21

You need to analyze your "feelings" as to why a P&S isn't doing it for you and come up with concrete reasons that translate to camera features. If your general thinking is just that your pictures aren't pretty enough, then you're right to hesitate and do some more research. Cameras are simply tools. Taking the picture is still up to you, and in the ...


12

Start by going outside without your camera and just looking at things. But with a different look: try to pay attention to small details instead of all the rush. You can't do that while you're walking: you'll have to stop for a while, seat in some park, cafe, shopping. And stop looking at the general movement and begin to look/follow those details: a mother ...


11

NO. Owning an expensive camera will not motivate you to use it. If you loved photography you would be doing it with anything you can. I take cell phone pictures all the time, because I just love taking photos. When I whip out my phone to take a picture though, I like to think I'm better at composition than your average cell phone photographer. Seriously... ...


10

This may seem like a too-broad, unanswerable question, but it's really not. There are two possible answers. I can't tell you which will be right for you, but once I tell you them, I think you'll know which it is. The possibilities are: Even if you don't know what you are doing, go out every day and take at least a dozen photographs. Review your results, ...


10

Grab your camera Grab some film Take a picture. (optional) Repeat step #3 Also, consider not equating gear with photographing. Having a library card does not make someone a good reader.


8

If you have trouble to get excited, I can understand that you took the option to get some new gear to get kicked into a new creative mood. Unfortunately, this question needs a very personal answer, so allow me to try to throw a few options out here. I am a on-and-off shooter and take breaks sometimes for a month or more and then find something that kicks ...


7

The best motivation for buying any camera is when you run into the limitations of your current one. If you don't understand why you want certain features, and when you would use them, you're not going to use them. There is a serious drawback of a DSLR and that is the size and weight. I keep making pictures with my phone, because it is with me all the time. I ...


6

I come from a technical background and when I started photography (for real, not just bring one when I go to conferences around the world), I saw it as a technical feat, to tame the DLSR. Then at some point I realized that I had nothing to take photos of. and what would it be? That's the hard part of photography. what makes a good photo, what is a good ...


5

Let me take a contrarian view... If you've lost motivation, perhaps your telling yourself something. Why did you start the project? What were the goals? Perhaps you've accomplished them and so the project is done but you haven't admitted it to yourself. Perhaps the project is serving no useful purpose and it's time to start some new project or set some new ...


4

"Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Man, The Image & The World" is a great book. Large prints, good quality and a comprehensive selection. Another book to consider is "Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Modern Century" which was printed to accompany the MoMA exhibit by the same name.


3

It seems you are looking for inspiration. Finding inspiration is a subject which has already been treated in this forum. Have a look at : Where do you find the inspiration for your photographs? How does one develop good photographic vision and style? How do you develop 'creative taste' in order to take a good photo? Is it bad to mimic other ...


3

Shooting with a DSLR is quite a different user experience than shooting with a P&S, so if your main complaint is difficulty in making adjustments, then a DSLR may help counter that, but it really depends on what your reasons for not taking photos are. As far as knowing what shooting on a DSLR is like, there isn't really a substitute for trying it. ...


3

For true beginners, Joe McNally's LIFE Guide to Digital Photography covers all the basics in a very readable style. I love his Hot Shoe Diaries and The Moment it Clicks, but not sure they're really good "first books" for someone wanting to learn photography. Tom Ang has also written a number of books, all of which are loaded with images and easy to digest ...


3

I think the best thing to do here is find a project. It doesn't really matter what the project is, but it should be something where you feel like you're making something. It could be a series of photos on a certain theme, or portraits of a certain person, or prints for a local art exhibition. The key thing is that you need a goal beyond "get back into ...


3

Take a vacation with your camera. If the area around you isn't inspiring, try going somewhere that has more things that might inspire you. (Particularly if you prefer environments to people.) I always find I'm more hyped up about photography after getting a great set of photos on a vacation (cruises in particular I find helpful as the locations vary, but ...


3

I find that when shooting street and sometimes other genres like documentary, it helps to have my camera set to black & white. I shoot RAW, but have the picture style set to mono, so I'm not losing anything; it just gives me the instant feedback of seeing the shot in mono on the back of the camera. That's not to say that you will leave the photo mono ...


2

I'd suggest starting either when it is dark, the weather is poor (provided you have proper protection for your gear) or where things are run down. All three can result in things seeming more interesting. It's also key to develop the ability to see photos without having to use the camera. Possibly even go looking at one of the times I described without a ...


2

I think a lot of people have given you excellent advice, and having taken breaks in the past, I can tell you this. Look at other people's work - go crazy and go wide - Ansel Adams to Ruth Bernhard to Henri Cartier Bresson. Then look at some fashion stuff. Peek into Facebook, Piccsy, 500px, Flickr and others. Flip through newspapers. Then, maybe look at the ...


2

I am not sure about this, but since no one appears to have mentioned it, here you go : Take up teaching, if you are not fully qualified to teach or dont have time to invest in teaching, inspire/teach some one you know. Let them get bitten by shutter bug. In this process you will also learn more and "could" reignite your passion for photography. You will be ...


2

The closest I could think of would be to check some websites such as Flickr or Picasa. For example, on Flickr, if you go to the explore section, or check the popular tags (relevant to the season) section http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags, it's very likely that people would upload pictures relevant to the current season/holiday afoot. The flickr blog http://...


2

i love reading Better Photography,, I can say that this is the best Photography Magazine based in India.. It gives tips on improving the skills and also showcase the work of the readers and also the expert's assignment on different projects.


2

This is a very good question actually. I have had the same "problem" many times, even though I live in Stockholm, Sweden, which is quite photo friendly. For me it's mostly a pshychological problem. One answer here suggests you look at what you like in others' street photography. Do that and use parts of that framework. For me, these small tips work: go ...


2

All of the answers above are right on target, let me add one little caveat. Photography is often seen as a good, easy creative outlet because the technology supports the art so well - auto this and auto-that. The reality is that, once you've gotten the skills, creating art is damn difficult. Expecting that getting a better camera will somehow be the magic ...


1

If you have enough time and energy to track other people's photos with such detail, perhaps you are not taking enough photos of your own? (Or you are the photo editor of a publication, in which case, you should be telling, not asking, us about workflow.) Any program that tracks tags likely uses a database backend, which will require "importing" the images. ...


1

For me, it was Uncommon Places by Stephen Shore. I primarily shoot black and white, but seeing his work in color made me start looking for more opportunities to shoot in color, and his focus on the mundane and seemingly inane opened my eyes to the fact that a photograph can be interesting for a reason other than a particularly interesting subject. Super ...


1

Such experiments are often carried out not only to have fun, but also to broaden set of skills in techniques available. An easy way to devise such an experiment would go like this: Think of an aspect in your usual process of making pictures. Try reasoning why you do that. Now you can deduce what could be achieved when doing the opposite. Verify your ...


1

You need two things more than anything else: Something to shoot and an audience to appreciate it. Maybe publish a newsletter, cover events for the local church, school, etc so you have things to shoot and an audience. I did this and was shooting every weekend with a purpose, a passion, and a deadline. Without this, the camera will collect dust. Second, take ...


1

To improve your street photography skills- travel. Travel a lot. You have to use your imagination & creativity & show them in your photos. Don't associate "photogenic" tag to certain places. Every place is worth photographing. When you visit a place for first time, everything that you see is worth capturing. So do it. Try to convey a message or ...


1

The only books on photography that I've ever read are all written by John Hedgecoe, the man who is said to have taught the World to photograph. As I have not read any photography books by other authors, means I can not compare and explain why would John Hedgecoe's books be better than others. But his name was not yet mentioned in previous answers, and I ...


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