use of an Arduino or similar could see the core part implemented for under $10*. Once you have the ...


2

I had the exact same problem - I could use the intervalometer to focus, but not to shoot. Turns out it really was just a connection issue. I just blew lightly on the contact point (my camera is a couple of years old and I've never had to use that port before), and the intervalometer worked like a charm afterward.


2

What you're looking for is called an intervalometer. Unfortunately, nobody seems to have specifically made one that replaces Nikon's ML-L3 wireless shutter release (the remote that Nikon mentions on page 116 of the P900 Reference Manual). This dpreview.com thread asks about your same problem — looking for an intervalometer for the P900. The only response ...


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