20

So, here's what I got in just a few minutes using two basic tools: Curves, and Unsharp mask: I used Gimp, but this is basic stuff any decent image editing software will have. Here's all I did. First, I used the curves tool to dramatically increase the black point, increasing shadow contrast: Then, I pulled the curve upwards to brighten the (new) midtones: ...


8

I borrowed your image and one from another question like it, to try it in Image View plus more 3, which I made myself so I know all the underlying algorithms. I think this is pretty close, albeit the colours may be a bit different (my weakness as I am colour deficient). What I did was: Local contrast enhancement. Adobe calls this "clarity". It is similar ...


7

you can actually see which instagram filter people use in they photos. Just use a web browser for instagram. That filter is called "Walden" as you can see here: http://square-pics.com/m/858325353241497438_1085312802. There are many other browsers, just google them. Hope it helps :) Edit: By "web browser for instagram" i mean an external website designed ...


4

Its generally very hard to replicate any complicated filter exactly not knowing what exactly is being done by it, but the feel can be usually pretty closely matched. From what you have shown I believe that the "gritty look" can be replicated through a mixture of a duplicate layer with hard light overlay (with reduced opacity and slight blurring of the top ...


4

I think it can be archieved by lowering the black and white values in the curves and finally giving the diagram a slight curve towards top to strengthen white and lowering blacks further. The curves look this (in Gimp, can be archieved in any other tool too): I've cropped the original side of your image and used with the above values. Here's waht it looks ...


4

This specific look isn't the result of an Instagram filter. How to create such an image? It's a high-key setup with light sources leaving barely a shadow: probably a soft box or beauty dish right behind the camera, as you can see in her eyes. The camera was set to overexpose a stop or two. She wears a special makeup: In one comment she states that it's ...


4

You can't, legally, but as you note, the practice is so pervasive that it's unlikely that you'll get in any particular financial trouble. From a moral and ethical point of view, though, please don't. Facebook, Pinterest, and other social media sharing sites don't aggressively take them down because... it's to their advantage to not to. Unlike movies and and ...


4

Since you say its not Boomerang than my guess is you're referring to Flixel. It's a software application that's a little costly but really cool. You can do the same effects in Photoshop or After Effects with a bit more effort though. That's how I make Cinemagraphs as they've come to be known. On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/flixelphotos/ Or Hashtag ...


3

The image of the woman reclining appears to be a composite. The woman and the sky were not taken at the same time. You can see this as the direction of the light, it's color and contrast are completely different. The look of the other images can easily be recreated simply by increasing the saturation or vibrance. Try using Adobe Lightroom mobile which ...


3

Looks like "sunset" to me. You can only use it once every 24 hours though - so only the pros and the lucky tend to wait around for it. Google "Arizona sunset". Some places on this earth just get amazing colors. No filter required. Though, it is possibly the natural colors were simply over saturated in post in your examples.


3

I don't think that it's entirely possible. The effect looks to be a heavy tone mapping, which Lightroom can't do exactly. In Lightroom, Clarity, Contrast, and Tone Curve may get you quite a bit of the way there. Also, you may need to add a brush over the entire image and increase those settings on that as well to duplicate/multiply the effect. Edited to add:...


3

Obviously, this means that the file was edited by Adobe Photoshop at some point in time, or, in the case of the Instagram app, the application adheres to a data standard previously introduced by Photoshop. According to the developer information at exiv2.org, Photoshop stores some additional information in JPEG: Adobe Photoshop uses the APP13 segment for ...


3

The "effect" I can see in the pictures (that "stereoscopic or vintage look") is called chromatic aberration. It's an unwanted lens property. Usually cheaper lenses in specific conditions (like with aperture wide open) have it quite pronounced. If you are interested in creating such an effect, you can actually use a tool for fixing this defect in the ...


3

Increasing local contrast while reducing overall contrast when working with an image that has very high contrast between adjacent areas will cause such a glow in the lighter areas that are nearest to the darkest areas. Many apps use such a method and can, if applied strongly enough, result in the halo effect. The photo above was processed from a single RAW ...


2

I borrowed your image to try it in Image View plus more 3, which I made myself so I know all the underlying algorithms. I think this is pretty close, albeit the colours may be a bit different (my weakness as I am colour deficient). What I did was: Local contrast enhancement. Adobe calls this "clarity". It is similar to the unsharp mask with a very large ...


2

It looks like this filter uses a high black level and adds a yellow cast. One way to see this is by starting with the instagram version and looking at what it takes to make it look "normal". Here is my normalized version of the instagram version: I used the darkest area as the black level, which was (.161, .125, 090) in the original. I then use a white ...


2

There are smartphone-camera hybrids like Panasonic's CM1 or Samsung's Galaxy Camera. They have android OS running, so I think if you got wifi connection you could probably upload your photos. However, if you already got a smartphone and a DSLR but without wifi, you may want to look into wifi cards. With those cards you can add wifi functionality to your ...


2

It depends on what type of file you are editing with Photoshop or Lightroom. Those applications handle raw files in a totally different way than they handle jpegs, pngs, or even tiffs. The biggest difference between editing a jpeg using photoshop and editing it with most online editors is the degree of control over the adjustments. You will likely not only ...


2

In general, they're not based on any camera. Kevin Systrom, the co-founder and ex-CEO of Instagram, said the following in How does Instagram choose names for their filters? on Quora: I wish that I could say it's more interesting - but often it has to do with the inspiration for the filter... a type of film, a photo we've seen, or simply what we were doing ...


2

The general answer is "neither", but it depends entirely on what your target audience is. If you know that your target audience will be using a particular device, it is fine to mix for that device specifically, but for general release, this is why color spaces and standards exist. If you adjust your color on a well calibrated display in a standard color ...


1

Maximums from http://colorlib.com/wp/size-of-the-instagram-picture/ Square Image: 1080px in width by 1080px in height Vertical Image: 1080px in width by 1350px in height Horizontal Image: 1080px in width by 566px in height Not said as clearly, but verified at http://help.instagram.com/1631821640426723 D750 Small image is FX 3008 x 2008 DX 1968 x ...


1

Import the image to Instagram Apply the "Lark" filter Export the resulting image Sorry, but I couldn't resist. I'm not real familiar with the Lark filter in Instagram nor am I familiar with the labels Gimp puts on certain controls, but based on the images above, here are the differences that I see between the first image (which looks much better to my eyes)...


1

This image is a good example of a "high-key" photo. Most everything in the shot is white, off-white, pastel, and in bright shade. The exception to indicate there is a full range of tones is the black hair of the subject. Most every tone in the flat-lit shot is of relatively high luminance. The whites are clean neutrals without a colour cast. Again, the few ...


1

I think the 612 pixel dimension is some way out of date. This post from Instagram's blog is an old post introducing a new feature since version 2 (we're on version 6 on iOS now), and it says that the resolution has increased from 640px square to 1936px square on the iPhone 4, so it looks like even around 2-3 years ago, the dimensions of Instagram images was ...


1

Your version has more contrast than the instagram filter. Try reducing overall contrast to get closer, then reduce the highlights and/or increase the shadows if necessary. Once you've done this you may need to reduce overall brightness to compensate for the increase in the shadows. You may also want to decrease overall saturation a tad. The instagram result ...


1

Personally, I make use of Photoshop plugin - Alien Skin with which you can simulate the film behavior to your image, applying filters(to simulate for example polaroid film effects). The basic Alien Skin plugin is the Exposure. You can use it either as a Photoshop plugin or separately. Moreover, there exist another similar software called nik software. As ...


1

Here's a blog post that tries to reverse engineer the filters into camera/film combinations: http://blog.1000memories.com/97-old-school-instagram-filters-using-vintage-cameras-and-film Unfortunately, it doesn't have Amaro or Mayfair listed. And for what it's worth, my personal experience with a Yashica Mat-124G with Velvia 100 didn't come out looking the ...


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