42

TL;DR - Pretty much everything in your post indicates that you don't really need a new camera, but need to learn how to use the equipment that you have. I haven't used RAW... it still boggles my mind a bit that the RAW to JPEG conversion can't have an option to do this automatically. This is like driving a race car and never shifting past second. The ...


12

Almost any camera system will out perform a camera phone when used properly. A camera phone uses a tiny sensor so even MFT cameras have a bigger sensor capturing more light so superior in low light conditions. Phones use night mode to overcome their bad high ISO performance. Night mode in most cases is a merge of several images to get more information. ...


7

Bulb ramping, or bramping, is a means of automatically adjusting exposure settings to maintain a specific exposure value (EV) throughout the duration of a time-lapse sequence. Bulb ramping intervalometers can be simple and cheap, or complex and expensive, depending on the results they can provide. Cheaper ones, and many DIY projects that you can follow to ...


7

Your camera can take exposures that are longer than 30 seconds, this is called Bulb mode. In this mode the exposure lasts for as long as you keep the shutter button pressed. For this kind of photography you might want to use a remote shutter cable, so that you do not have to physically touch the camera and risk moving it during the exposure. For your other ...


6

The reason not all wired remote shutter releases are universal, regardless of whether they do or do not have built-in timers, is that not all cameras have the same size/shape connecting plug to attach them to the camera. The controller you linked to above gets around this by supplying a plethora of adapters to fit just about any camera currently on the ...


6

It's most likely to do with the additional complexities required surrounding counting 4 digits, and displaying 4 digits on LCD screens. A chip that counts to 999 and stops before 1000 is probably much cheaper than a chip or IC (integrated Circuit) that counts to 9999 and stops before 10000. Likewise, real estate on LCD screens is at a premium, so fitting in ...


5

The SDK does contain the information you need already. For example, the Nikon D90 SDK (which just happens to be the first of the list I pulled from the SDK's I have on file) has D90UsbMtpE_01.doc which contains the MTP Specs which define what the camera can do and the messages you can pass via usb to make that happen.


5

There are two way accessory companies get the information needed to connect to cameras: Most common, they reverse engineer the protocol - obviously this is quite difficult and not something a normal person can do alone, also, the protocol can change in subtle ways between models and you have no way of knowing it. Very rare, they pay the camera manufacturer ...


5

Google for intervalometer and tethering Not every cameras have an internal intervalometer; most higher-end camera have one (check user manuals). For camera with no internal intervalometer, you can use an external intervalometer gadget, again, check that your camera support it, again, maybe not all camera support that either. Depending on the photo ...


5

If your photo is all white it is over exposed. What are you taking a picture of? The night sky? Or a bright daylight scene? And while i frequently use auto iso , i don't use it for long exposures, certainly not bulb. I'd start by setting a low iso value, say 100, then raise it as needed.


4

Promote Systems has what you need. Buy Promote Remote Control with bulb ramping kit. It is the best and most powerful solution on the market. What makes it "best and most powerful"? It's got more features than a swiss knife! Single Shot mode Stack focusing (dream feature for macro photographers) High Dynamic Range (up to 9 EV stops, much higher than any ...


4

The first option, and i guess that is what you activated can be found here: The Canon T2i's Drive setting also accesses three Self-Timer modes, which open the shutter 10 or 2 seconds after the Shutter button is pressed, giving you time to dash around in front of the camera. The third mode will take a programmable amount of shots (2 to 10 shots), ...


4

This could not be necessary, since my experience with a Rebel XSi is that it goes to sleep automatically and doesn't draw much power in this state, I once awoke it after at least two weeks of sleep and the battery was still full. So if you can make the go-to-sleep delay as short as possible (and possibly reduce other consumption such as the rear screen and ...


4

Turns out you have to set the cameras time zone and time.


3

For the T3i at least, if HDR and timelapse is the goal, MagicLantern could do what you want. It's unclear if they'll ever get MagicLantern working on a 7D though (current status)


3

If you're crafty, you can make something that uses your computer's serial port (or get a USB adapter for a missing port). There are lots of instructions around the web. This website goes into great detail: http://www.beskeen.com/projects/dslr_serial/dslr_serial.shtml Stark Labs offers a software-based intervalometer that can control these USB/Serial ...


3

By googling around the web I stumbled upon DIY Photo Bits' Camera Control. From version 3.0 and upwards it supports a time lapse feature. According to the compatibility list the D3000 should work with this software on Windows 7 and Vista.


3

What you want to do should actually be possible. First of all, you'll want to download the Canon SDK (Software Development Kit) from http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/standard_display/sdk_homepage. Since you appear to be in Europe, your page is http://www.didp.canon-europa.com/ (found from the Canon USA page linked above). It indicates the SDK is ...


3

Two ways you might do this: According to PC World, a smart phone or tablet can control the camera. "You can zoom the lens, set the self-timer, control the flash output, and fire the shutter." If you can find (or write) an app to do this, you have a free intervalometer. CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit) can be installed from memory card in a few minutes. ...


3

You might need more than a two-second margin -- on some camera settings, internal noise reduction takes as long as the photo, so it might be 25 or more seconds between shots. Turn off preview, not so much to save time, but to save power usage. On my camera, I find that the LCD back-light drains the battery more than the exposure itself. A reasonable ...


3

However a friend of mine challenged me if it's possible to shoot on the same spot without a fixed camera with just remembering tripod settings and lenses, once a week for over a year and just stitch edit/stabilized in post? It's certainly possible. The camera doesn't know or care if it's been moved or locked in place the whole time, so if you have a ...


3

The trick would be to find a transmitter that could receive the 2.5mm plug from your wired intervalometer. I'm not sure any such commercial product exists. It would probably be cheaper and easier to just buy a commercially available wireless intervalometer that fits your two cameras. Either of the two below would do what you want. https://www.amazon.com/...


3

Your assumption is incorrect. The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 can shoot up to 9999 frames. It's 9999 instead of 999 simply because they chose to dedicate space for another digit. I doubt there is a apreciable difference in cost for doing so. Similar question arise regarding Bracketing and Multiple Exposures. For each setting, the limit has to be chosen ...


3

Most intervalometers limit a specified number of frames to 999 images or less. However, many intervalometers will also allow you to set them to shoot indefinitely until the intervalometer or camera's battery is exhausted or the memory card is filled. Most cheap generic intervalometers are based on the same internal components. They're a lot like cheap ...


3

Can i use intervalometer to engage continuous shooting (setting continuous with speed ~5fps on camera instead of bulb) for 20 seconds and delay/timer of few minutes ? (with sony a6000) Yes, you can (assuming you mean an external intervalometer hooked to the camera's wired cable release port). When the cable release completes the "full press" circuit via the ...


3

Try a 3 second 2 minute 2 second interval, and it should work. The interval has to be a bit longer than the shutter time. The shutter time has to occur in that interval. A one second interval will not do a two second shutter. EDIT: changed interval, longer than the shutter duration. See comments. This manual posted by twalberg says "at least two seconds"....


3

So can I use the cheaper Sony intervalometer on the Samsung camera? No, you cannot. While the Sony multi-terminal connector looks like it's micro-USB, it isn't, really. doc-diy.net's list of shutter release pinouts has an image of the connector, and its wiring is nothing like a micro USB connector. It has an additional 10 pins (15 in all) vs. the standard ...


2

I've just produced an intervalometer (Timelapse+) with HDR capabilities, as in [ex0][ex1][ex2][wait][ex0][ex1][ex2][wait]... You can find out more here: http://www.timelapseplus.com Otherwise, yes, you can set the duration on the intervalometer to trigger the camera three times in rapid fire mode with auto-bracketing set on the camera. This is limited to ...


2

Magic Lantern for Canon T3i has support for Bulb Ramping and Intervalometer. Personally I do use Magic Lantern on my 60D and had no problems with it but I have not tried those features yet. Magic Lantern is a free software that sits on top of your Canon firmware. You can get more information about it on their website.


2

gPhoto is capable of this, and supports a huge variety of cameras. For one exposure every minute, this command will do the trick: gphoto2 --capture-image --interval 60 Command documentation. Granted, not everyone has a Linux or BSD machine sitting around to run this, but it's a perfect option for those who do.


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